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Ukrainian Studies

 

UKRAINIAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH, 1966-1979

An Annotated Bibliography

by

MARTA TARNAWSKY


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CONTENTS

Ukrainian Literature in English by Marta Tarnawsky is a comprehensive bibliography of Ukrainian literature in English. This installment covers the years 1966-1979. The entire bibliography consists of the following sections:


Articles in journals and collections

A001. "About one letter from a reader." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.8 (August 1966): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vsesvit 6 (June 1966): 154-155].

Vsesvit published excerpts from a letter of M.F. Salata with an editorial rebuttal. Salata, a fan of Agatha Christie, disagrees with a critical article about Agatha Christie in an earlier issue of Vsesvit, and accuses the journal of being "one-sided in depicting the literature of the whole world" and continuing the publication of "the nauseatic genre of realistic literature." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Reader 'nauseated' by socialist realism."

A002. "Actively, aggressively, creatively." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 9-10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 November 1968): 1].

About a meeting of Kharkiv's Writers' Union party organization which took place on 15 November 1968. Party committee's secretary B. Sylaev spoke about the accomplishments and problems of the last year and was reelected. However, criticism was expressed by N.V. Ivanenko, secretary of Kyiv's raion committee of the Party, to the effect that "certain books by Kharkiv writers are not yet measuring up to ideological and artistic requirements; many of them are weak, drab, and of little value. Kharkiv writers are not employing their full resources and talent to comment on vital political events in the life of the Soviet Union." In addition to Sylaev and Ivanenko, speakers at the meeting included D. Vyshnevs'kyy, I. Shutov, D. Sokolov, B. Kotlyarov, Z. Kats, I. Bahmut and I. Vyrhan.

A003. "Adam's Sons." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.532 (53) (February 1971): 6-11. illus., ports.

An unsigned article aboute the premiere of "Adam's Sons" at the Playhouse Theatre in Winnipeg on 20 February 1971. The play by Hannah Polowy and Mitch Sago is based on the novel Zemlia by Ol'ha Kobylians'ka. The article provides a summary of scenes from the play, as well as portraits and brief biographies of all the actors, directors, stage managers et al. The play was directed by Laszlo M. Nagy.

A004. "Adam's Sons"- acclaimed at Winnipeg premiere." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.534 (55) (April 1971): 8-13. illus.

An unsigned illustrated review of the play "Adam's Sons" by Hannah Polowy and Mitch Sago, staged on 20 February 1971 in Winnipeg. "It took a company of 151 actors, singers, dancers, musicians, directors, technicians and administrative people to produce the play", says the review. See also A003.

A005. "Adelgeym, Yevgeniy Georgievich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 5.

Twenty-five lines of bio-bibliographical data about the critic Ievhen Adel'heim, born 1907.

A006. "Afanas'ev-Chuzhbinskii, Aleksandr Stepanovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 2 (1973): 27. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical entry of 16 lines plus bibliography on Oleksandr Afanasiiev- Chuzhbyns'kyi (1817-1875), characterized by GSE as "Russian and Ukrainian writer and ethnologist".

A007. "Against anti-historicism in literature." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (12 December 1972): 1].

A report on a joint meeting of communists affiliated with the editorial boards of Vitchyzna and Vsesvit. The main topic under discussion was the article "Against anti-historicism" by O. Yakovlev (published in Literaturnaia gazeta 15 November 1972, reprinted in Literaturna Ukraina 21 November 1972). Yakovlev discussed the "extra- historical and extra-class appoach to problems of ethics and literature". While Yakovlev concentrated on examples from Russian literature, the present discussion - in which P. Mysyk, D. Pavlychko, Ye. Budnytska, V. Blyznets, A. Lysenko participated - focused on ideological shortcomings of such Ukrainian novels as Posol Urus-Shaytana by V. Malyk, Mech Areia by I. Bilyk and Smert' v Kyievi by P. Zahrebel'nyi. The meeting concluded that past events should be examined from positions of Marxism-Leninism.

A008. "Alchevskaia, Khristina Alekseevna." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 1 (1977): 102.

Thirteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet, teacher and translator Khrystia Al'chevs'ka (1882-1931).

A009. "Alchevskaya, Khristina Alekseyevna". Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972): 10.

Bio-bibliographical data (12 lines) about Khrystia Al'chevs'ka (b. 16 November 1882; d. 27 October 1931), Ukrainian poet, translator and pedagog.

A010. "Alexander Y. Korneichuk." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.1 (Spring 1973): 112.

An obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the playwright Oleksandr Korniichuk, who died on 14 May 1972 at the age of 66.

A011. "Alexander Semenenko." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.2 (Summer 1978): 214.

A brief obituary in the "Chronicle of current events" about Oleksandr Semenenko who died 1 June 1978 at the age of 77. Semenenko was the author of a book of memoirs entitled Kharkiv, Kharkiv.

A012. "Always with the Party, always with the people." Meeting of the Party Organization of the Kiev branch of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.12 (December 1973): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (2 November 1973): 2].

About a general party meeting of Ukrainian writers in Kyiv on 22 October 1973. The main address was by V.Yu. Malanchuk, candidate Politburo member and secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Ukrainian SSR. The speech was titled: "The urgent tasks of the writers' party organization for fulfilling the decisions of the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union." Malanchuk mentions by name and title a number of recent literary works which, in his view, "attest to the mature artistic level and social significance" of contemporary Ukrainian literature in which the "Leninist theme, the theme of patriotism and proletarian internationalism, of the friendship of the peoples of the USSR, of the heroism of labor and struggle, resounds with great intensity..." But he also calls attention to what he considers serious flows. "In poetry we notice a certain degree of alienation from the real world of our contemporary, a concentration on local phenomena, on highly private experiences." He castigates "...an unhealthy tendency to litter the language with obsolete words and dialecticisms, with wholly artificial expressions", with a "wide use of various archaisms, Polonisms, Galicisms..." "Our critics", says Malanchuk, "are insufficiently active in analyzing and evaluating the contemporary literary process..."

A013. "Always with the Party and the people. Resolution of the April 29, 1968 meeting of Kiev's party organization of the Union of Writers of Ukraine, on 'A Summary of the April (1968) Plenum, CC CPSU." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.6 (June 1968): 10-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 May 1968): 1].

The Communist writers of Kyiv heard and discussed a speech by F.D. Ovcharenko, Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine. Ovcharenko condemned "individual cases of political indifference", and called on the party committee, the secretariat and the presidium of the Writers' Union of Ukraine "to work out some concrete measures to further activate all ideological, political, and creative work of the Union and of each writer; to improve the ideological and artistic level of the Union's printed organs; and to increase the role of literary criticism in the development of contemporary Ukrainian literature." Title supplied by the Digest reads: "Resolve to correct deviations in literature."

A014. Anderson, Jack. "Tortured poet cries out from Soviet "Hell"." / Jack Anderson with Les Whitten. Ukrainian Review (London). 24.4 (Winter 1977): 76-77.

About Iosyp Terelia [Yosyp Terelya in text], rearrested in April 1977 after a brief time in freedom. The article is a reprint from an unspecified issue of the Philadelphia newspaper, the Evening Bulletin. Terelia is quoted as saying: "My poems, notes and even my thoughts - all this became evidence of criminal activities aimed at creating a so-called independent Ukraine."

A015. "Andrei Malyshko - a tribute (1912-1970)." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.523 (17) (April 1970): 42-43. port.

An obituary of Andrii Malyshko who died on 17 February 1970 in Ukraine. The tribute is signed by Peter Krawchuk, Nick Hrynchyshyn, Mitch Sago, Michael Karol, Mary Skrypnyk, Peter Prokop, William Harasym and Stanley Dobrowolsky. It says, among other things: "Among the noted writer's poetic works is a slim volume of verse dedicated to Canada. Entitled "Beyond the blue sea", it was written after the poet's visit to Canada and the United States in 1946... During his trip across Canada he endeared himself to the hearts of thousands of Ukrainian Canadians who had the opportunity of meeting him and hearing him recite his inspired poetry." With a letter of sympathy addressed to Oles' Honchar, Union of Writers of Ukraine.

A016. Andrienko, L. "Shevchenko Museum House in Kiev." Forum. 38 (Winter 1978): 15-17. illus.

According to this note, the house in Kyiv where Shevchenko rented a room in 1846 from the landlord Ivan Zhitnitsky, was restored and reopened as a museum in March 1974. This article is illustrated with seven photographs of the Shevchenko house exterior and interior.

A017. Andriichenko, Borys. "In the Presidium of the UWU Executive Board." / B. Andriychenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.8 (August 1976): 21-23. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (11 June 1976): 1].

The Digest's title: "Ukrainian writers' union commissions endorsed." Andriichenko reports about a meeting that took place on 8 June. Under discussion were plans for future activities, such as preparation of the 60th anniversary of the October revolution, "regular trips by writers' brigades to new construction sites", "creative meetings with readers", "consolidation of writers' contacts with labor collectives", etc. A number of commissions were established: on admissions, dramaturgy, criticism, artistic translation, children's literature, foreign literature, satire and humor, science fiction, work with young writers, etc.

A018. Androsenko, P. "Acute need." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.3 (March 1969): 25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kul'tura i zhyttia. (9 February 1969): 2].

Author, head of book sales administration at Ukrainian Cooperative Society, cites statistical data to prove that publications of "Veselka", Ukraine's only publisher of children's books, cannot satisfy the growing demand.

A019. "Andrushchenko, Yuriy (Marat) Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 26.

About the poet Iurii Andrushchenko, born 1910. (17 lines).

A020. "Antonenko-Davydovich, Boris Dmitrievich (pen names: Virny, Bodgan [sic], Kotyk, Petr and Antonenko)." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 29.

A biographical silhouette of Borys Antonenko-Davydovych, Ukrainian writer born 1899. A list of his works is given with dates and Ukrainian and English titles and some information is provided about his arrest. (51 lines).

A021. Antonyuk, A. "The story of a watch." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.6 (June 1973): 27-28. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (6 April 1973): 4].

A critical reaction of a viewer to the Chernivtsi theater production of Ivan Rachada's play "Neproshenyi hist'" shown on Ukrainian television. The Digest's title: "T.V. espionage thriller labelled less realistic than a fairy tale".

A022. "Anxiety and hope." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.3 (March 1969): 20-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (17 January 1969): 3].

Unsigned interview with Roman Fedoriv, editor of the literary journal Zhovten'. Fedoriv speaks about the preparations for Lenin's jubilee. A journal, according to Fedoriv, "not only reflects the literary process, it organizes and directs it... a journal takes an interest in a certain subject and tries to transmit its own enthusiasm to a writer". Fedoriv speaks also about the difficulties connected with such a process. The title as supplied by the Digest, reads: "Zhovten' editor speaks out on state of journal publishing."

A023. Arnaudon, B. "Recent news of Valentyn Moroz." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 27.6 (314) (June 1976): 18-19. port.

Appeal to readers to support the actions of the Committee for the Defense of Valentyn Moroz by letter writing to members of Canadian Parliament, the Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry in Moscow, etc.

A024. "Arrests and persecutions in Ukraine." ABN Correspondence. 23.4 (July-August 1972): 27-37.

A list of arrested and persecuted Ukrainians "with all the particulars known to us at present", according to this unsigned report. Includes data on Ukrainian writers Berdnyk, Chornovil, Chubai (Chubay), Hryhoriy Dzyuba [sic], Zinovia Franko, Leonid Kovalenko, Hryhorii Kochur, Anatolii Lupynis, V. Moroz, M. Osadchyi, Iryna Stasiv, V. Stus, Ie. Sverstiuk, I. Svitlychnyi.

A025. "Arrests of Ukrainian intellectuals." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 62-63.

An unsigned news item about the arrests of Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ivan Dziubain Kyiv. The item is a reprint from Censorship (no.7, Summer 1966, pp.48-49), a quarterly report on censorship of ideas and the arts published on behalf of the Congress for Cultural Freedom. The note surveys reports published in the Western press in April, May and June of 1966 (Neue Zürcher Zeitung, The Times, The New York Times, Le Monde). Some reports mention also additional arrests that took place in Lviv, Kharkiv and Odessa, and mention among those arrested, also the writers Mykhailo (Michael) Kosiv, Mykhailo Osadchyi (Michael Osadchy) and Ihor Kalynets'.

A026. "The art of translation". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.2 (February 1976): 24-25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 December 1975): 1].

About a meeting of Writers' Union of Ukraine Translation Commission, chaired by V. Korotych and dedicated to the discussion of Maksym Ryl's'kyi's book "Art of Translation" [Mystetstvo perekladu: statti, vystupy, notatky. Introd. by L. Novychenko. Kyiv: Radians'kyi pys'mennyk, 1975. 340 p. illus.]. V.V. Koptilov in his address spoke about Maksym Ryl's'kyi, the translator, his basic principles and methods and his "achievements in the study of the art of interpreting literary works in one's native language."

Digest's title: "UWU Translation Commission considers need for publication on literary translation".

A027. "An artist's word - a nation's weapon." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.5 (May 1967): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (24 March 1967): 2-4].

"Certain works published in recent issues of our journals," says the unsigned article, "are characterized by muddled ideological beliefs, a weakening in the tautness of public and social thought, substitution of indisputable, time-tested truths with homespun 'philosophy'. Even gifted poets occasionally decide to treat human life in pseudo-profound formulations." As examples, the article cites B. Oliinyk's poem "Doroha" (Dnipro, 1, 1967), the sketch "Hordynia" by Ia. Stupak (Vitchyzna) and the cycle "Z abetky sertsia" by L. and O. Berdnyk (Dnipro, 11, 1966). Editors of Dnipro and Vitchyzna are criticized for having published these works. The Digest supplied title reads: "Writers told to get back on socialist realism track."

A028. Asher, Oxana. "Alexander A. Granovsky - scholar, statesman and patriot." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.4 (Winter 1977): 390-394.

An obituary article about Oleksandr Hranovs'kyi, born on 22 October 1887 in Bereztsi, Volhynia, Ukraine, who died in Minneapolis on 4 November 1976. Hranovs'kyi, a professor of entomology at the University of Minnesota and, according to Asher, "a world-wide authority on aphids", was also the author of seven volumes of poetry in Ukrainian. The article, primary biographical in nature, contains also some comments about Hranovs'kyi's poetry.

A029. "Attacks on Ivan Dziuba continue." ABN Correspondence. 21.3 (May-June 1970): 9-11.

A translation of an article published originally in Molod' Ukrainy (10 September 1969) under the title "In spiritual emigration", signed by two writers - B.Chalyi, Ia. Iarmysh (Ya. Yarmysh) and seven journalists - L. Stefanovych, V. Prokopenko, L.Hubaryeva, V. Konyukh, V. Maryanyn, B. Mashtalyarchuk, V. Melnyk. The authors express their solidarity with L. Dmyterko article against Ivan Dziuba published in Literaturna Ukraina [cf. A235] and give vent to their indignation over what they call "unworthy behaviour" of Ivan Dziuba.

A030. "Attentiveness and exactingness: a conversation about poetic debuts." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.1 (January 1974): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (23 November 1973): 2].

An interview with Abram Katsnel'son, a poet and director of creative seminar for young poets. [Katsnel'son's name is misspelled and appears in the Digest as "Katselson"]. Katsnel'son mentions 62 young poets by name who are in the 19-23 age group and whom he considers noteworthy; of those who were first mentioned in the previous year at the Plenum, three - Mykola Lukiv, Roman Kachurivs'kyi and Vasyl' Hey - have published their first collections. Abram Katsnel'son quotes V. Malanchuk, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine, who criticized Ukrainian poetry for its "alienation from the real world" and agrees that some works "are flawed by the pernicious influence of modernistic poetics, which, along with the propaganda of political indifference, of the extra-class and extra- temporal nature of poetry, our enemies strive to propagate using any means at their command..." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Young poets criticized for modernistic experimentations."

A031. "Ayzenshtok, Ieremiya Yakovlevich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 45.

Thirty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about the Russian and Ukrainian literary critic Iarema Aizenshtok (b.1900).

A032. Babenko, Vickie. "Official contemporary Ukrainian poetry: mirror of socio-political forces." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.4 (Winter 1977): 39-50.

"Ukrainian literature has been censored more severely than Russian literature," says Babenko. "In fact, Ukrainian writers are subjected to special scrutiny (censorship) so that the mere touching upon political and national questions may lead to persecution and punishment..." In Babenko's view, "no Ukrainian writer would be treated as the Russian Yevtushenko or Voznesensky who dared to raise their voices against the goverment, but received no punishment." In most official Soviet Ukrainian verse collections, according to Babenko, "one encounters again and again the standard Soviet themes: praise of the Party, love of the Soviet Union, glorification of Lenin or the heroes of labor and the Great Patriotic War..." "Instead of convincing works of art," says Babenko, "the poets are producing trivial and uninspiring pieces of verse." Babenko singles out B. Oliinyk, as "an exceptionally gifted poet" who manages to "write on Ukrainian themes without provoking strong criticism from the official side." All quotations of poetry in this article are in the original, without English translations of any kind.

A033. Babenko, Vickie. "Themes of Boris Olijnyk - a contemporary Ukrainian poet." Ukrainian Review (London). 21[sic].3 (Autumn 1975): 72-82.

The article discusses "the artistry" of Borys Oliinyk's poetry, but does so on the basis not of his original poetry, but of the poetry's Russian translations which are quoted at length by the author. Babenko stresses the universal and patriotic themes in Oliinyk's work and concludes that Oliinyk's "urge for rediscovering the Ukrainian national identity is intense, and his patriotic feelings occupy a central place in his works."

A034. Babyshkin, Oleh. "He belongs to mankind." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.10 (October 1974): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (10 September 1974): 2].

An attempt to trace the early influences on O. Dovzhenko, the young artist-caricaturist. According to Babyshkin, in 1925 Iurii Ianovs'kyi left Kharkiv to become artistic director of the Odessa film studio. Dovzhenko followed his friend Ianovs'kyi and worked with him for a year. "The presence of Yanovs'kyy, already accustomed to the life and work of the film factory, helped to bring Dovzhenko quickly into the world of filmmaking." This piece is one of two articles published under the Digest supplied heading: "Mark Dovzhenko anniversary". See also A616.

A035. Badz'o, Iurii. "The right to life." / Yuriy Badzyo. Ukrainian Review (London). 27 [sic, i.e. 26].4 (Winter 1979): 13-20.

A letter written in 1977 and originally addressed to the "Supreme Soviet of the USSR, foreign Communist parties and democratic citizens of the world" grew eventually, according to the author, "into a scholarly research project dealing with various aspects of national life in Ukraine." Badz'o concludes that "the chauvinist policy" of the Communist Party "has denied the Ukrainian nation its right to life." An editorial note identifies Badz'o as a journalist and literary scholar.

A036. "Bagmut, Ivan Andrianovich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 49.

A bio-bibliographical note of 43 lines about the Ukrainian writer Ivan Bahmut (born 1903).

A037. "Bagmut, Ivan Adrianovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 37-38.

Twenty eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about Ivan Bahmut (b.1903), a writer whose works are characterized as attempts "to portray the inner world of the heroes... written with humor in a laconic style".

A038. Bahrij Pikulyk, Romana. "The expressionist experiment in Berezil': Kurbas and Kulish." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.2 (Summer 1972): 324-344.

The central theme of dramatic expressionism, according to the author, is "the alienation of man from other men and a sense of futility when confronted not only with other men in society but with the whole meaningless environment represented primarily by the big city and the machine." "All the factors that contributed to the spiritual crisis at the turn of the century left man with a total absence of absolute values," says Bahrij Pikulyk. She divides expressionist drama and expressionistic stage productions into surrealist and cubist expressionism. Surrealist expressionism, in her view, is "subjective, dreamlike, visionary", while cubist expressionism is "object-centered, intellectual and linguistically experimental." Kurbas, together with Kaiser and Meyerhold, according to the author, belonged to the cubist branch and "tended to use constructivist stage settings, the introductiuon of many planes for a maximum of simultaneity and the actual introduction of film sequences into the theatre." Bahrij Pikulyk discusses at some length the stagings by Kurbas of two plays "Jimmie Higgins" (based on a novel by Upton Sinclair) and "Narodnyi Malakhii" (The People's Malakhii) by Mykola Kulish and concludes that "the expressionist experiment in Berezil was a very successful one." A French summary of the article is on p.344.

A039. Bahrij Pikulyk, Romana. "Taras Bulba and The Black Council: the adherence to and divergence from Walter Scott's historical novel pattern." / Pikulyk, Romana Myroslava Bahrij. Dissertation Abstracts International. 40.1 (July 1979): 301-A.

An abstract of a 1978 Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Toronto. According to the abstract, the dissertation analyzes two novels - Gogol's Taras Bulba and Panteleimon Kulish's The Black Council "from the point of view of Sir Walter Scott's historical novel pattern". "This pattern," says the author, "consists of a fictional mediocre protagonist, the center of the fictional narrative; he is placed within an historical framework in which there are actual historical events and characters, a detailed description of manners, and a conflict between an old and new culture." The extent of the dissertation not indicated, no order no. provided.

A040. "Ban on Shevchenko's Testament song." Ukrainian Review (London). 14.3 (Autumn 1987): 95-96.

A news item about the prohibition by police of the singing of Zapovit at the end of a memorial Shevchenko celebration in Kolomyia in March of 1987.

A041. "Bar Shevchenko monument in Australian capital." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.4 (Winter 1973): 439.

According to this note in the "Chronicle of current events", the main obstacle to Ukrainian community efforts to erect a statue in honor of Taras Shevchenko in Canberra is an Australian law which bars erection of monuments in the capital except "in honor of Australian heroes and persons of national prominence".

A042. "The Bard of freedom and fraternity" / RATAU. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.10 (October 1976): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (31 August 1976): 1].

A solemn meeting marking the 120th anniversary of Ivan Franko's birth was held in Kyiv on 27 August 1976. Participants in the program included: L. Novychenko, Ie. Kyryliuk, P. Voron'ko, R. Lubkivs'kyi, I. Drach, V. Korotych and Yu. Surovtsev. The Digest's title: "Mark 120th anniversary of Franko's birth in Kiev."

A043. "Barskii, Vasilii Grigor'evich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 106-107.

A bio-bibliographical note (12 lines) about Vasyl' Bars'kyi (1701-1747), "Ukrainian writer and religious pilgrim". His four-volume travelogue which, according to this entry, enjoyed great popularity, is characterized as "detailed travel notes with numerous illustrations, which contain significant historical, geographical and ethnographic data".

A044. Barsom, Valentina Kompaniec. "Vasyl Stefanyk: a study of his artistic method." / Valentina Kompaniec Barsom. Zbirnyk na poshanu prof. d-ra Iuriia Shevel'ova = Symbolae In Honorem Georgii Y. Shevelov. [Collegium redactorum: William E. Harkins, Olexa Horbatsch, Jacob P. Hursky]. München: Ukrainian Free University, Facultas Philosophica, 1971. (Naukovyi zbirnyk, t.7). 231-237.

"The most obvious characteristic of Stefanyk's implicit artistic method is the absence of the obtrusive authorial commentary, i.e. the effacement of the figure of the author in his works," says Barsom. "Stefanyk is the first Ukrainian short-story writer to use the artistic technique of the putative author with such exquisite finesse." Barsom considers Stefanyk's correspondence the writer's creative laboratory and cites Stefanyk's letters to his friends and critics to indicate how he consciously developed his technique and "that he considered it to be the essence of his art." While the "absence of authorial editorializing" brings Stefanyk artistically close to the Russian writer Chekhov, says Barsom, they differ in that Chekhov "was an advocate of extreme artistic objectivity", while Stefanyk attained his objective by merging and identifying with the characters of his short stories.

A045. "Barvinok, Ganna (pseud. of Aleksandra Mikhailovna Belozerskaia-Kulish)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 2 (1973): 648. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical entry (8 lines) on Ukrainian writer Oleksandra Bilozers'ka-Kulish (1828-1911) who wrote under the pseudonym Hanna Barvinok.

A046. "Barvinok, Hanna". Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 110-111.

Eighteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Hanna Barvinok (real name: Oleksandra Bilozerska-Kulish, 1828-1911). This encyclopedic entry speaks of Barvinok's "knowledge of rural life, her ability to render folk speech and to use folklore" and of the fact that Soviet sources criticised her for "sentimentalizing Ukrainian village life and for including religious motifs."

A047. "Bash, Yakiv Vasyl'ovich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 112-113.

A bio-bibliographical note of 22 lines about the writer Iakiv Bash (real name: Bashmak, born 1908), author of sketches about Dniprostroi and novels.

A048. Bass, I.I. "The march against truth." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.5 (May 1970): 16-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo. 1 (January 1970): 61-70].

Achievements of Soviet Ukrainian culture, according to Bass, "evoke malice in Ukrainian bourgeois nationalist emigrés and result in slander, blasphemy, and arbitrary fabrications..." As an illustration to this statement, he discusses briefly recent critical writings of Ukrainian emigré scholars: D. Chyzhevs'kyi, M. Hlobenko, D. Doroshenko and Ievhen Malaniuk [Yevhen Malanyuk in text]. The main focus of his attack, however, is on Ivan Dziuba [Dzyuba] and specifically on Dziuba's articles published abroad, such as his essays on Shevchenko and Petefi and his reappraisal of Kobylians'ka's novel Cherez kladku (published in Suchasnist' in 1967 and 1969) and his article about the poetry of M. Vinhranovs'kyi (published in the London journal Vyzvol'nyi shliakh, no.3, 1969). In responding to Dziuba's declaration of loyalty [cf. A539], Bass says: "For I. Dzyuba the road to participation in the work of truly Marxist literary studies and criticism does not lie through declarative statements, but, first of all, through the most profound realization of his methodologically erroneous views, and through a totally critical reconsideration of much that he has written, particularly the articles mentioned above." The Digest's title: "New salvo against Dzyuba."

A049. "Baydebura, Pavel Andreevich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 60.

Thirty-three lines of bio-bibliographical data on the Ukrainian writer Pavlo Baidebura (born 1901).

A050. Bazansky, Michael. "Čeremšyna, Stefanyk, Martovyč, and their friendship." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1976-1977. 7 (1976-1977): 34- 35.

Summary of the seminar held on 11 December 1976 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, an honorary research associate in bibliography and librarianship at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, spoke about the writers Marko Cheremshyna, Vasyl' Stefanyk and Les' Martovych, who, according to the speaker, though different in personal character and mode of literary expression, formed a kind of spiritual trinity and were bound by a close life-long friendship.

A051. "Bazhan, Mikola Platonovich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 136-138.

This one and one-third page encyclopedic article about Mykola Bazhan (b.1904) mentions the "influence of the Futurists and Constructionists" on the poet's work in the 1920's, his abstract and complex poetic language, "profundity of thought" combined with "simplicity and clarity of poetic form" and "his ideological and artistic position as a socialist realist poet" seen in his "advocacy of socialist humanism, the ideology and the policy of the Party in art..."

A052. Bazhan, Mykola. "At the 6th Congress of Writers of the USSR. Speech by Mykola Bazhan." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.8 (August 1976): 18-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 June 1976): 3].

The Digest's title: "Bazhan urges greater attention to literary translation." Bazhan speaks of translations from and into Russian, of the need to raise the quality of translations. He expresses regrets that "superficial, mediocre, as well as simply unscrupulous translations which vulgarize and even distort the original, appear to this day in Russian and in other languages", that journals like Druzhba narodov do not exist on the republican level and that masters of translation are not honored with state prizes of the USSR.

A053. Bazhan, Mykola. "Daughter of the Ukraine: In honour of Lesya Ukrainka birth centenary (1871-1913)." / Mikola Bazhan. Soviet Literature. 2(275) (1971): 111-113. port.

"In the whole of world literature there are few women with such talent, wisdom and insight, few of such significance", says Bazhan about Lesia Ukrainka. Her plays, according to Bazhan, are "the finest and most important part of her literary legacy." Lesia Ukrainka's poetic talent "is dramatic even in her lyrical verse, "says Bazhan. "The best of these are meditations, almost dramatic soliloquies." With Lesia Ukrainka's b/w portrait on p.111.

A054. Bazhan, Mykola. "Flowering in unity and in reciprocal enrichment" / M.P. Bazhan. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.11 (November 1972): 2-3. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 September 1972): 2].

Speaking at the joint plenum of writers, Bazhan says: "The intensification of the ideological struggle between the new world of socialism and the old world of capitalism sets before the culture of socialism an even more militant task: combating, exposing and unmasking all attempts on the part of our enemies to revive old survivals, views and superstitions in the consciousness of our people and to instill in them the poison of nationalism, egoism, individualism..." The Digest's title: "Bazhan eulogizes 'the great Russian literature' and 'the great Russian language'."

A055. Bazhan, Mykola. "Incarnating Lenin's testament." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.l (January 1977): 21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 November 1976): 1].

Bazhan discusses translations of literary works of the various peoples of the USSR into Russian, and the translations of Russian literature into the languages of the various Soviet peoples. While the quantity of such publications he considers "truly gratifying", he raises questions "concerning the quality and effectiveness" of some of these works. Says Bazhan: "Frequently there appear raw, careless translations, done without deep contemplation of the original. Naturally, the effect of such works and adulterations of the original is negative." Bazhan points to the need for the application of higher standards and a greater responsibility on the part of editors and publishers. The Digest's title: "Bazhan calls for higher standards in literary translation."

A056. Bazhan, Mykola. "7th Congress of Ukraine's Writers. Opening address by Mykola Bazhan." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 2].

Bazhan pays tribute to the leadership of the Communist Party. "The party's solicitous and perceptive attitude to Soviet literature, combined with high standard and ideological exactingness [sic], with the rejection of the simplistic approach to questions of artistic creativity, has significantly mobilized the artistic intelligentsia." The Digest's title: "Bazhan delivers opening address".

A057. Bazhan, Mykola. "Speech by Mykola Bazhan". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.8 (August 1971): 10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 July 1971): 2].

Bazhan spoke at the Fifth All-Union Congress of Writers in Moscow. Said Bazhan, among other things: "...the number of book titles translated from the languages of Soviet peoples is not increasing in the plans of central publishing houses, but, on the contrary, decreasing"... "Just open today's Literaturnaya Gazeta and you'll see that the plans of Progress publishers contain a majority of Russian works. Only two names are non-Russian, including no writers from Soviet Ukraine." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Bazhan berates Progress Publishing House for lack of non-Russian works".

A058. Bazhan, Mykola. "A start in literature" / Mikola Bazhan. Soviet Literature. 12 (309) (1973): 148.

A letter of recommendation from Mykola Bazhan on behalf of Iurii Lohvyn [Yuri Logvin]. Bazhan recommends Lohvyn "as a reliable applicant for membership of the Union of Writers of the Ukraine." This letter is one of the examples published in this issue of Soviet Literature "to tell our readers abroad how young talented writers begin their literary careers, how they become members of the Writers' Union and who assists them..."

A059. Bazhan, Mykola. "Tribute on a 60th birthday: a song imbued with tenderness and thunder." Ukrainian Canadian. 31.617 (111) (December 1978): 23. port.

About the poet Oleksandr Pidsukha, with his portrait. Says Bazhan about Pidsukha: "Beginning from his first book... and ending with the plays and lyrics written in recent times, the poet created a whole galaxy of wonderful images and vivid pictures, reflected general moods and dreams."

A060. "Bazhan, Nikolay Platonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 61.

A bio-bibliographical note of 82 lines about Mykola Bazhan (1904-1983).

A061. Beauvoir, Simone de. " In May 1964 we were invited..." In All Said and Done / Simone de Beauvoir. Tr. by Patrick O'Brian. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons [1974]. 300-302.

Simone de Beauvoir in her final book of memoirs reflects on her life, her friends, her books and travels. In 1964 she and Jean-Paul Sartre were invited to Kyiv for the celebrations of the 150th anniversary of Shevchenko's birth. They hesitated, because of recent Soviet anti-semitic publication by Kichko, but did go, eventually. In her recollections, de Beauvoir recalls an anti- semitic conversation in Moscow, at the hotel Sovietskaya, and comments on anti-semitic passages in a Ukrainian book about Balzac [she does not name the author, but it is, obviously, Natan Rybak, the author of Pomylka Onore de Bal'zaka]. There are favorable comments about conversations with Bazhan and Korniichuk, as well as reflections on Shevchenko. De Beauvoir seems to have noticed that Ukrainians exhibited "staringly obvious" hostility to the Russians.

A062. Bedriy, Anatole W. "The concept of man in the works of Vasyl Symonenko." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.2 (Summer 1970): 61-67.

"Symonenko realized that man's intellectual and volitional faculties transform him from a member of a species into an individual, a being having some features which make him different from other men, while other features make all human beings similar..." says Bedriy. Quotations from Symonenko's poetry Bereh chekan' appear in the author's literal translations, i.e. She stood by the stove like a captive (8 lines, p.62); Our species is wise by nature (5 lines, p.65); Hey, new Columbuses and Magellans (7 lines, p.66); To honour my beloved homeland (6 lines, p.67). These represent excerpts from the following poems: Pich (Lyzhe polum'ia zhovte cherevo). Khor stariishyn z poemy "Fiktsiia" (Poroda nasha mudra vid pryrody). *** (Hei, novi Koliumby, Magellany). Hrudochka zemli (Shche v dytynstvi ia khodyv u travy).

A063. Bedriy, Anatole W. "Prominent intellectuals on persecution of Svitlychny and Dziuba." / A.W.B. ABN Correspondence. 17.6 (November/December 1966): 26-27.

See anotation under A064.

A065. Bedriy, Anatole W. "Prominent Western intellectuals protest against persecution of Svitlychny and Dziuba." / A.W.B. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 63-64.

A survey of prominent personalities speaking out on behalf of Ukrainian writers Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ivan Dziuba arrested in the USSR. Among those signing petitions, writing articles or otherwise engaging in actions of public protest were John A. Armstrong (USA), Birger Nerman (Sweden), Jens Nielsen (Denmark), H. Seton-Watson (United Kingdom), Ivan Matteo Lombardo, Paolo Rossi, Leo Magnino (Italy).

A065. Bedriy, Anatole W. "Vasyl Symonenko (1935-1963), Troubadour of Ukraine's freedom." ABN Correspondence. 17.1 (January-February 1966): 6-9; 17.2 (April 1966): 18-20.

Bedriy discusses in separate subchapters Symonenko as an individualist, Symonenko's religious beliefs, his views on the Soviet Russian economic exploitation of Ukraine, on the Russian social bondage of the Ukrainian people, on Soviet law and justice, his philosophical views and political ideas. The poet Symonenko, says Bedriy "comes out as a true freedom fighter for national independence."

A066. "Bedzik, Dmitro Ivanovich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 144.

Twenty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about Dmytro Bedzyk, Ukrainian novelist and dramatist, born 1898.

A067. "Bedzyk, Dmitriy Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 62.

Bio-bibliographical data about Dmytro Bedzyk, Ukrainian writer and playwright, born 1898. (36 lines).

A068. Beliaev, V.G. "Rybak, Natan Samoilovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 22 (1979): 519. Biblio.

"Rybak's best novels are characterized by intense conflicts, a publicistic approach, and a romantically elevated tone," says Beliaev in this note of 27 lines. Natan Rybak was born in 1913, and died in in 1978.

A069. "Beliaev, Vladimir Pavlovich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 149.

Twenty-four lines of bio-bibliographical data about Vladimir or Volodymyr Beliaiev, a writer who writes both in Russian and Ukrainian. Born in 1909, he is the author of novels, short stories and political pamphlets against Ukrainian nationalists and the Catholic Church.

A070. "Belous, Dmitriy Grigorevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 65.

Thirty-eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet Dmytro Bilous, born 1920.

A071. Belyaev, Victor. "Mikhailo Stelmakh." Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 171-175. port. on 172.

Stelmakh's works "teach love and kindness," and exhibit the "unity of most sober realism with romantic élan", according to Belyaev. He discusses Stel'makh's major books and says about Stel'makh's novel Pravda i kryvda: "The artistic searchings for the truth of life and its affirmation in images form the ideological-aesthetic basis, the message and soul of the novel, the pivot of the plot and the determinant factor in the development of the characters. Stelmakh condemns falsehood frankly, fervently and challengingly."

A072. Berdnyk, Oles'. "Arrest of Rudenko was 'historic crime', says Berdnyk in a letter to KGB." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.4 (Winter 1977): 71.

Berdnyk's letter was addressed to Y. Andropov, head of the Soviet KGB and to V. Fedorchuk, chief of the Ukrainian KGB. No data on the arrest are provided.

A073. Berdnyk, Oles'. "An open letter to PEN-Club." / Oles Berdnyk and M. Rudenko. Ukrainian Review (London). 25.1 (Spring 1978): 92-93.

A letter dated 5 January 1977 and signed by Oles Berdnyk and Mykola Rudenko appeals to International PEN on behalf of Ukrainian writers imprisoned or otherwise persecuted by the Soviet regime. "Fellow writers, raise a voice of protest against these medieval persecutions against creative writers", ask the two authors.

A074. "Berdnyk, Ukrainian poet, detained and released." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.2 (Summer 1977): 223-224.

According to this note in the "Chronicle of current events", Oles' Berdnyk, writer and member of the Ukrainian Public Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords, was arrested by Soviet authorities on 11 April 1977 and released two days later.

A075. Bereshko-Hunter, Ludmilla. "The search for the ideal place in Panteleimon Kulish's Chorna rada." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 1.1 (Fall 1976): 3-11.

The vision of "the World Upsidedown", says Bereshko-Hunter, has preoccupied poets for centuries. "The characteristic of the World Upsidedown is opposition, usually between an old order and a new one or between existing good and threatening evil. This kind of clash is always accompanied either by violence, disorder or horror. Such disruption inevitably raises the question of how, when, and where a resolution can be found, if at all. Each of the responses that Chorna Rada provides is intimately linked with a specific way of life, either on the Sich, or on the khutir. It is no surprise, then, that the quest for the Ideal Place should be one of the dominant preoccupations of the characters in Kulish's novel," according to the author.

A076. "Berynda, Pamva." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 3 (1973): 225. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical entry of 8 lines on "Ukrainian lexicographer, poet and translator", who was born between 1550 and 1579 and died in 1632.

A077. "Berynda, Pamva." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 2 (1978): 217-218.

Eighteen lines about Pamva Berynda, Ukrainian lexicographer, poet and translator, born 1632.

A078. "Besoushko, Walter Volodimir". Men of Achievement. 5 (1978): 47-48. port. on 47.

Sixteen lines of bio-bibliographical data, with portrait, of Slavic scholar and educator Volodymyr Bezushko (b. 1894).

A079. Bespalova, A.G. "Kostomarov, Nikolai Ivanovich" / A.G. Bespalova and V. Ia. Gerasimenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 439- 440. Biblio.

Mykola Kostomarov (1817-1885) is characterized as a "Ukrainian and Russian historian, ethnographer, writer, and critic." As a historian, according to the authors, Kostomarov "interpreted the major issues of Russian and Ukrainian history from the standpoint of bourgeois historiography", and in his dramas "he portrayed the liberation struggle of the Ukrainian people from a nationalist standpoint." Kostomarov is credited with being one of the first Ukrainian literary critics. (55 lines).

A080. Bezushko, Volodymyr. "The last novel of Bohdan Lepky Krutizh ("Disorder")". / Wolodymyr Besoushko. Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 270.

English summary of an article about Bohdan Lepkyi's historical novel Krutizh. The article appears in Ukrainian on pp. 21-26.

A081. "Biba, Petr Nikitovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 73.

Twenty lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet and journalist Petro Biba, born 1913.

A082. "Bi-centenary this month." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.516 (10) (September 1969): 41. port.

An unsigned note with a b/w portrait on the occasion of the forthcoming 200th anniversary of the birth of Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi (Kotlyarevsky). The note mentions the various commemorative events planned for this occasion in Ukraine, such as ceremonial meetings, academic conferences, literary exhibitions, concerts, as well as new publications of Kotliarevs'kyi's works, new theatrical productions of his plays and translations into foreign languages.

A083. Bichuia, Nina. "The world of Natalena Koroleva." / Nina Bichuya. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.6 (June 1967): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (9 May 1967): 4].

An article about Natalena Koroleva's novels Son tini and 1313 published recently by the Slovak Pedagogical Publishing Co. in Bratislava (Division of Ukrainian literature in Priashiv). Digest's supplied title: "Ukrainian writer of the 'thirties introduced to readers in Ukraine".

A084. Bida, Constantine. "Fragments from the life of Olena Pchilka (excerpt from the book Lesya Ukrainka)."/ C. Bida. Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 26.10 (October 1975): 25. port.

Biographical fragments about the writer Olena Pchilka, mother of Lesia Ukrainka, excerpted from the book Lesya Ukrainka: Life and Work. [cf. B113]. Illustrated with O. Pchilka's b/w portrait.

A085. Bida, Constantine. "The linguistic aspect in the controversy over the authenticity of The Igor' Tale." / Constantin Bida. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1970- 1971. 1 (1970-1971): 47-49. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read on 16 March 1971 and of the discussion which followed. According to the speaker, professor of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Ottawa, André Mazon's questioning of the authenticity of Slovo o polku Ihorevim and classing it as a "pastiche of Zadonščina" stimulated "the most intensive discussion ever undertaken in the literature on this topic." In Bida's view, as reported here, the linguistic criteria are the most suitable in proving the authenticity of Slovo and both the chronological and the typological aspects in the language of the work should be considered.

A086. Bida, Constantine. "A quest for the dramatic: Ukrainian authors turn to Shakespeare." Zbirnyk na poshanu prof. d-ra Iuriia Shevel'ova = Symbolae In Honorem Georgii Y. Shevelov. [Collegium redactorum: William E. Harkins, Olexa Horbatsch, Jacob P. Hursky]. München: Ukrainian Free University, Facultas Philosophica, 1971. (Naukovyi zbirnyk, t.7). 45-53. Appendix.

A survey of Ukrainian translations of Shakespeare's works, from the partial translation of "Othello" by Mykola Kostomarov in 1848 to a three-volume Ukrainian translation of Shakespeare's plays published in Kyiv in 1964. The appendix on p.53 gives a bibliographical listing of Panteleimon Kulish's published translations from Shakespeare.

A087. Bida, Constantine. "Vestiges of antiquity in Ukrainian baroque literature." Canadian Contributions to the VIII International Congress of Slavists Zagreb-Ljubljana, 1978). Tradition and Innovation in Slavic Literatures, Linguistics and Stylistics. Ed. by Z. Folejewski and E. Heier, G. Luckyj, G. Schaarschmidt. Ottawa: Canadian Association of Slavists, 1978. 25-35. Biblio. notes.

The antique legacy, says Bida, "infiltrated Ukrainian baroque from the West..." Classical literature and Hellenic mythology, according to the author, "provided the baroque writer not so much with themes and genre models, but with an abundance of symbols as vehicles for the concretization of spiritual notions and material for stylistic devices such as comparison, antithesis and hyperbole." Bida examines the work of Ioanikij Galatovskyj, author of Kliuch razumeniia, one of the most prolific writers of the 17th century, and his contemporary Antonij Radivilovskyj, author of homilies. "The constant reference of the Christian oriented and puritan Ukrainian baroque writers to the classical world, even if sometimes exaggerated and misused, as in the case of I. Galatovskyj and A. Radivilovskyj", says Bida, was "not entirely inorganic or unnatural to the literature still rooted in the medieval Byzantine tradition."

A088. Bida, Constantine. "The works of I. Galjatovs'kyj." / Constantin Bida. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 11-13. Biblio.

A summary of the paper read on 20 October 1972 and of the discussion which followed. Constantine Bida, professor at the University of Ottawa, spoke about Ioannikii Galiatovs'kyi - his life, education, Weltanschauung, and works in the context of the 17th century Ukraine. Galiatovs'kyi was a Ukrainian Orthodox churchman, rector of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, later archimandrite of Chernyhiv, and author of a collection of sermons Kliuch razumeniia (1659).

A089. Bilets'kyi, Andrii. "East and West. Nominated for the Maksym Ryl's'kyy Prize." / Andriy Bilets'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.5 (May 1976): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 March 1976): 4].

About Vasyl' Mysyk and the range of his poetic translations. Mysyk, according to Bilets'kyi, has done translations not only from European languages - from English (Shakespeare, Shelley, Byron, Keats, Burns), German (Goethe), French (J. Du Bellay) - but also from Farsi and Tadzik (works of Rudaki, Omar Khayyam and Hafiz). "The translator has a marked tendency toward the exact, and even aphoristic expression", says Bilets'kyi. The Digest's title: "Translator from Western and Eastern languages proposed for Ryl's'kyy Prize."

A090. Bilets'kyi, Andrii. "The translation of Dante's Comedy is complete." / Andriy Bilets'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 16].

The article provides a survey of Ukrainian translations from Dante and reports on a recently completed translation of Dante's "Inferno" by Ievhen Drobiazko (Yevhen Antonovych Drobyazko) to be published by Dnipro Publishers in 1975. The Digest's title reads: "Translation of Dante's "Comedy" completed."

A091. Bilets'kyi, Oleksandr. "Pavlo Tychina (1891-1967)." / Alexander Beletsky. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 161-164.

A general survey of Pavlo Tychyna's life and work in an issue devoted to Soviet Ukrainian literature and art. "The combination of these two qualities - refined melodiousness and the wrathful movement of a sharp sword raised aloft - is an inimitable and unparalleled feature characteristic only of the voice of this great poet," says Bilets'kyi.

A092. "Bilets'kyi, Oleksandr Ivanovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 20-21.

One page encyclopedic article about the Ukrainian and Russian literary scholar Oleksandr Bilets'kyi (1884-1961). The entry says that Bilets'kyi's "range of interests was extraordinarily wide and varied, encompassing the literatures of various countries and peoples" and mentions specifically his studies of Ukrainian writers Tychyna, Ryl's'kyi, Sosiura, Shevchenko, Nechui- Levyts'kyi, P. Myrnyi, Kotsiubyns'kyi, Lesia Ukrainka and Franko.

A093. "Bilets'kyi-Nosenko, Pavlo Pavlovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 21-22.

According to this one page encyclopedic article, "Bilets'kyi's works (more than 60 titles) are quite diverse in content and include treatises on aesthetics, economics, philosophy, medicine, agriculture... Since they remained largely unpublished, however, Bilets'kyi was little known during his lifetime. Only a few of his Ukrainian works have since been published". He wrote in Ukrainian poems, novels, dramatic tales and translations from German poetry. Bilets'kyi was born in 1774 and died in 1856.

A094. "Biletskyy, Andrey Alaksandrovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 74.

Bio-bibliographical data (21 lines) about Andrii Bilets'kyi, Ukrainian philologist born 1911.

A095. "Bilous, Dmytro Hryhorovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 27-28.

A quarter-page bio-bibliographical data about Dmytro Bilous, poet, satirist and children's writer (born 1920).

A096. "Bilyk, Ivan (Rudchenko, Ivan Yakovych)." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 28.

Bio-bibliographical data about Ivan Rudchenko (1845-1905), Ukrainian folklorist, ethnographer, literary critic and writer, best known as a co-author of the novel Khiba revut' voly, iak iasla povni with his brother Panas Myrnyi. (Half a page).

A097. "Bilylovs'kyi, Kesar Oleksandrovich." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 28-29.

Bio-bibliographical data (1/3 page) about Ukrainian poet, publisher and translator Kesar Bilylovs'kyi (1859-1934). According to this entry, his "unquestionable lyric talent and a sense of verse imparts elegance and charm to many of his poems."

A098. "Bishop, Tania Kroitor, 1906- (Tetiana Shevchuk, Virlyana Semkiw, a pseudonym)." Contemporary Authors. Permanent series. 2 (1965-1978): 61.

Bio-bibliographical data about Tetiana Shevchuk entered under the following categories: personal data with address, career, writings, work in progress, avocational interests.

A099. Blair, W. Granger. "Arrest of two Ukrainian writers." ABN Correspondence. 17.3 (May-June 1966): 6.

A news item reprinted from the New York Times of 7 April 1966 about the arrest in Soviet Ukraine of Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ivan Dziuba.

A100. "Blakitnyi-Ellan (pseud. of Vasilii Mikhailovich Ellanskii)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 3 (1973): 356-357. Biblio.

An unsigned bio-bibliographical entry of 30 lines about Vasyl' Ellan-Blakytnyi (1894-1925). He is characterized as "one of the leaders of the proletarian literary movement in Ukraine" who in the 1917-1920 period "committed serious errors, nationalistic in nature, in his political and literary work", but who later became "an active fighter against bourgeois nationalism and national betrayal". His poetry is characterized as having "impetuous energetic rhythm" and being "filled with enthusiasm over the struggle for the triumph of the proletarian revolution".

A101. "Blakitnyy (real name Yellanskiy) Vasiliy Mikhaylovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 70.

Bio-bibliographical data about Vasyl' Ellan-Blakytnyi (33 lines), Ukrainian writer, poet, journalist. The date of birth is given as 1894, date of death as 4 December 1925 in Kharkiv.

A102. Blazhko, El. "The first co-author. A joint meeting of the Collegium of the UkSSR State Film Committee and the representatives of creative unions." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.3 (March 1977): 25-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (3 December 1976): 4].

A report on a meeting whose focus was on the role and tasks of script writers and their relations with Ukraine's film studios. "Most of the artistic films produced by the republic's studios in the past few years have used scenarios written by writers and journalists. In 1976, too, several films were created with the help of writers, who authored scripts. The 1977-1980 plan for the O. Dovzhenko Film Studio calls for a number of important themes to be treated by the republic's authors," says Blazhko. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian movie industry plagued by shortage of good scripts."

A103. "Bobinskiy, Vasiliy Petrovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 73.

Thirteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet and translator Vasyl' Bobyns'kyi who was born on 11 March 1898 and died in imprisonment on 2 January 1938.

A104. "Bobyns'kyi, Vasyl' Petrovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 66.

One-half page of bio-bibliographical data about the poet Vasyl' Bobyns'kyi (1898-1938). The entry singles out Bobyns'kyi's poem "Smert' Franka" which "creates the striking figure of a poet-soldier" and which was apparently written during the author's imprisonment in Lviv and which subsequently received "the Ukrainian Soviet State award as one of the best literary works written on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the October Revolution". Bobyns'kyi was later arrested by the Soviets and died in a Soviet prison on 2 January 1938.

A105. "Bocun[sic]-Vlasenko, Anna Maria." Who's Who of American Women. 10th ed. (1977-1978): 79.

Sixteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about Anna Boitsun-Vlasenko (Bojcun), pedagogue and literary critic born 1917.

A106. "Bodians'kyi, Osyp Maksymovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 66-67.

Ca. one page of bio-bibliographical data about Ukrainian philologist and Slavist, historian and writer Osyp Bodians'kyi (1808-1877) whose interests and scholarly studies are characterized as "typical of East Slavic Romanticism".

A107. Bodnaruk, I. "Our women writers who were destroyed by the occupants of Ukraine." Tr. by Hanna Mazurenko. Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 30.2 (341) (February 1979): 24-25.

About the writers Lada Mohylians'ka (1902-1937), Luciana Piontek (1899-1937) and Liudmyla Staryts'ka-Cherniakhivs'ka (1868-1941) who perished at the hands of the Soviets and the poet Olena Teliha (1907-1942) who was executed by the Nazis.

A108. Bogdanova, Zinaida. "Andrei Malyshko (1912- 1970)." Soviet Literature. 7(268) (1970): 106-108. port.

An introductory article to accompany a selection of Malyshko's poetry in translation. [cf. T243]. "Malyshko is a profoundly national poet..." says Bogdanova. "In its tonality, in its poetic imagery, the melody of Malyshko's verses naturally approximates to folklore, to the people's way of thinking and their outlook." In speaking of individual poems, some of which appear in the selection, Bogdanova points out such qualities as "rhytmical structure and metaphorical associations", "a strictness of harmony, an almost solemn air combined with simplicity and modesty of expressive means", "transparent purity, sincerity and inspiration", "intense thought, bitter recollections of the war, inspired patriotism."

A109. "Bohdan Krawciw." Ukrainian Quarterly. 31.4 (Winter 1975): 448-449.

An obituary note of one and one-half pages in the "Chronicle of current events". Bohdan Kravtsiv, Ukrainian poet, journalist and scholar, was born in Lopianka, Western Ukraine on 5 May 1904 and died in Rutherford, N.J. on 21 November 1975 at the age of 71.

A110. Bohdaniuk, Volodymyr. "Further trials of Ukrainian intellectuals." / V.B. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.4 (Winter 1966): 90-92.

A survey of Soviet reactions to the publication in the West in January 1965 of Vasyl' Symonenko's poetry and of the series of arrests and trials that took place subsequently in 1965 and 1966. Among the intellectuals subjected to arrests the writers Svitlychnyi, Dziuba, Osadchyi, Ihor Kalynets are mentioned briefly. A list of those tried and sentenced to imprisonment contains the names of the writers Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi, Valentyn Moroz, Mykhailo Masiutko [Mykhaylo Masyutko], Mykhailo Kosiv, Mykhailo Ozernyi [Mykhaylo Ozerny] and Anatolii Shevchuk [Anatoly Shevchuk].

A111. Bohdaniuk, Volodymyr. "Oral literature of the people."/ V. Bohdaniuk. Ukrainian Review (London). 22.1 (Spring 1975): 83-85.

A chapter in a longer work on Ukraine. Brief descriptions of the various types of Ukrainian folklore: byliny, dumy, tales, ritual songs, koliadky, Kupalo songs, wedding songs, etc.

A112. "Boian." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 88.

This entry of 15 lines characterizes Boian as a "Russian singer-warrior of the second half of the eleventh-beginning of the twelfth centuries..." Boian is first mentioned in the Slovo polku Ihorevim.

A113. "Boichenko, Oleksandr Maksymovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 89.

Oleksandr Boichenko (1903-1950) was a Soviet Ukrainian writer who wrote also in Russian. (1/3 page of bio-bibliographical data).

A114. Boiko, Iurii. "Methodological problems confronting the literary scholar." / Jurij Bojko-Blochyn. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1970-1971. 1 (1970-1971): 50- 51. Biblio.

A summary of the paper read on 23 March 1971 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at Munich University in West Germany, discussed his own experiences as a literary scholar and the various methods he employed in his literary research on Kotsiubyns'kyi, Franko, Shevchenko et al.

A115. Boiko, Ivan. "Mykhailo Hrushevsky. On the 100th anniversary of his birth." / Ivan Boyko and Yevhen Kyrylyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.11 (November 1966): 21-25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in in Literaturna Ukraina. (30 September 1966): 3-4].

A bibliographical survey of Hrushevs'kyi's main works from the point of view of Marxist- Leninist critics. In discussing Hrushevs'kyi's five-volume history of Ukrainian literature and his studies of Ukrainian writers, the authors speak of Hrushev'skyi's "anti-scientific", "bourgeois- nationalist tendency". The title supplied by the Digest: "Hrushevs'kyy remembered on his anniversary."

A116. Boiko, Leonid. "New life desires new words. Notes from the Republic Conference of Poets." / Leonid Boyko, Stanislav Tel'nyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.3 (March 1966): 17-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 January 1966): 1-4].

Participants at the republican conference of poets discussed the current state of Soviet Ukrainian poetry, expressed critical comments about Roman Chumak's book "A drop of pure blood" [Kraplyna chystoi liubovi], as well as their desire for a revival of such "talented" and "extremely interesting" poets as B.I. Antonych, and for the establishment of a special periodical devoted to Ukrainian poetry. Participating in discussions were B. Kotlyarov, A. Shevchenko, R. Bratun', P. Voron'ko. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Poets meet. Discuss past achievements, dream about future."

A117. Bolshak, Vasil. "Craftsman of beauty." Ukraine. 3(7) (1971): 22. port.

This article about the photographer Mikola Kozlovsky of Kyiv includes among other examples of his work a large b/w portrait of Maksym Ryl's'kyi.

A118. "Borduliak, Timofei Ignat'evich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 3 (1973): 459-460. Biblio.

An unsigned 20-line encyclopedic note about the writer Tymotei Borduliak (1863-1936). Borduliak, according to this note, "described with harsh realism the life of peasants who suffered from insufficient land and from oppression by landowners, kulaks, and the Autro-Hungarian authorities".

A119. "Borolych, Iurii Ivanovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 97.

Iurii Borolych (born 1921) is a Ukrainian writer living in Priashiv, Slovakia. (13 lines of bio- bibliographical data).

A120. "Borovykovs'kyi, Levko Ivanovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 97-98.

Twenty-four line encyclopedic entry about Ukrainian poet Levko Borovykovs'kyi (1806- 1889) whose poems are characterized as touching upon "ethical problems and the problems of everyday life, less frequently upon social questions."

A121. "Borshosh-Kumiats'kyi, Iulii Vasyl'ovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 100-101.

Fourteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet, born 1905, whose work, according to this entry, deals with "themes of the struggle of labor in the pre-Soviet period and the lack of workers' rights".

A122. Börtnes, Jostein. "Frame technique in Nestor's Life of St. Theodosius." Scando-Slavica. 13 (1967): 5-16.

Nestor's Life of St. Theodosius, says Börtnes, is still the object of differing evaluations. The author sides with scholars, such as A. Šachmatov, Tschiževskij and G.P. Fedotov, who consider Nestor's story a valuable work of art. "Despite the fact that Nestor has furnished the biography proper with a frame consisting of an exordium and a conclusio," says Börtnes, "scholars have hitherto mainly been concerned with the life in its more restricted sense when trying to reach an aesthetic evaluation of Nestor's story." But the framework, according to Börtnes, "is in fact indispensable for a proper interpretation, showing as it does that Nestor had a very clear idea of how to compose the biography of a saint. The Life of St. Theodosius is no collection of unconnected anecdotes from the saint's life, but a literary composition patterned on traditional models."

A123. Börtnes, Jostein. "Hagiographical transformation in the Old Russian Lives of Saints." Scando-Slavica. 18 (1972): 5-12.

According to the author, "Old Russian hagiography comprises thousands of texts", most of them unpublished. Russian scholar V.O. Ključevskij came to the conclusion that the Lives have no documentary value and cannot be used as sources for history. But "The hagiographer's 'slovo', his discourse, does not refer directly to objective, historical events. It's signification is created by the interplay of the narrative and the rhetorical system within the text," says Börtnes. "Contrary to widespread opinion, this text is no arbitrary collection of unconnected anecdotes from a saint's life, but an entity, in which the biography proper is inscribed within a frame consisting of an exordium and a conclusio. In composing this frame, the hagiographer followed a rigidly established tradition," says Börtnes. In his view, "The hagiographical process aims at the suspension of the opposition between narration and quotation, in order to create a discourse in which these different modes of enunciation function together." The author analyzes the relation between narration and quotation in the childhood sequence of Nestor's Life of St. Theodosius. The terms "Kievan Rus'" and "Old Russian literature" are used throughout the article.

A124. "Borys Antonenko-Davydovych." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.3 (Autumn 1970): 87.

A biographical profile of Borys Antonenko-Davydovych, born on 5 August 1899, who is characterized here as one of Ukraine's "most outstanding writers and literary critics". His works, according to this anonymous article, "are marked by severe realism with the colouring of sparkling humour often mixed with irony and sarcasm."

A125. "Borzenko, Sergey Aleksandrovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 88.

Twenty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about the Russian and Ukrainian writer Serhii Borzhenko, b. 1909.

A126. "Boychenko, Alexandr Maksimovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 86.

Bio-bibliographical data about Oleksandr Boichenko, characterized as "Ukrainian writer and Komsomol official". Dates of birth and death are given as 22 September 1903 and 30 May 1950.

A127. Boychenko, V. "Party organizations and ideological steadfastness of the creative intelligentsia." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.9 (September 1966): 15-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Komunist Ukrainy. 6 (1966): 10-18].

The author is secretary of the Kyiv city committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine. The article calls for better ideological and educational work of the party with the creative intelligentsia. Says Boychenko: "we still encounter ideologically immature and artistically weak works in which we feel no pathos of the building of Communism, and which do not depict the grandeur of the cause of the Party..." '... some young artists surrender to nihilistic moods, become enthused with formalistic trends, and sometimes express ideologically harmful opinions (on the pattern of the bourgeois motto 'freedom of creativity'). This charge can primarily be addressed to the literary critics I. Dzyuba and V. Stus, and the poetess L. Kostenko." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Party official hits 'freedom of creativity'. Dzyuba, Stus, Kostenko singled out in charge."

A128. "Bozhko, Savva Zakharovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 87.

Eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about Sava Bozhko, writer and journalist (b. 1901 - d.27 April 1947).

A129. Braichevs'kyi, Mykhailo. "The first to take up the pen." / Mykhaylo Braychevs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.5 (May 1968): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 March 1968): 2].

About Ilarion's "Slovo o zakony i blahodaty" which the author characterizes as "a profoundly philosophical work"..."astonishingly astute and timely..." The Digest's supplied title reads: "Historian cites XIth century treatise on right of separate and equal development."

A130. "Bratun, Rostislav Andreevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 90.

Twenty-four lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet Rostyslav Bratun' (born 1927).

A131. Bratun', Rostyslav. "Developing good traditions." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 January 1970): 2].

An address at the 4th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. Bratun' calls for the establishment of book stores which would sell books published in 'sister republics', for closer relations between Polish and Ukrainian writers, for summer courses of Ukrainian language to foreign visitors, for greater attention to the popularization of works of Ukrainian writers who live in socialist countries. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Study of Ukrainian among foreigners urged by Bratun."

A132. Bratun', Rostyslav. "Literature in a land reborn." / Rostislav Bratun. Ukrainian Canadian. 31.615 (109) (October 1978): 32-34. illus.

In a special issue devoted to the city of Lviv, R. Bratun', the chairman of the Lviv branch of the Writers' Union of Ukraine, discusses the current literary life of Lviv, the Lviv literary journal Zhovten and the Kameniar Publishing House. According to Bratun, there are 70 writers in the Lviv branch. He makes brief comments about the senior writers Dmytro Bandrivs'kyi [Bandrivsky] and Iryna Vil'de, as well as about Roman Fedoriv, Roman Ivanychuk [Ivanichuk], Taras Myhal, Heorhii Knysh, Nina Bichuia [Bichuya], Roman Lubkivs'kyi [Lubkivsky], Volodymyr Luchuk and the critics Mykola Ilnyts'kyi [Ilnytsky] and Taras Salyha. The article has three b/w illustrations: portrait of Bratun, photo of Ivan Franko grave on the Lychakivske cemetery in Lviv and a group photo of Lviv writers including, among others, Roman Kudlyk, Iryna Vilde, Roman Lubkivs'kyi, Roman Fedoriv, R. Bratun and Roman Ivanychuk [caption reading erroneously: Ivancuk].

A133. Bratun', Rostyslav. "UC. 'Interesting...impressive...'" Ukrainian Canadian. 24.544 (37) (February 1972): 27. illus.

About Rostyslav Bratun's recent three-week visit to Canada. The title refers to Bratun's opinion of the magazine Ukrainian Canadian. The photo is of Bratun' with Ukrainian Canadian's editor Mitch Sago.

A134. Briuhhen, Volodymyr. "The noon of creative maturity: Mykola Lukash is 50 years old." / Volodymyr Bryuhen. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.2 (February 1970): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 December 1969): 3].

A tribute to Mykola Lukash, translator of Flaubert, Goethe, Lorca, Boccaccio, Verlaine, Burns - all from their original languages into Ukrainian. The Digest's title: "Outstanding Ukrainian translator praised".

A135. Briuhhen, Volodymyr. "Seven poems and a fragment." / Volodymyr Bryuggen. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.9 (September 1969): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 July 1969): 3].

About Ivan Drach's poems "The beginning of Whitman" published in the May issue of Vitchyzna. Says the critic Briuhhen: "Here we will not find words-puzzles and images- charades which tear asunder the reader's defenseless imagination. This was the poet's child outfit which does not fit the adult poet, grown to his present size. Here nothing is left of the clever, whimsical game; instead, we find attempts to understand and transmit the existential and creative originality of the American poet, Walt Whitman." The Digest's title: "Drach acclaimed for fragment published in Vitchyzna."

A136. Briukhovets'kyi, V. "The starry orchards of poetry: in the writer's laboratory. An interview taken by V. Bryukhovetskyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.10 (October 1976): 18-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 August 1976): 2].

The interview is with Mykola Vasylovych Khomychevs'kyi (Khomychevs'kyy) who writes under the pseudonym Borys Ten. Borys Ten is known for his translations, primarily from the classics, of such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Plato. In answering the questions posed by Briukhovets'kyi, Borys Ten discusses his early life and the multilingual environment in which he grew up, his musical training in Moscow, his Ukrainian translations of many libretti of the great operas, his translation of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey". The Digest's title: "Interview with classics translator Borys Ten".

A137. Brock, Peter. "Ivan Vahylevych (1811-1866) and the Ukrainian national identity." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.2 (Summer 1972): 153-189.

Unlike the other two members of the Ruthenian Triad (Rus'ka Triitsia), Markiian Shashkevych and Iakiv Holovats'kyi, Ivan Vahylevych, according to Brock, "suffered neglect at the hands of historians" and was condemned as one "who betrayed Ukrainianism and went over to the Poles." Brock examines a variety of biographical and bibliographical sources and concludes that Ivan Vahylevych, despite "his advocacy of a political alliance with the Poles" was "a Ukrainian cultural nationalist bent on defending the independent status of his native language and literature and their right to develop alongside the other Slavic tongues." A French abstract of the article appears on p.190.

A138. "Budyak, Yuriy (real name Pokos, Yuriy Yakovlevich)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 94.

Eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer and poet Iurii Budiak (b.1879, d.1938).

A139. "Bugayko, Tatyana Fedorovna". Promonent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 96.

About the Ukrainian literary critic and methodologist Tatiana Buhaiko (31 lines).

A140. Burachynska, Lidia. "Olha Kobylans'ka's diary." Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 270-271.

English summary of an article in Ukrainian on pp. 27-47. Burachynska discusses an unpublished diary of Ol'ha Kobylians'ka, written in German and covering eight years (from 1 November 1883 to 12 March 1891). According to the summary, the diary shows the writer's "aspirations, expectations and doubts", but there is little discussion of Kobylians'ka's works written at the time.

A141. Burachynskyj, Roxolana Maria. "The theme of freedom in the life and works of Marko Vovčok." Dissertation Abstracts International. 38.3 (September 1977): 1445-A.

An abstract of a 1977 Ph.D. dissertation at the Vanderbilt University which is characterized as "a chronological study of the theme of social and inner freedom in the Ukrainian and Russian works of Marko Vovčok." The author considers Marko Vovchok "the first professional woman writer in 19th century Ukrainian and Russian literature to introduce the theme of the emancipation of women..." The dissertation, 289 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order No. 77-19365.

A142. Buriak, Borys. "Contemporaneity and the esthetic position of the artist." / Borys Buryak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.2 (February 1970): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (10 January 1970): 3-4].

Literary experts speak of innovations in the form of the novel in the works of foreign writers, but fail to see these innovations in their own literature, says Buriak. He claims that "internal monologue" for the discovery of which Joyce is given credit, "was used much earlier in Russian literature by Dostoyevsky and L. Tolstoy, as well as in Ukrainian, by Kotsyubyns'kyy, Franko and others." "On what basis do certain other scholars consider R. Musil to be the 'father' of the intellectual novel, rather than the authors of War and Peace or What to do?" askes Buriak. Literaturna Ukraina is accused of "inept theorizing" with respect to M. Stel'makh's novel Duma pro tebe. The Digest's title reads: "'Subjectivistic tastes' laid to Literaturna Ukraina."

A143. Buriak, Borys. "On positive impulses." / Borys Buryak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.4 (April 1969): 16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 February 1969): 1].

Buriak decries the lack of popularity of humanities among the young. "We should not tolerate shallowsness and lack of significant content in literature.... Agriculture requires mechanization, but literature does not", says Buriak. His address was delivered at the Third Plenum of Ukrainian Writers' Union Executive Board. The Digest's title: "Critic decries 'machanization' in literature."

A144. Buriak, Borys. "The weakness of anti-Communism and literature." / Borys Buryak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (28 January 1972): 3-4].

The Digest's title: "Russification of non-Russian literatures denied." "...everyone in the anti-communist camp," says Buriak, "strives to pass judgement on socialist realism... they distort our methods and falsify our literature..." As examples, the author cites Suchasna literatura v URSR (without naming its author Ivan Koshelivets'), and C.A. Manning's Ukrainian Literature and History of Ukraine.

A145. Buriak, Borys. "Young artists and contemporaneity." / Borys Buryak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.5 (May 1972): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (21 March 1972): 2].

Buriak spoke at the Second Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. Young writers works on industrial themes, says Buriak, are characterized by descriptiveness, illustrativeness and repetition. In some cases, they seem to be "an inferior limitation of the 'production' novel..." apparently 'transplanted from the 1930's. The fact that young writers avoid longer prose works, says Buriak, attracts the attention of "nationalistic researchers" abroad. Buriak cites Pelenski [Pelenskyy] [cf. A1143], who concluded, allegedly, that young writers "are indifferent to major social problems..." and "choose small forms and reject the novel which requires the development of important social themes." Digest's title: "Critic warns against reemergence of 1930's 'production' novel."

A146. "Buriak, Borys Spyrydonovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 183.

Eighteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about Borys Buriak (born 1913), writer, critic and literary scholar.

A147. Burkatov, Boris. "Alexander Korneichuk." Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 165-166. port. on 166.

An outline of Oleksandr Korniichuk's work, in an issue devoted to Soviet Ukrainian literature. "Whatever subject the author handles," says Burkatov about the playwright, "he invariably evokes a lively response in the souls of the millions of people who watch and read his plays."

A148. "Burlaka, Fedor Nikolaevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 100.

Bio-bibliographical data about the writer Fedir Burlaka, b. 1902. (18 lines).

A149. Burlakov, S. "Meeting of Dnipropetrovs'k critics." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.6 (June 1969): 22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 May 1969): 4].

About a conference of literary and theater critics in Dnipropetrovs'k where addresses were made by F. Zalata and I. Lutsenko. Says Burlakov: "We need criticism which is armed with a true Leninist understanding of art, criticism that will not compromise..." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Dnipropetrovsk critics warned against nationalism."

A150. Burliai, Iu.S. "Oleinik, Stepan Ivanovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 18 (1978): 429. Biblio.

About the poet Stepan Oliinyk, born 1908. "Oleinik's poetry is noted for its topicality, satirical wit, political commitment, and rich Ukrainian humor." (16 lines).

A151. Burliai, Iu.S. "Pavlychko, Dmitro (Dmitrii) Vasil'evich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 19 (1978): 363. Biblio.

Dmytro Pavlychko's poetry, according to the author, "deals with the new life in the reunified Western Ukraine, the unmasking of Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists, and the struggle for peace." Pavlychko was born in 1929. (18 lines).

A152. "Buryak, Boris Spiridonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 100.

Bio-bibliographical data about Borys Buriak, Ukrainian literary critic and writer, born 1913. (29 lines).

A153. Bushman, Ir. "Korneychuk, Aleksandr Yevdokimovich." Portraits of Prominent USSR Personalities. 2.2 (April 1969): 75-79. Port. p.76.

A detailed biography of Oleksandr Korniichuk, born 25 May 1905. "In Stalin's time", says Bushman, Korneychuk was one of Stalin's most loyal followers, as a writer, as a member of government and as a public figure." His 1933 play "Zahybel' eskadry", according to Bushman, "dealt with revolutionary seamen and the scuttling (on Lenin's orders) of the Black Sea Squadron." It brought Korniichuk recognition and a prize and, says Bushman, "From this time on Korneychuk began to be guided by the Party's current campaign in his choice of subjects." His next play "Platon Krechet", according to Bushman, "illustrated the problem of the Soviet intelligentsia with which the Party was faced in the 30's. From a literary and dramatic standpoint, this was the most successful of Korneychuk's works." The author finds Korniichuk's speech at the Second Writers' Congress of the USSR in 1954 which has elements of cautious criticism and self-criticism, "a most intriguing document". In 1954, says Bushman, Korniichuk and his wife Wanda Wasilewska, who wrote in Polish, "were held up as examples of artists who were attentive to social criticism and who corrected their major defects." Korniichuk's 1954 play "Kryla" portrayed, says Bushman, "a new type of leader" "whose character had much in common with that of Khrushchev." Korniichuk was awarded three Lenin prizes and numerous other honors. In 1961 he was elected a member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. The article provides 32 lines of bibliographical sources and Korniichuk's address which is given as Verkhovnyi Soviet of the Ukrainian SSR.

A154. Bushman, Ir. "Stelmakh, Mikhail Afanas'yevich." Portraits of Prominent USSR Personalities. 2.4 (October 1969): 232-234. Port. on 233.

A silhouette of the novelist Mykhailo Stel'makh (born 14 August 1912) with some comments about his major works. The 1957 publication of the novel Krov liuds'ka - ne vodytsia, says Bushman, "brought Stelmakh wide renown. This novel, about the establishment of Soviet rule in the Ukraine, won Khrushchev's personal approval." About Pravda i kryvda / Marko Bezsmertnyi (1962) Bushman says: "The novel is an interesting blend of realism and folklore fairy-tale elements, and is aimed against the personality cult. The novel's fame was further increased by the author's stage adaptation." Bushman provides the following characteristics of Stel'makh and his style: "Stelmakh's prose is lyrical, wide-ranging and closely linked with the folklore tradition. Stelmakh writes intensively in irregular bouts. His scripts are always handwritten, since he cannot bear to hear the sound of the typewriter. Although he frequently stresses how essential it is for a writer to maintain a notebook, his own notebook is a most sporadic affair. He sits down to write with a ready-made plan, which he only seldom alters. Stelmakh considers that the ideas a writer preaches should jibe fully with his personal life." The article gives also 12 lines of bibliographical sources and an address for Stel'makh at the headquarters of the Writers' Union of Ukraine (Kyiv, Ordzonikidze 2).

A155. Butych, Ivan. "A treasury of literature and art." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.7 (July 1966): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (17 May 1966): 4].

The author, director of the scientific publishing department of the Bureau of Archives of the Ukrainian SSR'S Council of Ministers, discusses the plans for the Central State Archive-Museum of Literature and Art being built in Kyiv on Volodymyrska street no.22. Digest's supplied title: "Plan central archive for arts and letters."

A156. Buyniak, Victor O. "Marko Vovchok and Leo Tolstoi." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.2 (Summer 1972): 300-313.

According to Buyniak, Marko Vovchok met Leo Tolstoi in Paris in February 1861. Tolstoi's ideas regarding the education of peasants had considerable influence on Marko Vovchok. Tolstoi invited her to participate in his pedagogical journal Iasnaia poliana, but no contributions by Marko Vovchok ever appeared in that publication. Among some possible reasons for this Buyniak points out Vovchok's much more revolutionary social and feminist attitudes which might have conflicted with Tolstoi's pacifist philosophy. A French summary of the article appears on p. 314.

A157. "Buzko, Dmitriy Ivanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 100.

Eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about the Ukrainian writer Dmytro Buz'ko (b.1891, d. 18 April 1943).

A158. "By common effort. The Presidium of the Association of Writers of Ukraine in a discussion of the school program in Ukrainian literature." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.1 (January 1966): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (30 November 1965): 1-4].

Participants of the meeting (A. Ishchuk, Iu. Smolych, B. Antonenko-Davydovych, M. Mytsenko, L. Zabashta, I. Le, L. Novychenko) expressed an apprehension about "a diminishing interest in the study of our language and literature", about bad distribution of books, and the "negative results of making the schools technical". The Digest's supplied title: "Writers analyze draft literature program for schools".

A159. "Bychko, Valentin Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968).

Forty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Valentyn Bychko.

A160. "Bychko, Valentyn Vasyl'ovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 197-198.

Valentyn Bychko (born 1912) wrote mainly for children and young people. (19 lines of bio- bibliographical data).

A161. Byshovets', V.Ye. "Philosophy at the Kiev Mohyla Academy. Teofan Prokopovych." / V. Ye Byshovets', V.M. Nichyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.1 (January 1971): 16-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Folosofs'ka dumka 3 (May-June 1970): 92-94].

About a two-volume Ukrainian edition of Teofan Prokopovych's philosophical works, which is being prepared by the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Sciences, Institute of Philosophy, the Lviv University Department of Classical Philosophy and philologists from other republican universities. Prokopovych's literary works, his plays and poems, his lectures on poetics and rhetoric are characterized by the authors as "life-asserting; they urge to search for happiness in this life and show a deep understanding of the most subtle aspirations of the human spirit and the principles of their expression in art." Digest's title: "Prepare Prokopovych's works for publication."

A162. "The calling and the obligation of an artist." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.7 (July 1976): 22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 May 1976): 3].

The Digest's title: "Kiev writers study Marxism-Leninism". The unsigned article reports on the year-long seminars and lecture series in Marxism-Leninism held by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine for the writers of Kyiv.

A163. "The calling of the writer and the critic." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (12 June 1973): 3].

The Digest's title: "Commission on criticism discusses ideological shortcomings in literary works". The meeting of the Committe on Criticism of the Ukrainian Writers' Union was held on 6 June with Leonid Novychenko presiding. Poets S. Zinchuk, L. Horlach, Iryna Zhylenko were criticized for ideological narrow-mindedness, privacy, political indifference, bookishness and/or restricted subject matter. Lydiia Maliarenko [Lydia Malyarenko] was criticized for her positive evaluation of M. Nekhoda's novel Kholodnyi iar. Under discussion were also the need for better coverage of the working class theme, for greater contacts, study and translations of "fraternal literatures". I. Zub, M. Lohvynenko, M. Ostryk, I. Soldatenko, M. Leshchenko, S. Kryzhanivskyi and P. Mysnyk participated in the discussions.

A164. "Canadian protest mushrooms for jailed Ukrainian writter [sic]." ABN Correspondence. 25.5 (September-October 1974): 30.

A news report about various action in Canada in support of Valentyn Moroz, currently a prisoner in the USSR.

A165. Carynnyk, Marco. "Vasyl Stus." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 1.1 (Fall 1976): 62-67.

Vasyl' Stus, according to this article, was sentenced to seven years in labour camps and three years in exile by a Soviet court in September 1972 for "systematically preparing, preserving, and distributing slanderous anti-Soviet documents which defamed the Soviet system". But Stus, says Carynnyk, "deserves our attention as a poet no less than as a critic or a political prisoner." Carynnyk's article serves as an introduction to a selection of Stus's poetry which appears (in the original Ukrainian) on pp.68-71 of the same issue. "Vasyl Stus will probably not win his place in Ukrainian literary history by introducing new poetic devices or methods... but he has already created a body of poetry which treats the sum of his experiences sincerely and without any false intonations", says Carynnyk.

A166. Carynnyk, Marco. "Vasyl Stus: a preliminary bibliography." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 1.1 (Fall 1976): 72-74.

A chronological listing of Stus' poems, articles and appeals published from 1963 to 1976. Except for a few translations, most entries are given in transliterated Ukrainian.

A167. "The case of Valentin Moroz: Valentin Moroz'z defense speech." Survey. 18.1 (82) (Winter 1972): 219-222.

The text of Valentyn Moroz's speech in his own defense, apparently, at his trial in November 1970, with a brief biographical note from the editors. There is no indication of the source of the document.

A168. "Catheryna Hrynevych." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 26.11/12 (November/December 1975): 26.

A brief unsigned biographical note about the writer Katria Hrynevycheva.

A169. Celewych, Ulana. "Lesya Ukrainka." ABN Correspondence. 22.3 (May-June 1971): 21-22. port.

A popularly written brief biography of Lesia Ukrainka on the occasion of the poet's birth centennial.

A170. "Chagovets, Vsevolod Andriiovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 242.

Vsevolod Chahovets' (1877-1950), Ukrainian theatrical scholar, was the author of scenarios, librettos and plays. (14 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A171. "Chaikovs'kyi, Andrii Yakovych." Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet Literature. 3 (1979): 243.

Andrii Chaikovs'kyi (1857-1935), according to this 1/3 page encyclopedic entry, "wrote novelettes reflecting realistic scenes of Galician life". Soviet critics are credited with the claim that his "conservatism and the nationalistic narrowmindedness of his world view were the cause of his inimical attitude toward the October Revolution".

A172. Challis, Natalie. "Divine folly in old Kievan literature: the Tale of Isaac the Cave Dweller." / Natalie Challis and Horace W. Dewey. Slavic and East European Journal. 22.3 (Fall 1978): 255-264. Notes.

"Russia's earliest surviving story about a holy fool" - according to the authors - "deals with Isaac the Cave-Dweller (Isaakij Pečernik), a monk in the Kiev Cave Monastery in the early decades after the monastery's founding..." The article gives a detailed summary of this story, which the authors consider "a well-constructed and well-narrated piece of literature", "teleological" in nature. The message of the story, according to Challis and Dewey, is as follows: "Divine folly is valued above solitary asceticism; jurodstvo can help "cure" a monk who has succumbed to prelest while a hermit. But the highest service to God is coenobitic monasticism."

A173. Chelak, M. "Master of obscurity". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.8 (August 1970): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Prapor 3 (March 1970): 92-95].

The author takes issue with Russian and Ukrainian émigre writers V. Zinkovskyy, M. Lossky, D. Chyzhevs'kyi and the authors of Entsyklopediia ukrainoznavstva, who, in his opinion, assert that Hryhorii Skovoroda's outlook is permeated with mysticism, that he was influenced by the Church fathers, by medieval and modern mysticism, while ignoring such facts, says Chelak, as Skovoroda's rejection of "dogmatism and the ritualistic side of Christianity", his defense of free thinking and support of democratic thought. Chelak goes as far as to claim that Skovoroda "laid the foundation of atheism in Ukraine in the materialist and atheistic tendencies of his philosophy." The Digest's title: "Emigré writers accused of distorting Skovoroda".

A174. "Chendrey [sic], Ivan Mikhaylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 106.

Thirty lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Ivan Chendei, born 1922.

A175. Cheremshyns'kyy, O. "What did they sing two centuries ago?" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.4 (April 1973): 15-16. [Full text. Literaturna Ukraina? [no source given] (18 February 1973): 3].

I. Hereta, director of the Ternopil Museum of Regional Studies, while working on the creation of a museum commemorating V. Hnatiuk in the scholar's native village of Velesniv, discovered two unique manuscript collections of folklore. The collections, the first - compiled by Z. Dolenha-Khodakovs'kyy (1784-1825), the second - compiled by O. Bodyans'kyy (1808- 1877) were discovered among the holdings of H. Bodnar and the artist H. Smol's'kyy.

A176. Cherkashyn, R. "On the eve of the golden jubilee." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (1 August 1972): 3].

The Digest's title: "Kharkiv Theater stages Kulish classic". A review of the play "Patetychna sonata" by Mykola Kulish produced at the T.H. Shevchenko Dramatic Theater in Kharkiv and directed by B. Meshkis. Says Cherkashyn: "M. Kulish's extremely intricate and profound play "Patetychna sonata", which is written in a beautiful imagery-laden language, remains a literary masterpiece that is worthy of new attempts at modern stage presentation. The Kharkiv Academic Theater's production of this play is one such serious, albeit not always successful, attempt..."

A177. Chernenko, Alexandra. "The birth of a new spiritual awareness." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 16.1 (Spring 1974): 73-98.

Canadian Slavonic Papers published in the Summer 1972 issue Danylo Struk's article about Hryhorii Chubai's poem Vidshukuvannia prychetnoho ("The search for an accomplice"), with the full text of the poem in Struk's English translation [cf. A1469, T036]. Chernenko takes issue with some of Struk's statements, "corrects" some parts of his translation of the poem, and proposes her own interpretation of Chubai's work. According to Chernenko, "the spiritual flavour of Chubai's poem can be found in Hryhorii S. Skovoroda's mystical philosophy." In Chernenko's view, "Chubai's poem gives an image of human striving for the renewal of psychic wholeness and 'what it is that holds all men together'. This is the main reason why his small and modest poem has such unique value." While it may be "impossible to explain in detail the whole poem in a rational or logical way," says Chernenko, "...one can use a comparative method based on Jung's empirical findings about the human psyche and Skovoroda's mystical philosophy and his symbolism" to guide the reader "toward an intuitive perception of the meaning of Chubai's poem." She proceeds to do so, by analyzing the Jungian "uniting symbols of archetypal nature" present in Chubai's poem. Fragments of Chubai's poem in Struk's translation (some 177 lines) are quoted to illustrate the points made in the article. A French summary of the article appears on p. 98.

A178. Cherniavs'kyi, V. "Evenings of Ukrainian poetry in the USA." / V. Chernyavs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.2 (February 1967): 21-22. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 December 1966): 2].

A news report about poetry readings by D. Pavlychko and I. Drach at Rutgers University (Newark), La Salle College (Philadelphia), University of Southern Illinois (Carbondale), Harvard, New York and Columbia Universities. D. Pavlychko and I. Drach were in New York at the 21st session of the U.N. General Assembly as members of the official delegation of the Ukrainian SSR. The Digest's supplied title: "Kiev poets-diplomats tour U.S. campuses".

A179. Chikovani, Simon. "Maxim Rylsky (1895-1964)." Tr. by Michael Moor. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 158-161.

Reminiscences of Maksym Ryl's'kyi by the eminent Georgian poet Chikovani in an issue devoted to Ukrainian literature and art. Chikovani recalls "many happy meetings" with Ryl's'kyi, comments on Ryl's'kyi's poetry and his translations from foreign literatures and says: "Maxim Rylsky was a versatile poet and a man of great spiritual wealth. He was also a tireless worker and, in spite of his advanced years, never lost the fire of poetic inspiration."

A180. "Children are the great joy of life." Ukrainian Canadian. 31.620 (114) (March 1979): 32-33.

An unsigned article about Taras Shevchenko's love and concern for children.

A181. Chopyk, Dan B. "In search of a lost past: the Ukrainian poetry of Yar Slavutych." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.1 (Spring 1979): 50-63.

Chopyk provides a detailed biography of the poet, discusses Slavutych's main themes as well as his language and poetic mastery and analyzes Slavutych's books one by one in chronological order of their publication: Spivaie kolos (1945), Homin vikiv (1946), Pravdonostsi (1948), Spraha (1950), Oaza (1960), Maiestat (1962), Trofei (1963), Zavoiovnyky prerii (1968), Mudroshchi mandriv (1972). According to Chopyk: "Slavutych's Ukrainian poetry is innovative both thematically and technically". The article is interspersed with brief quotations of poetry in the author's or Morse Manly's translations.

A182. Chopyk, Dan B. "The making and unmaking of a Soviet bureaucrat." Nationalities Papers. 2.1 (Spring 1974): 14-18.

A review article of Oles' Honchar's novel Sobor. Chopyk characterizes Sobor as "a socialist realism novel" and defines socialist realism as an attempt "to depict reality in its revolutionary development, i.e. in a dialectic development which forges the truth from contradictions". Writers of socialist realism, says Chopyk, "must keep in mind that literature should help people to understand themselves, ... uplift their faith, ... bring out a desire to stand for the truth... fight banality and baseness, ... help people to find some good in themselves, ... stir shame, anger, and nobleness so as to show that humanity can be beautiful." Chopyk focuses on two major protagonists in the novel - Volodka Loboda, the negative hero, and Mykola Bahlai, the positive hero. The portrayal of Loboda, a small party official, amounts, in Chopyk's view, to Honchar's "sharpest criticism of Soviet reality".

A183. Chorney, Stephen S. "Don Juan motif in Lesia Ukrainka's dramaturgy." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 156-166.

A comparison of three dramas: the Spanish playwright's Tirso de Molina's "El burlador de Sevilla " (1630), the Russian version of Alexander Pushkin's "Kamennyj gost" (1839) and Lesia Ukrainka's "Kaminnyi hospodar" (1912). Says Chorney about Lesia Ukrainka's Kaminnyi hospodar: It "was a product not only of her own rejection of Ukrainian ethnographic theater, but also it was a woman's attempt to interpret this worldwide Don Juanian motif in the psycho-sociological spirit of Ibsen-Nietzsche philosophy at the beginning of the 20th century."

A184. Chorney, Stephen S. "350 years since M. Smotrytsky's fundamental work on languages." Ukrainian Quarterly. 26.3-4 (Autumn-Winter 1970): 301-303.

Meletii Smotryts'kyi (b.1578) is characterized by the author as a "Ukrainian writer- polemicist, philologist and church worker." His Grammar, according to Chorney, "ushered in a new era in the study of phonological structure not only of East Slavic languages but also of the languages of other Slavs. This grammar was the only textbook used in the schools for many years."

A185. Chornomorsky, A. "Insufficient action in defense of Moroz." ABN Correspondence. 25.4 (July-August 1974): 24-45.

An appeal to instensify actions on behalf of Valentyn Moroz, a Ukrainian historian and writer, currently a political prisoner in the USSR.

A186. Chornovil, Viacheslav. "Essay" / by V. Chornovil. In Quest For Justice: Protest and Dissent in the Soviet Union Today. Ed. by Abraham Brumberg. New York: Praeger [©1970]. 183-200.

In a letter dated 17 January 1968 and addressed to the procurator general of the Ukrainian SSR, the chairman of the Supreme Court of the Ukrainian SSR, and the chairman of the Committee of State Security of the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSR, Chornovil comments on recent breaches of justice involving arrests and imprisonment of members of Ukrainian intelligentsia, including several Ukrainian writers. They were accused of "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda" under article 62 of the Criminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR. "In its present version", says Chornovil, "article 62 completely contradicts the freedoms that are guaranteed to Soviet citizens in the Constitution of the USSR." "If anyone criticizes current nationality policies for their departure from Leninist norms, then he (even if mistaken) has every right to do so, according to the Constitution of the USSR...", says Chornovil. "It seems possible to apply the charge of 'slanderous fabrications' to all statements that do not coincide with official directives..." Chornovil provides specific examples of unlawful procedures and practices, of methods used by the KGB (informers, unlawful searches, monitoring of conversations) to expose what are called the "especially dangerous state criminals", of methods used in preliminary investigations, of violations of procedural norms at trials, of harsh sentences in corrective labor camps used as punishment. A brief biographical note about Viacheslav Chornovil appears on p.464.

A187. Chornovil, Viacheslav. "My trial". / Vyacheslav Chornovil. Index on Censorship. 5.1 (Spring 1976): 57-69. port.

Documentation on Chornovil in this issue of the Index on Censorship is published with a page-long introduction by the editors in connection with the Nicholas Tomalin Award given to Chornovil in the Autumn of 1975. The award honors "journalists whose freedom of action and speech is threatened." The document itself includes the abridged text of the April 1973 judgment in Chornovil's trial, his commentary on it written around January 1975 and his letter addressed to N.V. Podgorny, Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR in which Chornovil renounces his Soviet citizenship. Chornovil's commentary, according to the editorial note, "throws considerable light on the workings of the extreme form of Soviet censorship: long years of imprisonment for writings arbitrarily deemed by the authorities to be anti-Soviet". Chornovil's commentary includes quotations of two poems by I. Senyk ["Around Bratsk", 14 lines, p.61,63; "Square faces", 16 lines, p.63], one poem by Iryna Kalynets ["Instead of a dedication (They will crucify you and curse you)", 12 lines, p.63] and a folk song ["The Cossacks fought", 12 lines, p.63]. There is a b/w portrait of Chornovil on p.69.

A188. Chornovil, Viacheslav. "A voice from the Soviet prison camp." . Vyacheslav M. Chornovil. Ukrainian Quarterly. 24.1 (Spring 1968): 13- 21.

Excerpts from a letter of V. Chornovil addressed to the attorney-general of the Ukrainian SSR with a longer editorial note. The letter was part of Chornovil's manuscript which was smuggled from the USSR to the West in late 1967 and included materials revealing details about secret trials of young Ukrainian intellectuals, among them a number of Ukrainian Soviet writers, poets and artists ("Portraits of 20 so-called criminals", "Violations of socialist legality", etc.) Chornovil's manuscript was eventually published in the West as Chornovil Papers [cf. B004].

A189. Chornovil, Viacheslav. "Vyacheslav Chornovil has renounced his Soviet citizenship." ABN Correspondence. 26.5 (September-October 1975): inside back cover, port.

Text of Chornovil's petition addressed to the chief of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. The petition is dated 1 March 1975 and contains Chornovil's renunciation of his USSR citizenship. Chornovil's portrait appears on the cover of this issue.

A190. "Chornovil, Vyacheslav Maksymovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 24-25. port.

Twenty-four lines of biographical data about the journalist and writer Viacheslav Chornovil with a focus on his imprisonment by the Soviet regime.

A191. "Chornovil transferred to Lviv." ABN Correspondence. 26.1 (January-February 1975): 38.

A news item about the transfer from Mordovian concentration camp to Lviv of Viacheslav Chornovil, "apparently for further interrogation."

A192. "Chronology of important dates in Lesya Ukrainka's life and work." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.532 (53) (February 1971): 40-42. illus.

Important events in Lesia Ukrainka's life and work listed in chronological order from 1871 to 1913.

A193. "Chubay, Hryhoriy". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 25.

Hryhorii Chubai is characterized as "a poet and artist-decorator", arrested in 1972. No other biographical data (4 lines).

A194. "Chuprynka, Grigoriy Avramovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 115.

Bio-bibliographical data (18 lines) about the "modernist poet" Hryts'ko Chuprynka, born 15 September 1879 and executed 28 August 1921.

A195. Coleman, Arthur Prudden. "A new golden age for Ukraine." Ukrainian Quarterly. 26.1 (Spring 1970): 36-47.

Author of the pioneering study A Brief Survey of Ukrainian literature (1936) [cf. ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B14], A.P. Coleman shares his reflections about the progress Ukrainian studies have made in America. He talks about Ukraine as a land that has enchanted writers such as Sebastian Klonowicz (Roxolania), Antoni Malczewski, Nikolai Gogol, Taras Shevchenko. Of special interest is Coleman's memoir about Percival Cundy, and Cundy's pioneer efforts in translating Franko and Shevchenko into English. Fifteen lines from Shevchenko's poem "The Dream (Flying, I watch it from above)" are quoted on p.43 in what seems to be the author's own translation. The reflections were, apparently, a speech or a lecture delivered at some unidentified occasion.

A196. "A Colloquium Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of Skovoroda's Birth." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2 (1971-1972): 83-88. Biblio.

Summary of three papers on Hryhorii Skovoroda presented on 4 May 1972 and of the discussion which followed. The three papers were: "H.S. Skovoroda: his place in intellectual tradition" by John-Paul Himka, a PhD. candidate in history at the University of Michigan; "Skovoroda's philosophy of man" by Taras Zakydalsky, Ph.D. candidate in philosophy at Bryn Mawr College, and "Skovoroda in subsequent literature" by Richard Hantula, Ph.D. candidate in Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University. Topics under discussion included: obstacles which have long impeded an assessment of Skovoroda's place in intellectual tradition: his obscure style, varied interpretations of his philosophy, falsifications of his texts, inadequate biographical/archival research, Skovoroda's concept of "heart, outer heart and Christ", the question of his language, anecdotes and legends about Skovoroda and literary works about him.

A197. "Commemorating the 75th birth anniversary of Volodimir Sosyura (1898-1965)." Ukraine. 1(13) (1973): 11. port.

This tribute to Volodymyr Sosiura consists of a b/w portrait of the poet, his poem "Above the busy cranes and trucks" (16 lines) in an unattributed translation and an excerpt from Andrii Malyshko's [Andriy Malishko in text] reminiscences about Sosiura.

A198. "Communique." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 2. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (11 February 1972): 4].

The Digest's title: "Svitlychnyy, Chornovil and Sverstyuk arrested for anti-Soviet activities." News item about the three writers who "have been charged with conducting activities hostile to the socialist order and in conjunction with the Dobosh case." Iaroslav Dobosh was a Belgian citizen arrested previously "for conducting enemy activities" on the territory of the Ukrainian SSR.

A199. "Concerning the awarding of the T.H. Shevchenko State Prize of the Ukrainian SSR. Resolution of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine and of the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSR." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.4 (April 1974): 4-5. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (10 March 1974): 1].

Official announcement. In literature, the prize was awarded to Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi for his novels Pervomist and Smert' v Kyievi. The Digest's title: "1974 Shevchenko prizes awarded".

A200. "Congressman Koch attacks Russia for Dzyuba." ABN Correspondence 25.1 (January-February 1974): 29-30.

A statement of Edward I. Koch, Democratic Congressman from the 18th Congressional district of New York, published originally in The Congressional Record of November 14, 1973 and reprinted here with some preliminary editorial comments. Koch's statement is subheaded: "Ivan Dzyuba: a Ukrainian hero" and relates the story of Dziuba's arrest, sentencing and recantation. "If we cannot expect Russia to reverse its habits of oppression, surely we can do all that is peaceably possible to encourage it to allow those subject to brutalization to leave."

A201. "Contemporaneity - the chief guide." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 4-5. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (11 May 1971): 1-2].

The Digest's title: "Kiev writers' organization elects officers." The election meeting of the Kyiv and Kyiv oblast writers was held on 6 April. Vasyl Kozachenko reported on ideological directives for writers in the light of the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of Ukraine. Oles Honchar spoke of the readers' demands for good books and about the need for a new literary journal for the Kyiv writers. Iurii Zbanats'kyi was elected chairman of the Executive Board of the Kyiv writers organization. A list of other elected officials is provided.

A202. "Contrary to historical truth. Concerning R. Andriashyk's novel 'Poltva'." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.2 (February 1971): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (12 January 1971): 2].

The Digest's title: "Ideological and artistic errors ascribed to new work." Commission on criticism and literary theory and the Sector on prose of the Kyiv writers organization held a joint meeting on 6 January 1971 to discuss R.Andriashyk's novel "Poltva", published in the August and September issues of the journal Prapor. P. Hurinenko, D. Bedzyk, M. Rud', M. Lohvynenko, O. Musiienko [Musiyenko], L. Novychenko, S. Shakhovs'kyi [Shakhovskyy] and V. Vilnyi [Vilnyy] participated in the discussion. According to this report, they agreed that "unfortunately, Roman Andriyashek's new work cannot be considered an achievement, but that, on the contrary, the novel contains serious ideological and artistic errors."

A203. Corbett, D.M. "The brave generation. Young Ukrainian intellectuals fight for human and national rights." Forum. 1.4 (Winter 1967/1968): 13-14; 2.1 (Spring 1968): 2-5, 30-31. illus.

About the documents secretly acquired from Ukraine and published recently in the West revealing the 1965 searches and arrests in the USSR of Ukrainian intellectuals, among them writers Michael Masiutko, Ivan Dziuba, Ivan Svitlychnyi, Viacheslav Chornovil, Sviatoslav Karavanskyi et al.. A photograph of Ivan Dziuba with his wife appears on p.4 of the Spring 1968 issue.

A204. Cox, Gary. "Toward a system of poetic parallelism in the Slovo o polku Igoreve." Ulbandus Review. 1.2 (Spring 1978): 3-15. Biblio. footnotes.

A study of poetic techniques in the Slovo o polku Ihorevim with over one hundred lines of quotations from Slovo (with the original quoted in transliterated form and line- by-line literal prose translations). The author's conclusions are as follows: "...although it is difficult to demonstate the existence of metrical verse patterns in the Slovo, the text exhibits some elements of a poetic system based on thematic and syntactic parallelism. Specific tropes used in this system include two-, three- and four-part parallels. Constructions having an even number of parallel sections tend to add a non-parallel section, at the beginning or end, which acts as a focal point for the other, parallel clauses. The four-part parallel with introduction or conclusion is the most productive in the work, and there are indications that three-part parallels may have been modified to fit this pattern."

A205. Cracraft, James. "Feofan Prokopovich: a bibliography of his works". Oxford Slavonic Papers. n.s. 8 (1975): 1-36.

Says Cracraft in his eight-page introduction: "Until now a comprehensive list of Prokopovich's works has not been compiled (or at least one has not been published) - a critical gap for students whether of language and literature or of history that the present bibliography hopes to fill. It should confirm, among other things, that for his time and place the range of Prokopovich's literary efforts was quite astonishingly broad; moreover, that his writings were, very possibly, the most widely read of any author's in eighteenth-century Russia." The bibliography itself contains 185 items classified into the following categories: Miscellanies and collected editions (1-8), Sermons and speeches (9-78), Historical, legal, and/or political works (excluding speeches) (79-109), Theological, catechetical and devotional works (excluding sermons) (110-144), Poetry (145-161), Other works (162-170), Letters (171-175), Apocrypha (176-185). Teofan Prokopovych was born in 1681 and died in 1736.

A206. Cracraft, James. "Prokopovyč's Kievan period reconsidered." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974-1975. 5 (1974-1975): 60-63. Biblio.

Summary of a paper delivered by University of Illinois at Chicago professor James Cracraft and of the discussion which followed the presentation. The paper was read at the history seminar on 13 March 1975. According to this summary, the speaker took issue with Iurii Sherekh's interpretation of Teofan Prokopovych's works written in the 1705 to 1709 period as being "religious and ecclesiastical in nature" and "expressing Ukrainian national and political consciousness". Cracraft maintained, on the contrary, that "a cosmopolitan and secular spirit" is evident in these works and that Prokopovych's opposition to Mazepa was "fully consistent with his previously expressed views".

A207. Cracraft, James. "Prokopovyč's Kiev period reconsidered." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.2 (June 1978): 138-157.

Teofan Prokopovych, according to the author, "was the most original, if not the most prolific writer of his generation" and it is important to study his antecedents to better understand Prokopovych's "major historical role, namely, as Peter I.'s collaborator in creating the Russian Empire". Cracraft discusses Prokopovych's lectures on poetics at the Kyiv academy in 1705- 1706, his tragicomedy "Vladymyr", and his sermons, and argues - contrary to the views expressed by J.Šerech (George Y. Shevelov) [published in Harvard Ukrainian Studies (1954/2); see ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A629] - that "Vladymyr and the other works in question show their author to have been not only a proponent of a kind of Ukrainian nationalism, but something of an incipient ideologist of the Petrine empire, too."

A208. "Creating the literature of the Communist age. Report and election party meeting of the Kiev organization of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.12 (December 1975): 11-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 October 1975): 1-2].

Secretary of the party committee, B.Y. Chalyy delivered a report. He noted by name the various prize recipients, spoke approvingly of those "focusing on the contemporary theme", "the militant-patriotic theme", the theme of internationalism, the editorial improvements at Vitchyzna, the militant spirit and aggressive nature of newly released materials of literary criticism (such as the books Proty fal'shyvykh kontseptsii and V chadi fal'shyvykh idei). Chalyy was reelected as the party committee secretary. The Digest's title: "Writers party organizations hold report and election meetings."

A209. "Creative achievement of a translator." / L.K. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.12 (December 1966): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 November 1966): 3].

A meeting of translators held on 27 October 1966 and presided by M. Shumylo discussed Shakespeare's Sonnets in a new Ukrainian translation by Dmytro Palamarchuk. The author of this article says that the 8,000 copies of the Palamarchuk translation were sold out quickly and calls for a new printing. The Digest's title: "Sold out: new edition of Shakespeare's sonnets."

A210. "Creative reports, new prospects." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.5 (May 1966): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Dnipro. 3 (March 1966): 2-7].

This editorial in Dnipro admonishes Ukrainian writers: "The criteria of Soviet literature are a high artistic and ideological mastery and the truth of life. A real writer who wishes to present the truth of life from the position of communist ideals will reject trends of condensation of black colors and embellishment of reality." I. Bavykin's "I am going home" is singled out for adverse criticism: the work, says the editorial, "quite simply justifies the traitor of his homeland." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Writers told how to educate builders of communism."

A211. "Criticism inspired by the Party." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.4 (April 1969): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 February 1969): 1-2].

Digest's title: "Dzyuba censured again". The unsigned article is an attack on Ivan Dziuba's article about the poet V. Svidzyns'kyi published in Literaturna Ukraina [cf. A305]. Dziuba is criticized for his alleged attempt to prove the artist's "alienation" from his age and for his "disregard for the class criterion in assessing literary phenomena..."

A212. "Critics! Your Party vocation!" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (8 February 1972): 1-2].

The Digest's title: "Literaturna Ukraina admits errors in its literary criticism". The following is a verbatim quotation from the article: "The editorial board of Literaturna Ukraina admits that the faults and errors pointed out by the CC CPSU Resolution on criticism fully apply to its works as well. We are planning and realizing specific measures with respect to raising the level of criticism on the pages of our newspaper."

A213. "Crossword." Ukrainian Canadian. 22.511 (5) (March 1969): 37. illus.

A crossword puzzle based on Taras Shevchenko's life and works.

A214. "Daughter of Prometheus." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.532 (53) (February 1971): 5.

An unsigned editorial on the occasion of Lesia Ukrainka's one hundredth birthday.

A215. "Debates following the reports of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine and the Auditing Commission of the Communist Party of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.3 (March 1976): 24-25, 28, 28-29. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (12 February 1976): 2-8].

Digest's title: "Speeches in the discussion of the Congress reports". Among the participants in the discussion were V.P. Kozachenko, O.T. Honchar and M.Z. Shamota who spoke on matters related to literature. Kozachenko, first secretary of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine, spoke, among other things, against "critical realism" which some, allegedly, introduce "as a companion for the method of socialist realism" and which, in Kozachenko's opinion, "is no more and no less than ordinary defamation. Certain artists, in his view, take advantage of the relaxation of international tensions and "have begun to imitate in their works foreign opuses of openly philistine decadent nature, aiming to please the Western literary market at any cost..." "We are actively opposed to certain esthetically-minded individulas who consciously and unconsciously propound the long since rejected slogan of art for art's sake, separating form from content," says Kozachenko. Honchar, secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of the USSR and chairman of the Ukrainian Republican Committee for the Defense of Peace, spoke of the need to cultivate "a lofty sense of Soviet patriotic pride" among the young through "worthy books, paintings, plays and films." "But our artistic achievements are not being fully utilized toward this end. Shaping the mentality, the views and the ideo-esthetic tastes of Soviet people is a complex and delicate task," says Honchar. Shamota, director of the T.H. Shevchenko Institute of Literature of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Sciences, spoke about the responses to criticism by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine regarding "the series of shortcomings in the work of scientific institutions and in a number of works of literature and art." "The nature, character and specific examples of the errors committed were thoroughly analyzed at plenums of the Central Committee, at conferences of ideological workers, in the party organizations of creative unions and scientific collectives. A number of work sectors were strengthened with cadres. For all of us who work in the social sciences, literature and art, this was a profound and instructive lesson in partymindedness..." reports Shamota.

A216. "Declaration and memorandum No. 1, of the Ukrainian Public Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.1 (Spring 1977): 3-23.

This non-literary political document includes brief biographies of the founding members of the Helsinki Group, among them two prominent Ukrainian writers Mykola Rudenko and Oles' Berdnyk. In addition, there are lists of political prisoners held in Soviet concentration camps which include Ukrainian poets, writers and literary scholars.

A217. "Defend Valentyn Moroz". ABN Correspondence. 25.3 (May-June 1974): 22-23.

An appeal to the media, elected representatives, various organizations and the general public to raise their voices in defense of Moroz currently in a Soviet prison. The appeal is signed by the Canadian League for the Liberation of Ukraine and dated February 1974.

A218. Deich, Alexander. "Mikhailo Kotsyubinsky." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.565 (58) (January 1974): 36. port.

"In the psychological development of the characters of his stories", says Deich, "critics have compared Kotsyubinsky with Maupassant and Chekhov... He was akin to Chekhov in his lyricism and sometimes in his satire, and approached Maupassant in the sharpness of his psychological patterns, but the high moral quality, which has been noted by all of his most perceptive critics, was all his own." Deich considers Fata Morgana Kotsiubyns'kyi's best work. "In this novel he is seen as a writer of great talent, a meticulous craftsman who has the ability to dig into the psychology of his characters and a man who thoroughly understands the Ukrainian peasant movement..."

A219. "Delegates to the 6th Congress of the Writers of the USSR." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 27. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 April 1976): 2].

Sixty-six names listed in alphabetical order - these are delegates to the USSR Writers Congress in Moscow selected by the Writers' Union of Ukraine.

A220. Della Cava, Olha Tatiana. "Sermons of Feofan Prokopovic: Themes and style." Dissertation Abstracts International. 33.1 (July 1972): 271-A.

An abstract of a 1972 Columbia University Ph.D. dissertation. The dissertation provides an analysis of the contents and style of some sixty extant sermons of Teofan Prokopovych (1681- 1736), together with a sketch of the life of this Orthodox churchman. The author concludes - contrary to the opinion of some scholars - that Prokopovych "does not depart substantially - in structure, imagery, rhetorical and euphonic devices - from the baroque homiletic tradition of his predecessors. He does, however, criticize and avoid the more extreme and excessive stylistic devices - the anecdotes, jokes, histrionics - which transformed the baroque sermon into a form of burlesque entertainment", says the author. In her view, Prokopovych's preaching style is "marked by directness, clarity and rationality." The dissertation, 193 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no.72-19,120.

A221. "Demyan, Luka Vasilevich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968): 124.

Sixteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about Luka Demian, the short story writer born 1894.

A222. Demydov, Volodymyr. "Two different fates." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 (April 1977): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 January 1977): 3].

An article about a 1976 children's book Dva khlopchyky Smity by Hryts'ko Boiko which, in the author's view, is worthy of a literary prize. The Digest's title: "Book of childrens' poems depicting 'acute social inequalities' in U.S. nominated for literary prize."

A223. Denysenko, Serhii. "A little thing about my textbooks". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.7 (July 1967): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 June 1967): 3].

Tenth-grade student of Kyiv high school no.112 writes a critical comment about the textbook Ukrains'ka radians'ka literatura prepared by T. Buhayko, F. Buhayko and P. Mysnyk. He complains that Sosiura's lyrical poetry is not adequately represented, that a textbook for young readers should include some work of contemporary young poets, that names of some important writers are not even mentioned. Asks Denysenko: "Why does Ukrainian literature of the twenties and thirties look so impoverished, as though between the years of its formation and our time there is an abyss?" The Digest's supplied title reads: "High school senior scores school texts."

A224. Denysenko, Serhii. "School text condemned by high school student." / Serhiy Denysenko. Forum. 2.1 (Spring 1968): 21. [i.e. #5, not numbered].

Excerpt from S. Denysenko's letter published originally in Literaturna Ukraina on 6 June 1967 and digested in the Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press [cf. A223], with a lengthy editorial introduction. Denysenko, a grade 10 Kyiv high school student, complains about a textbook Ukrains'ka radians'ka literatura by T. Buhayko used in the school's curriculum. He takes issue with the negligent treatment or avoidance of such topics as Sosiura's lyric poetry, the literature of the 1920's, and contemporary Ukrainian literature of younger writers. Says Denysenko: "Why does Ukrainian literature of the twenties and thirties look so impoverished, as though between the years of its formation and our time there is an abyss?" The editorial comment characterizes Denysenko as "surprisingly mature" and his criticism as " penetrating", "interesting" and "significant."

A225. Derkach, B.A. "Vasilchenko, Stepan Vasil'evich (pseud. of S.V. Panasenko)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 4 (1974): 522-523. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 39 lines about Stepan Vasyl'chenko (1878-1932). Vasyl'chenko, according to Derkach, "protested against the tsarist persecution of elementary school teachers and described their poverty-stricken existence", "showed the creative strength of the working people and their revolutionary awakening" and "created attractive images of the young builders of a socialist world."

A226. "Desniak, Oleksa (pseud. of Aleksei Ignatovich Rudenko)". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 156. Biblio.

A 17-line note about Oleksa Rudenko who wrote under the name of Oleksa Desniak (1909- 1942). According to GSE, "Desniak portrays the life of Ukrainian kolkhoz peasants and the atmosphere of creative labor during the prewar five-year plans".

A227. "Dey, Aleksey Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968): 126.

Thirty-seven lines of bio-bibliographical data about literary critic and folklore specialist Oleksii Dei, born 1921.

A228. "A difficult but rewarding work." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.2 (February 1970): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (6 January 1970): 2]

A report about the activities of Dnipro, the major publisher of literary translations in Ukraine. The report discusses the work of seven editorial boards that prepare translations from Ukrainian literature, and translations into Ukrainian of literary works from "sister republics" and foreign countries, and the difficulties in finding qualified translators. The Digest's title: "Dnipro publishers deplore scarcity of translators."

A229. "Didenko, Vasiliy Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968): 127.

Bio-bibliographical data about the poet and journalist Vasyl Didenko, born 1937. (12 lines).

A230. "Discussing creative questions." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 March 1975): 1].

A party meeting of the Kyiv writers' organization was held to discuss the latest resolution of the Central Committee of the Comunist Party of the Soviet Union devoted to literary and art criticism. Iu. Bedzyk read a paper on "Enhancing the role of party organizations in the creative process". The Digest's title: "Writers association's party meeting focuses on ideology".

A231. "Dmiterko, Lyubomir Dmitrievich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968): 128.

A 67-line bio-bibliographical note about the poet and playwright Liubomyr Dmyterko (born 1911).

A232. Dmitriev, L.A. "Old Russian literature (late tenth through 17th centuries)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 22 (1979): 449-451.

The first half (pp.449-450) of this subsection of literature (under the general heading of Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic) provides a brief summary of the literature of Kyivan Rus', its development, genres, themes and styles.

A233. Dmyterko, Liubomyr. "Encouraging work" / Lyubomyr Dmyterko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (4 February 1972): 2].

Says Dmyterko: "... by his very calling a critic should be highly principled and unshakably honest". Unfortunately, this is not always so, since many critics are guided, according to Dmyterko, either by "unconditional friendliness" or "fierce hatred" toward the author.

A234. Dmyterko, Liubomyr. "Moscow henchman attacks Dzyuba." ABN Correspondence. 21.2 (March-April 1970): 36-38.

Excerpts from what is described in a brief editorial note as "a calumnious article by Lyubomyr Dmyterko, entitled 'Position in battle: About one writer who has found himself on the other side of the barricade', which appeared in Literaturna Ukraina, Kyiv, August 5, 1969, p.4." Dmyterko reacts sharply to the publication in the West of Dziuba's monograph Internationalism or Russification and to its enthusiastic reception by the Ukrainian émigré press. Dziuba, says Dmyterko, "decided not merely to expose shortcomings and try to overcome them, but to completely revise the party line, contradict it, discredit it..." Dziuba, says Dmyterko, "has deserted our ranks and fights against us," and that, in his view, is a fact both "contemptible and shameful." See also A235.

A235. Dmyterko, Liubomyr. "Position in battle. About one writer who has found himself on the other side of the barricade."/ Lyubomyr Dmyterko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.9 (September 1969): 21-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 August 1969): 4].

About the furor caused by the publication abroad of Ivan Dziuba's Internationalism or Russification. Dmyterko characterizes Dziuba's works as "renegade writings". Dziuba, in his opinion, "juggles the ideas of Marxist-Leninist classics"; he "decided not merely to expose shortcomings and try to overcome them, but to completely revise the party line, contradict it, discredit [sic]"... "he has become a permanent, active contributor to the foreign enemy press..." "He has deserted our ranks and fights against us". The title supplied by the Digest reads" "Dmyterko condems Dzyuba".

A236. Dmytruk, Vera. "Through common effort." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 January 1970):2].

V. Dmytruk, a representative of the Ukrainian Society of Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries, reports on the society's activities to the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. Of the 130,000 books that were sent by the Society to 92 countries in the past year, more than 50,000 were works of literature, says Dmytruk. According to her report, the Society systematically sends books to the largest libraries of the world, such as UN, UNESCO, and the U.S. Library of Congress, as well as books especially ordered by libraries and individuals. The Digest's title: "V. Dmytruk reports on Society for cultural relations activities on behalf of Ukrainian literature."

A237. "Dnipro". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 327.

Eight lines about the literary monthly journal whose circulation in 1971, according to GSE, was 63,000.

A238. "Dniprova Chaika (pseud. of Liudmila Alekseevna Vasilevskaia, née Berezina)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 327. Biblio.

A 15-line note about Dniprova Chaika (Liudmyla Vasylevs'ka, 1861-1927). According to GSE, "The basic themes of her works are the hard life of the peasantry, the everyday life of the intelligentsiia, and the events of the Revolution of 1905."

A239. "Dniprovskii, I. (pseud. of Ivan Danilovich Shevchenko)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 327. Biblio.

A 12-line note about the writer who wrote under the pen name of Ivan Dniprovs`kyi (1895- 1934). According to GSE, his works "depict events of World War I, the Civil War, and the period of the New Economic Policy."

A240. "Dniprovskiy, I. (pseudonym of: Shevchenko, Ivan)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 132.

Bio-bibliographical data (12 lines) about the poet, writer, playwright Ivan Dniprovs'kyi. Dates of birth and death are given as 24 February 1985, 1 December 1934.

A241. Dobriansky, Lev E. "U.S. zigged, Moscow zagged on Shevchenko. The Shevchenko affair." In his The Vulnerable Russians. New York, Pageant Press [©1967]. 343-358; 359-374.

Chapters XIX and XX in Lev Dobriansky's book on "Soviet Russian imperio-colonialism" discuss the political controversy surrounding the erection of the Taras Shevchenko monument in Washington, D.C. The author reproduces the complete text of the Joint Resolution of the U.S. Congress dated 13 September 1960 authorizing the erection of a Shevchenko statue on public grounds in the District of Columbia [cf. ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840- 1965, A744], provides a survey of opinions expressed on the subject by its supporters and opponents, discusses the publication of the House of Representatives Document No.445 Europe's Freedom Fighter, Taras Shevchenko, 1814-1861 published in 1960 [cf. ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B87], as well as the reaction of the American presss, especially the anti-statue articles published in the Washington Post, and the reactions from the Soviet Union. In Dobriansky's view "... strong propaganda winds were taken out of Moscow's sails when the U.S. Congress passed in 1960 the Shevchenko resolution". The author agrees with the critical statement of the Washington Post, that "the erection of the statue was not merely to satisfy a cultural end." "...the supreme fact about the Shevchenko statue in our Nation's capital is that this permanent monument in honor of Ukraine's poet laureate is a towering political symbol of freedom", says Dobriansky.

A242. Dobczansky, Jurij. "Oles Berdnyk: a bibliographical overview." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 4.1 (Spring 1979): 77-83.

A listing of 26 books, 25 articles, 23 reviews and 8 letters/appeals by Oles' Bednyk published in Ukrainian, Russian and English. Russian and Ukrainian titles are given in transliterated form. According to the bio-bibliographical introduction, Berdnyk was expelled from the Writers' Union of Ukraine in 1973 and was publically criticized "for excessive idealism, mysticism, and messianism..."

A243. "D[octo]r Oles Babiy." Ukrainian Quarterly. 31.2 (Summer 1975): 224.

A 14-line obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events". Oles' Babii, Ukrainian poet, born 17 March 1897 in Ukraine, died in Chicago on 2 March 1975 at the age of 77.

A244. "D[octo]r Watson Kirkconnell." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.2 (Summer 1977): 221.

A 30-line obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the Canadian scholar, translator of Ukrainian poets and author of articles on Ukrainian literature. Born in 1895 in Port Hope, Ontario, he died on 26 February 1977 in Wolfville, Nova Scotia at the age of 81.

A245. "Dol'd-Mikhaylyk, Yuriy (real name Mikhaylyk, Yuriy Petrovich)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 136-137.

Bio-bibliographical data about Iurii Dol'd-Mykhailyk, Ukrainian writer and playwright, b. 17 March 1903, died 17 May 1966.

A246. "Dolengo, Mikhail Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 130.

Thirty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about Mykhailo Dolenho who was a poet and literary critic born 1896.

A247. Dolinsky, Iosif. "Listen to me..." Soviet Film. 4 (143) (1969): 16-17. illus.

Reminiscences about Oleksandr Dovzhenko, the teacher, in a longer article "From the film 'Thirty years long (Some pages of reminiscences)'". The author is a film historian and professor at the USSR Cinema Institute.

A248. Dolny, Eugene A. "The Shevchenko heritage in Ukrainian music." Ukrainian Canadian. 22.511 (5) (March 1969): 26-27. port.

A survey of the most important musical compositions based on Taras Shevchenko's poetry. Says Dolny: "Over 150 composers have created close to 1,000 compositions to Shevchenko's lyrics. They range from single songs to great choral and symphonic canvasses, operas, ballets, touching every musical genre imaginable." The portrait is a drawing of Taras Shevchenko.

A249. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Fear of truth" / Vitaliy Donchyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.5 (May 1976): 12-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna. 10 (October 1975): 162-174].

Donchyk discusses some of the critical writings in the West about the young Ukrainian writers of the 60's, and comes to the following conclusion: "The hopes that the bourgeois nationalists placed in the literary youth of Soviet Ukraine have dispersed like smoke, failing to bring them the results they so badly wanted. Young Soviet Ukrainian writers (some of them passed through a difficult search, sometimes falling into errors which were justly pointed out to them), along with their older colleagues, are successfully creating Soviet Ukrainian literature. This literature is continuing to develop on the principles of the original fundamental principles of socialist realism". I. Koshelivets' [Koszeliwec], Emannuel Rais, G. Luckyj, R. Rakhmanny, C. Manning, J. Pelenski [Ya. Pelenskyy] are accused of "concoctions, distortions, falsifications, the repetition of the same theses." Bohdan Kravtsiv [Krawciw] is named "one of the most arrogant distorters of Soviet Ukrainian literature". The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Western interpreters of Soviet literature accused of distortion".

A250. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Soviet Ukrainian prose." / Vitali Donchik. Tr. by Yuri Sdobnikov. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 147-155.

In his survey of Soviet Ukrainian prose from the 1920's to 1960's Vitalii Donchyk singles out the accomplishments of A. Holovko [Golovko in text], O. Dovzhenko, I. Ianovs'kyi [Yanovsky], O. Honchar [Gonchar], Hryhorii Tiutiunnyk [Grigori Tyutyunnik], M. Stel'makh, I. Vil'de, P. Zahrebel'nyi [Pavel Zagrebelny], I. Smolych [Yuri Smolich] and L. Pervomais'kyi [Pervomaisky]. Among the yonger prose writers he mentions Ie. Hutsalo, V. Drozd, Valerii Shevchuk and Hryhir Tiutiunnyk [Grigor Tyutyunnik], brother of Hryhorii.

A251. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Truth invincible!" / Vitaliy Donchyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.1 (January 1976): 23-25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Dnipro 7 (July 1975): 137-146].

Says Donchyk: "Our enemies would very much like to prove that socialist realism is something 'regimental', a 'list of canons', a 'narrow political doctrine' imposed on art..." These "false 'defenders' of art against politics", according to Donchyk, "expend considerable energy welcoming and supporting every bit of 'discovered' tendenciousness of the anti-Soviet variety, or what can be bluntly called attacks on Soviet reality..." Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists, says Donchyk, "exhibited particular zeal towards the works of the young poets of the sixties, thirstily searching among them for 'opposition' to the Soviet system and 'Moscow's dictate'." Among Western critics who are accused of such practices mentioned by name are I. Koshelivets' [Koszeliwec], B. Kravtsiv [Krawciw], B. Stebel's'kyi [Stebel's'kyy], B. Romanenchuk, J. Pelenski [Yaroslav Pelens'kyy], E. Rais, R. Rakhmanny, A.H. Horbach. The Digest's title: "Western critics accused of searching for attacks on Soviet life in Soviet works".

A252. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Under the mask of objectivity". / Vitaliy Donchuk [sic]. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.3 (March 1975): 25-27. [Excerpts. Russian original in Raduga 9 (September 1974): 158-165].

About the "numerous propaganda centers" and "so-called research institutes" in the West which study the USSR, and whose purpose, in Vitalii Donchyk's words, is "to produce 'scholarly refutations of Marxism-Leninism, to wage slanderous, deceitful campaigns against our philosophy, history, literature and art..." In the field of Ukrainian literature Donchyk mentions by name G. Luckyj, V. Radzykevych, I. Koshelivets' [Koszeliwec], Iu. Lavrynenko [Yu. Lavrinenko], A.H. Horbatsch, E. Rais. The unveiling of the Shevchenko monument in Washington is mentioned, as well as the negative response to a letter of 34 Soviet Ukrainian activits who wished to take part in the official ceremonies. It is of interest to note, that Lavrynenko's "1959 Paris anthology" is identified by the subtitle only "Poema-drama-proza- essay", rather than by its proper title Rozstriliane vidrodzennia (The Executed Renaissance). The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Western and 'Ukrainian nationalist' critics accused of anti-Sovietism."

A253. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Understanding the multiformity of life..." / Vitali Donchik. Tr. by Hilda Perham. Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (1973): 171- 176.

"It is the search for a more rational solution to many 'big' and 'small' questions of today's moral and cultural life that urges us on to find the meaning of the lessons of history, of ethical traditions, of continuity of tradition..." says Donchyk. He discusses recent Ukrainian prose and gives brief characterizations to the works of Honchar, Stel'makh, Mushketyk, Dimarov, Zahrebel'nyi, Hryhir Tiutiunnyk [Grigor Tyutyunnik in text], Hutsalo [Gutsalo in text].

A254. Donchyk, Vitalii. "Understanding the multiformity of life..." / Vitali Donchik. Tr. by Hilda Perham. Ukrainian Canadian. 27.576 (69) (January 1975): 38-41. ports.

About Ukrainian books of the 1960's and 1970's where "one finds a dialectical interpretation of the theme of modernity..." The focus is on Honchar and Zahrebel'nyi, with some discussion of Vasyl Zemliak [Zemlyak] , Anatol Dimarov, Hryhir Tiutiunnyk and Ievhen Hutsalo. Illustrated with portraits of Zahrebel'nyi and Stel'makh.

A255. Doroshenko, Dmytro. A Survey of Ukrainian History. Ed., updated (1914-1975) and with an introd. by Oleh W. Gerus. Winnipeg: Humeniuk Publication Foundation, 1975. xiii, 873 [i.e.880] p. illus.

This one volume general history of Ukraine has no separate chapters on literature or cultural developments. Matters literary are noted very briefly and incidentally on pp. 62-63 [within the subchapter on "Economic conditions in the Kyivan state"], pp.157-158 [subchapter on "Religious polemics"], pp.513-516 [within the subchapter "The beginning of the Ukrainian national renaissance"], pp.522-527 ["The Brotherhood of SS Cyril and Methodius"], pp.551-552 [first pages of the subchapter "The beginning of the national renaissance in Galicia"], p.694 [within the subchapter on "Ukrainization"],and pp.783-788 [within the subchapter "Intellectual and political dissent"].

A256. "Doroshkevych, Aleksandr Konstantinovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 139.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines) about Ukrainian literary critic and historian Oleksandr Doroshkevych. Dates of birth and death are given as 27 September 1889, 1 April 1946.

A257. "Doroshko, Petr Onufrievich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 133.

Petro Doroshko was a poet born 1910. (43-lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A258. "Dosvitnyy, Oles' (real name Skripal, Aleksandr Fyodorovich)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 140.

Fifteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Oles' Dosvitnyi who was born 8 November 1891 and died 9 June 1934 in imprisonment.

A259. Dotsenko, Rostyslav. "Bibliography - an urgent matter." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.10 (October 1976): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 August 1976): 4].

"Thus far in our republic," says Dotsenko, "there is no bibliographic annual that would include an analytical catalogue of all translations of books and periodicals, of works on the theory and practice of translation, and also of research in various literatures." Vsesvit, according to Dotsenko, for several years now publishes once a year a list of translations of foreign authors and critical research published during that year in the Ukrainian SSR. There is a need for bibliographic guides to the literatures of the peoples of the USSR, of the socialist countries and of world literature in Ukrainian translation. The Digest's title: "Lack of bibliographic guides to translated literature deplored".

A260. Dotsenko, Rostyslav. "Shakespeare in Ukrainian" / by Rostislav Dotsenko. Ukrainian Canadian. 28.592 (86) (September 1976): 22-23. ports.

A survey of Ukrainian translations of the works of William Shakespeare. The article is illustrated with b/w portraits of Maksym Ryl's'kyi and Mykola Bazhan.

A261. Dotsenko, Rostyslav. "Translations and the daily press." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.9 (September 1968): 20-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 August 1968): 4].

At one time the daily press in Ukraine showed a lot of interest in literature, including translated foreign literature, but this is no longer so, says Dotsenko. There seems now to be a 'monopoly' on translation, and Dotsenko finds this to be "a strange phenomenon". In the last year, according to Dotsenko, the publishing houses Mystetstvo, Radians'kyi pys'mennyk and Kameniar issued but five translations, while fifty-two books were published by Dnipro, Veselka and Molod. Dotsenko makes a plea to "look more to outlying districts for translators and raise young people for the task" and he complains that "To date, in Ukraine, there is no course given of foreign literature in the Ukrainian language..." Dotsenko ends on an optimistic note saying: "after a hiatus of many years, the tradition of publishing the world classics in Ukrainian is going to be resumed" and he informs the readers of the soon-to-be-published multivolume editions of Jack London and Guy de Mauppassant, as well as the planned new single volume series which is to include such writers as T. Mann, W. Faulkner, E. Hemingway, A.de Saint Exupery, E.T.A. Hoffmann. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Current output of foreign classics termed meager."

A262. "Dovgalyuk, Petr Nikitovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 133.

Petro Dovhaliuk was a literary critic born 1904 (22 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A263. Dovgi, Alexei. "Works by a Ukrainian literary scholar." Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (1973): 206.

A note about Mykhailo Pryhodii [Mikhail Prigodi], a Ukrainian literary scholar who specializes in "studying the links between Russian and Ukrainian literature of the Soviet period."

A263. Dovhaliuk, Petro. "Gzhitskii, Vladimir Zenonovich." / P.N. Dovgaluk. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 508. Biblio.

An 18-line bio-bibliographical note about Volodymyr Gzhyts'kyi (1895-1973). According to the author, Gzhyts'kyi's novel Chorne ozero: "was criticized for inaccurately portraying the nationality problem in the Altai region."

A265. Dovhaliuk, Petro. "A true son of Ukraine" / Petro Dovhalyuk. In Yaroslav Halan. People Without a Homeland: pamphlets. Kiev: Dnipro, 1974. 85 p. port.

Iaroslav Halan's non-literary book is a collection of political polemics directed against Ukrainian nationalists. Dovhaliuk's introduction provides some data about the writer's biography with a brief description of his literary and political works. Dovhaliuk characterizes Halan as "a talented playwright, ardent political writer and unsurpassable pamphleteer."

A266. Dovhaliuk, Petro. "True son of Ukraine." / Petro Dovhalyuk. Ukraine. 3(19) (1974): 18-19.

An abridged reprint of a foreword that appears in Yaroslav Halan's 86 p. book of pamphlets People Without a Homeland, translated into English and issued by Dnipro Publishers in 1974 [cf. A265]. The article is illustrated with a reproduction of the book's title page and Halan's b/w portrait. Iaroslav Halan (1902-1949) was the author of plays, stories, essays and political pamphlets. "Mostly Halan lashed out against the Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists with his bitting [sic] and penetrating satire, exposing their subservience to the Polish rulers, the German imperialists and all those who considered the Ukrainians a tribe fit only for tending sheep and sowing buckwheat, and their language a 'shepherd's cant' which must be eradicated," says Dovhaliuk.

A267. "Dovzhenko, Aleksandr Petrovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 141.

Bio-bibliographical data about Oleksandr Dovzhenko (36 lines), the film director and writer. Dates of birth and death are given as 11 September 1894, 25 November 1956.

A268. "Dovzhenko Film Studio." Ukraine. 1(33) (1978): 26-28. illus.

An article on films produced by the Dovzhenko Studios in Kyiv, many of which are based on the works or lives of Ukrainian literary classics. Among the illustrations: a group photo of Dovzhenko with the actors of one of his films, actor S. Bednarchuk as Shevchenko from the film "Taras Shevchenko", Kotsiubyns'kyi with Lenin (from the film "The Kotsiubynskys") and a full page b/w photo of Dovzhenko's bust at the Kyiv film studio [inside back cover].

A269. Drach, Ivan. "A curse on you, once again. An answer to Mister Kravtsiv & Company." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.9 (September 1966): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 July 1966): 2].

An angry attack on Bohdan Kravtsiv, an exile Ukrainian poet and critic, who is accused of "doctoring up Ukrainian Soviet literature", discovering "deeply planted mines in the foundations of the Soviet system in the shape of individual verses..." Drach compares the interest of the emigré critic in Soviet Ukrainian poetry to green flies flying "from the foreign garbage dump with their customary buzzing" and says: "This politician's masturbation determined his tone in the long article under the title "Protuberances of the heart and the creed of Ivan Drach" printed in the first issue for 1966 of the Munich Suchasnist. Here, a pseudo-objective flattering makeup constitutes a modern visor above the unchanging racist profile of Kravtsiv..." Drach disputes Kravtsiv's contention that his cycle of poems "My Shevchenkiana" was prevented from being published in full in Ukraine, but even if it were so, asks Drach: "... is this any business of the likes of Mister Kravtsiv?"

A270. Drach, Ivan. "The great guide." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.2 (February 1976): 24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 December 1975): 1].

The Digest's title reads: "Drach eulogizes CC CPSU Draft for 25th Party Congress." Says Drach about the Communist Party draft: "This profoundly argued and thoroughly thought out document gives the Soviet people unalterable confidence and fills their hearts with the conviction of the rightfulness of all their future plans; it envigorates and captivates." ... "The draft of the CC CPSU channels our aspirations and actions along a clear path. The party awaits works from us which are worthy of our unique times."

A271. Drach, Ivan. "Our grey-haired interpretor [sic]." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 November 1968): 3].

A tribute to Hryhorii Kochur, a poet-translator of Shakespeare, Paul Verlaine, Julian Tuwim, Greek and Hebrew works, Czech and Slovak poets, et al. Drach calls Kochur "an extraordinary man", "a poet, a translator and a scholar, a witty conversationalist, my grey-haired teacher and older friend." Kochur is characterized as "the soul of the Union of Writers of Ukraine translating section", and as a 'modest, boundlessly energetic man." Drach speaks with regret about "the non- existent chair of translation in our capital's university which Kochur does not occupy." Digest's title: "Drach hails Kochur on 60th anniversary."

A272. Drach, Ivan. "Spoleto, poetry, 1967." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.11 (November 1967): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (3 October 1967): 3].

Ivan Drach, a participant in the international poetry festival which took place in Spoleto, Italy in July 1967, writes about his fellow participants Allen Ginsburg (USA), Octavio Paz (Mexico), Ingeborg Bachman (Austria), as well as about his meetings with Ihor Kostets'kyi, Elizabeth Kottmeier and Jerzy Hordynski, who were present at his poetry reading. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Drach shares stage with Ginsberg [sic]."

A273. "Drach, Ivan Fedorovich". Prominent Personalities of the USSR. (1968). 134.

Seventeen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet Ivan Drach.

A274. "Drach, Ivan Fedorovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 397.

An unsigned note (11 lines + biblio.) about the poet Ivan Drach (b. 1936). Drach, according to this entry, "...showed himself to be an innovator. His poetry is characterized by colorful and original imagery and thematic diversity."

A275. "Dragomanov, Mikhail Petrovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 398-399.

An unsigned 54-line long encyclopedia article about Mykhailo Drahomanov (1841-1895). "As a literary critic Dragomanov struggled for the affirmation of realism and the national principle in Ukrainian literature and for the unity of Ukrainian and Russian literature", says this entry.

A276. "Dray-Khmara, Mikhail Afanas'yevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 142.

Eleven lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet, translator and literary historian Mykhailo Drai-Khmara. Dates of birth and death are given as 10 October 1889, 19 January 1939.

A277. "Drofan, Anatoliy Pavlovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 134-135.

Anatolii Drofan' was a prose writer born in 1919. (18 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A278. Drozd, Volodymyr. [Untitled]. / Vladimir Drozd. Soviet Literature. 3 (336) (1976): 90-91.

An untitled introductory article to accompany a translation of Iurii Shcherbak's "oratorio" The little soccer team published in the same issue. [cf. T344]. Says Drozd about Shcherbak's work: "The story, though small in size, has an intricate composition and its main feature is its central highly humanistic idea of the ultimate victory of life over death."

A279. Dubkov, Serhiy. "Before the court of history". / Serhiy Dubkov, Anatoliy Kovtunenko, Fedir Pohrebennyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.9 September 1970): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 August 1970): 3].

The Digest's title: "Recommend selective approach to Vynnychenko's works". The three authors are scholars associated with the Shevchenko Institute of Literature of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Sciences in Kyiv. Volodymyr Vynnychenko, according to this article, is beginning to attract attention in the émigre press on the occasion of the 90th anniversary of his birth. The authors focus on the introductory article to the selected works of Vynnychenko published in Bratislava. They object especially to the "tendency to elaborate and exaggerate the role of Vynnychenko in the literary process at the beginning of the 20th century, and attempts to examine his literary heritage separately from his world outlook and his anti-people political activity..." Say the authors: "We cannot deny that in his early realistic novels, as well certain works of the later period [sic], Vynnychenko made a definite contribution to the development of Ukrainian literature, and it is this part of his heritage which deserves attention and acceptance."

A280. Dubyna, Mykola. "Facing life. Over the pages of Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.12 (December 1974): 11-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 October 1974): 2-3].

A survey of recent articles in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo, with a focus on those attempting to point out the shortcomings, inadequate "partymindedness" and ideological faults in literary criticism, i.e. the articles by D. Zatonskyi, O. Babyshkin, M. Ostryk, L. Sanov, M. Shamota and S. Kryzhanivs'kyi. "Criticism often steers clear of complex, controversial phenomena in the modern litarary process", says Dubyna, critics "forget that the artistic form has never been and can never be ideologically neutral, divorced from the artist's civic stance..." As a consequence, according to Dubyna, "ideologically controversial figures are whitewashed and thus pronounced sound, the real is confused with the imaginary, and mediocre writers are sometimes projected into undeserved, 'leading positions'." This, says Dubyna, happened in the case of H. Kosynka, B.I. Antonych, P. Kulish, A. Zalyvchyi (Zalyvchyy), M. Kulish, A. Mykhailychenko (Mykhaylychenko), S. Zarudnyi (Zarudnyy)... Among "the mistakes" caught by these official critics Dubyna mentions the fact that M. Rudenko's collection of poems Vsesvit u tobi was not adequately criticized for "the author's erroneous views and ideologically harmful tendencies". The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Critic demands strict adherence to principles of socialist realism."

A281. Dubyna, Mykola. "Shevchenko's Kobzar exposes." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.10 (October 1973): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 August 1973): 3].

In discussing Western publications of Taras Shevchenko's works, namely the four-volume edition of Kobzar, edited by Leonid Bilets'kyi and published in Winnipeg in 1952-1954 and the 13 volume edition of Shevchenko's works, edited by B. Kravtsiv and published by Denysiuk, Dubyna accuses the emigré editors of biases and falsifications. The Digest's title: "Emigre publisher accused of falsifying Shevchenko's works."

A282. Dukhovnyy, Tymofiy. "Bibliographic matters." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.10 (October 1971): 4-7. [Excerpts. Original in Literaturna Ukraina. (10 September 1971): 2].

"... we are not very well informed about what has and what has not been translated into our native language. The chief reason for this lack of knowledge is that the state of our bibliography is not as it should be," says the author. He provides a series of examples where the lack of bibliographical information led to false or misleading statements, calls for a republication with supplements of Iu. Mezhenko's and M. Iashchenko's work Chuzhomovne pys'menstvo v ukrains'kykh perekladakh (1929), etc. The Digest's title reads: "Calls for a republican bibliographic center".

A283. Dukhovnyy, Tymofiy. "Master of literary translation." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.5 (May 1973): 17-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kultura i zhyttia ( 11 March 1973): 2].

An article about Borys Ten (i.e. Mykola Vasyl'ovych Khomychevs'kyi) on the occasion of his 75th birthday. The author characterizes Borys Ten as "... a man of surprisingly great erudition, an expert in world literature, a musicologist, a subtle critic of the choral art..." According to this article, Borys Ten translated from ancient Greek and Latin, from English, French, Italian, German, Polish, Slovak, Czech, Russian and Belorussian and has done, among other things, "talented interpretations" of Shakespeare, Goethe, Schiller, Mickiewicz, S owacki, Verlaine, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristotle, Plato, Horace. His greatest accomplishment, according to Dukhovnyy, is his Ukrainian translation of Homer's Odyssey and he has completed also a translation of the Iliad which is about to be published. The Digest's title: "Borys Ten - a master of translation".

A284. "Duma". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 444-445. Biblio.

Defined here as "an epic-lyrical genre of Ukrainian vocal musical folklore", characterized "by an absence of division into stanzas, free rhythm, improvised development and harmonic originality." (42 lines + biblio).

A285. "Dumka". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 447.

"Dumka", among other meanings, is used as "the common name for Ukrainian and Polish lyrical and lyrical-epic songs resembling the duma in their improvised quality and harmonic properties", says GSE. (5 lines).

A286. Dumka, M. "From Greek and Latin". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.5 (May 1969): 21-22. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (28 March 1969): 4].

Dumka discusses briefly the recently published translations of Latin poets by M. Zerov, Borys Ten's translation of Homer's Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid translated by M. Bilyk and two translations of Aristotle's Poetics. At the same time he calls attention to older translations from Greek and Latin done by such scholars as Ilarion Ohonovskyi (Ohonovskyy) and Omelian Horotskyi (Omelyan Horotskyy) with a plea for their republication. The Digest's title: "Urges more translations from the classics".

A287. Dumka, M. "A word about "Slovo'." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.5 (May 1969): 22. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (29 March 1969): 6].

Slovo o polku Ihorevim - in its entirety or in fragments - has been translated into Ukrainian by such poets as M. Shashkevych, I. Franko, T. Shevchenko, Vasyl' Mova-Lymans'kyi, P. Myrnyi, B. Hrinchenko, V. Svidzynskyi, N. Zabila, P. Tychyna, L. Novychenko and above all, M. Ryl's'kyi, says the author. In his opinion, not just a selection, but all translations and adaptations of Slovo should be published. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Calls for publication of all translations of 'Ihor's Campaign'."

A288. Dunayevs'kyy, V. "Publishing news from Naukova dumka." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 February 1970): 1].

Among the recent publications of Naukova dumka publishing house, according to this report, are an eight volume history of Ukrainian literature and a seven-volume edition of collected works of Panas Myrnyi; a two-volume edition of Drahomanov's literary publicistic works is about to be published. The Digest's title: "Naukova dumka reports on latest publications".

A289. Duravetz, George Nicholas. "Maxim Gorki and Mykhaylo Kotsiubynskyi: personal contacts and literary relationship." Ukrainian Review (London). 19.3 (Autumn 1972): inside back cover.

An unsigned, apparently the author's own, abstract of his MA thesis presented at the University of Manitoba in 1970. The thesis, based on personal correspondence between the two writers and their works, attempts to prove that despite their friendship, "their mutual influences did not extend to their literary works as contemporary Soviet literary critics maintain."

A290. Dushnyck, Walter. "Arthur Coleman, Slavist and friend of Ukrainians." Ukrainian Quarterly. 30.3 (Autumn 1974): 284-286.

An obituary article about Arthur Prudden Coleman, author of articles on Ukrainian literature and a pioneer translator of Ukrainian poetry, who died on 14 July 1974 in Meridan, Connecticut, at the age of 76.

A291. Dushnyck, Walter. "Kaye-Kisilewsky - an unusual Ukrainian Canadian scholar." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.4 (Winter 1978): 400-402.

An obituary of Vladimir Julian Kysilewsky, better known as V.J. Kaye. Born on 26 August 1896 in Kolomyia, he died on 30 August 1976 in Ottawa at the age of 80. A journalist and Slavic scholar, he was also, according to this obituary, an author of an unpublished collection of short stories in Ukrainian.

A292. Dushnyck, Walter. "Valentyn Moroz." Ukrainian Quarterly. 30.2 (Summer 1974): 198-200.

Remarks of Walter Dushnyck while accepting the World Anti-Communist League Freedom Fighter Award on behalf of Valentyn Moroz on April 10, 1974 in Washington, D.C.

A293. "Dyachenko, Aleksandr Sergeevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 140.

Literary critic and translator Oleksandr Diachenko was born in 1919 (24 lines of bio- bibliographical data).

A294. Dychenko, Ivan. "Ivan Trush writes to the Kamenyar /Stonemason/." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.10 (October 1976): 17-18. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 September 1976): 4].

According to Dychenko, the archives at the manuscript division of the Shevchenko Institute of Literature in Kyiv contain some fifty letters by Ivan Trush, several of which are addressed to Ivan Franko. The author provides some descriptions of these postcards and letters sent between 1896 and 1912. In Dychenko's opinion, the sittings for the portrait that Trush painted of Ivan Franko must have taken place between 14 August and 12 September 1908. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Painter's correspondence with Franko recalled on writer's anniversary."

A295. Dyky, Luba M. "Mykola Kuliš's Sonata Pathetique."/ Luba Dyky. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 5-7. biblio.

Summary of the paper read on 12 October 1972 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, a Ph.D. candidate in Slavic literatures at Harvard University, spoke about Patetychna sonata, which she characterized as the most important dramatic work of Mykola Kulish and as one of the most important works in Ukrainian literature. Patetychna sonata, according to the speaker, as reported here, is "a symbolic presentation and evaluation of the forces of the revolution in Ukraine", "structured after the pattern of the vertep folk puppet theater" and "very rich in symbolism and the poetic structure of its language".

A296. Dyky, Luba M. "Some aspects of the Sonata Pathetique by Mykola Kulish." Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 11.1-2 (31-32) (1964-1968): 109-128; 12.1-2 (33-34) (1969-1972): 158-191.

This paper - published in two parts - is the text of the author's Master's thesis presented at Harvard University. According to Dyky, the premiere of Patetychna sonata took place at the Kamernyi theater in Moscow on 19 December 1931. Alisa Koonen was playing the leading role of Maryna. The play was warmly received by the first Moscow critics and for two months almost every performance was sold out. However, on 4 March 1932 Pravda published a review by an unknown author signed "Ukrainets". The author, says Dyky, not only attacked the drama "in the most bitter terms as a fascist and nationalistic work, but also, in an exceedingly angry tone, scolded all those who had voiced favorable opinions of the play..." Soon thereafter the play was forbidden to be performed. An authorized copy of the play given by the author to the German playwright Friedrich Wolf found its way to Berlin and then to the Library of Congress. The original Ukrainian text was first published in Lviv in 1943. According to Dyky, "The drama Sonata Pathetique (Patetychna Sonata) is probably the greatest and most accomplished work of the Ukrainian playwright Mykola Kulish and one of the most important works of Ukrainian dramatic literature in general." The paper provides a detailed analysis of the play. "The structure of the Sonata Pathetique can be traced to the tradition of the Ukrainian vertep theatre in which various actions go on simultaneously on different parts of the stage", says Dyky. "Following the pattern of the vertep, Kulish so set the action of the Sonata Pathetique that it takes place on two different levels (two floors with a balcony and a basement) of the same building from which the front wall on each floor has been removed to allow the audience to see what is going on." Dyky claims that Kulish uses Beethoven's music "not only to orchestrate the play in its various actions and moods, but to integrate the different movements of Beethoven's Sonata into the changing actions and moods of his own work. Throughout the drama the various movements of Beethoven's Sonata appear as symbols of various movements and actions within the play and at the same time serve as integral components of the dramatic action within the play". In addition to music, in Dyky's view, "Kulish's system of symbols includes the characters themselves, various objects, both the ones physically present on stage as well as those the audience is asked to imagine, and especially, the language which overflows with symbolic meaning". According to Luba Dyky, "The very choice of Beethoven's Sonata, the Pathetique, is symbolic of the Ukrainian Revolution. It was a thing full of pathos, of surging and ebbing passion and power, which brought great hope and beauty, but at the same time pain and sadness to its people. Kulish experimented with new forms of the drama and managed to synthesize music and revolution in the form of the drama." Excerpts from the play (in English translation) are used as illustrations.

A297. Dzeverin, Ihor. "Above all - scholarship and priciplemindedness; notes on literary criticism." / I. Dzeverin. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.4 (April 1973): 12-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (18 February 1973): 2,4].

A survey of critical articles published during 1972. While a number of these articles are described as "professionally mature critical articles on contemporary themes" that present "thoughtful analyses" (e.g. by V. Fashchenko, V. Donchyk, L. Fedorovs'ka, A. Fed, M. Zhulyns'kyi, V. Mel'nyk), several are singled out for criticism (e.g. V. Fedynyshynets's "Poeziia: slova i slovo v poezii", Dnipro, no.8; M. Levchenko's "Tradytsii revolutsiinoi prystrasti", Literaturna Ukraina, 10 November; M. Ravliuk's "Neporushni zasady", Vechirnii Kyiv, 27-28 January). The Digest's title: "Literary criticism in 1972 reviewed".

A298. Dzeverin, Ihor. "Literary criticism and its influence". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 9-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (27 April 1971): 4].

The Digest's title: "Stress literature as form of ideology." "... the combination of esthetic analysis with sociological analysis is not merely the criterion of the quality of criticism, but the necessary condition of its effectiveness," says Dzeverin. "By limiting its task to a discussion of artistic means and methods... criticism looses the ability to make objective and demonstrable judgements on the literary phenomena and therefore ceases being scientific." Dzeverin provides examples of critical reviews which, in his opinion, do not meet the criteria of authoritative criticism according to Marxist-Leninist methodology.

A299. Dzeverin, Ihor. "National education in Ukrainian SSR: Real facts and nationalistic fabrications." / O.[sic] Dzeverin, O. Savchenko, V. Smal'. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.3 (March 1969): 10-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka shkola. 11 (November 1968): 99-106].

A polemical review-article of John Kolasky's Education in Soviet Ukraine. [cf. B044]. Activities of John Kolasky in collecting the data for his book in Ukraine are, according to the authors, "redolent of espionage". Kolasky is accused of "anti-Soviet scribblings", "misrepresentation of reality", "hostile, anti-Soviet positions", "malicious fabrication", "propagandist diatribe". Kolasky, according to Dzeverin and Co. "ventures so far as to compare Soviet government to tsarist autocracy, he stoops to inventions about 'contemporary Russian colonialism' and goes on about some sort of 'theory of universal rule of the Russian language..." The authors make an attempt to provide some data to refute Kolasky's statements about educational institutions, forceful Russification, textbooks used in schools, the number of students in higher learning, discrimination against Ukrainian students, etc. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Kolasky's book on education in Ukraine assailed."

A300. Dzeverin, Ihor. "Socialist realism: history and theory." / I. Dzeverin. Soviet Studies in Literature. 9.3 (Summer 1973): 3-11.

A review article - translated from the journal Znamia, no.5, 1972 - of R. Ivanov's book Ideino-esteticheskie printsipy sovetskoi literatury (Formorovanie i sushnost' [The Ideological-Esthetic Principles of Soviet Literature, Their Formation and Essence]. Dzeverin characterizes this book as "a meaningful piece of research, marked by a high level of theory and ideas, that is a significant contribution to Soviet literary research and the theory of socialist realism."

A301. Dziuba, Ivan. "Babyi Yar address by I. Dzyuba." In Quest of Justice: Protest and Dissent in the Soviet Union Today. Ed. by Abraham Brumberg. New York: Praeger [©1970]. 200-204.

The date of Dziuba's speech at Babyn Iar is given as 29 September 1966. "Babyi Yar is a tragedy of all mankind, but it happened on Ukrainian soil," says Dziuba. "And, therefore, a Ukrainian has no more right to forget it than a Jew has. Babyi Yar is our common tragedy, a tragedy for both the Jewish and the Ukrainian nation..." "Anti-Semitism is an international phenomenon. It has existed and still exists in all societies..." (continues Dziuba)..."what is strange is the fact that no struggle has been waged here against it during the postwar decades; what is more, it has often been artificially nourished. It seems that Lenin's instructions concerning the struggle against anti-Semitism are forgotten in the same way as his precepts regarding national development of the Ukraine."... "We Ukrainians must fight against all manifestations in our midst of anti-Semitism or disrespect toward the Jews... You Jews must fight against those in your midst who do not respect the Ukrainian people, the Ukrainian culture, the Ukrainian language - against those who unjustly see a potential anti-Semite in every Ukrainian." An 11-line biographical note about Dziuba appears on p.465-466.

A302. Dziuba, Ivan. "Babyn Yar continues." ABN Correspondence. 19.1 (January-February 1968): 10-11.

Text of Ivan Dziuba's speech which was delivered, according to a note on p.3, "at the commemoration ceremonies in memory of the Jews murdered by Nazis at Babyn Yar". No date of the commemoration is provided. Dziuba speaks of Babyn Iar as a mutual tragedy of both Ukrainians and Jews. Even though this tragedy was brought about by Fascism, says Dziuba, we must remember "that Fascism did not start with Babyn Yar and does not end with it. Fascism begins with disrespect of the individual; and ends with the destruction of the individual, with the destruction of peoples..." Dziuba calls upon Ukrainians to "struggle against all manifestations of anti-Semitism or disrespect for Jews, all misunderstanding of the Jewish problem" and upon Jews "to combat those who do not respect a Ukrainian, Ukrainian culture, or the Ukrainian language, who unjustly see a potential anti-Semite in every Ukrainian." In his speech Dziuba spoke also of Jewish writers who lived and worked on Ukrainian soil and of Ukrainian writers who spoke out against anti-Semitism or wrote on Jewish themes.

A303. Dziuba, Ivan. "The cleansing and life-giving fire: The motives of 'national shame' and national 'self-criticism' in Shevchenko's poetry." Ukrainian Review (London). 14.2 (Summer 1967): 24-32.

"National shame", according to Dziuba is an expression of Karl Marx. Shevchenko, says Dziuba, "consciously inflamed the national shame: with it, as with national pride, national memories, he wanted to regenerate the entire nation, to change its historical fate." Dziuba quotes Shevchenko's poetry from "Poslaniie", "Kholodnyi iar", "Iurodyvyi" and other works to illustrate and prove his point. The excerpts of poetry appear in Vera Rich's translation.

A304. Dziuba, Ivan. "The corypheus of literary scholarship. Sketches for a portrait." / Ivan Dzyuba. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.8 (August 1975): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Dnipro 3 (March 1975): 142- 149].

The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Dzyuba on Oleksandr Bilets'kyy." Says Dziuba about Oleksandr Bilets'kyi: "His scientific thoroughness and investigative scrupulousness have earned him an authoritative position among literary scholars specializing in many periods and peoples..." Bilets'kyi was engaged in "assidous and impressively resultful work" for more than half a century, says Dziuba, he was "much too selfless to concern himself with the fate of his writings", and, as a consequence, some of his scholarly heritage still needs to be properly collected and republished.

A305. Dziuba, Ivan. "He lit up of himself." / Ivan Dzyuba. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 October 1968): 3-4].

About the poet Volodymyr Svidzins'kyi [Svidzyns'kyy in text] whose 1940 volume Poezii was, in Dziuba's view, "an unprecedented phenomenon for the time". For the poet "the honorable (and, if we think about it, courageous) winning of his right to 'silence' and 'solitude' is a quiet and gentle insistence which did not denote a 'retreat from life' but rather a retreat into life...", says Dziuba. The contemporary poet and poetry reader, according to Dziuba, can learn from Svidzinskyi "respect for the word, stylistic nuances, the enchantement of poetic magic, the search for treasure-troves of folk-poetry; but most of all he can learn to be himself." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Ivan Dzyuba appears in Literaturna Ukraina." There is also a brief editorial note.

A306. Dziuba, Ivan. "Internationalism or Russification." ABN Correspondence. 19.4 (July-August 1968): 17-23; 19.5 (September-October 1968): 19-30.

Chapter 7 of a work by Ukrainian literary critic Ivan Dziuba circulating in manuscript form in the Soviet Union. The work deals with "the national question", how it was posed in Lenin's theoretical work and how the theory has been replaced by Russian chauvinism in Soviet Ukraine's present reality.

A307. Dziuba, Ivan. "Ivan Dziuba on Hryhory Skovoroda." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 67-70.

Translation of Dziuba's article which was published in Ukrainian in Literaturna Ukraina of 4 December 1962, with an editorial note about the author. Dziuba appeals to scholars, writers and teachers to rediscover the ideas of Hryhorii Skovoroda. It was to Skovoroda, says Dziuba, "that the best sons of the Ukrainian nation used to turn in times of suffering and of decision, at critical moments in history." The young people of today, according to Dziuba, would find in Skovoroda "nourishment of mind and conscience" and a guide "among the complex problems of the present and in its moral atmosphere." The scholars, on the other hand, should find it very interesting and productive to study Skovoroda in a comparative context studying the almost analogous views and synchronous ideas in the ideology of the early English puritanism (John Bunyan) or American transcendentalisn (Ralph Emerson, Henry Thoreau) or comparing anthropological elements in Skovoroda and Feuerbach. Rather than make analogies based on superficial traits, as was done with Skovoroda and Tolstoy, it would be better, says Dziuba, to study the "deeper inner relationship" between Skovoroda and Dostoyevsky, "particularly with regard to the concept of God and the passionate search after religious truth", and especially the great affinity of ideas between Skovoroda and Shevchenko, both of whom share "the truly Ukrainian conception of truth and conscience as immutable human principles."

A308. Dziuba, Ivan. "The poetry of Mykola Vinhranovskyi." / Ivan Dzyuba. Ukrainian Review (London). 16.4 (Winter 1969): 15-32.

There is a brief footnote on Dziuba, but no indication of the original source of this article dated 10 March 1968 and obviously translated from Ukrainian.

Dziuba discusses Vinhranovs'kyi's poetry on the basis of the poet's latest collection Sto poezii (Kyiv: Molod', 1967. 125 p.) Vinhranovs'kyi, says Dziuba, "is a rare, strange spiritual datum, self-sufficiency, harmony - an [sic] finiteness in himself, but without limitations from the outside; concentricity growing into space." The basic principle of Vinhranovs'kyi's "unique poetic individuality", according to Dziuba, is that it "lacks any kind of predetermination"... "All of Vinhranovs'kyi's poetry is a liquid variability, metamorphosis. There is nothing forced, nothing evident in advance, no prejudice"... it is like "a constant mutual transfusion of various feelings and various states of mind, its various 'levels'. As though inspiration together [sic] burns through sluices in a complicated system of reservoirs of different levels, and diverse elements are streaming in incomprehensible directions, until a beautiful and free equilibrium is achieved, in which everything becomes broader, clearer and finds itself anew." Ukraine, the people, the nation are for Vinhranovs'kyi in Dziuba's view "the vibrating centre around which the whole subject matter of spiritual life develops, and to which everything returns one way or another", it is "not a theme, not a motif, not a picture to which one turns occasionally or often" but "a living pain, encompassing the whole being." Says Dziuba: "Mykola Vinhranovs'kyi's experience shows in particular that a contemporary poet, being modern in everything and availing himself of all dramas, contradictions and dizzy disharmonies of the present world, absorbing all its senseless voices, can at the same time himself attempt to achieve artistic equilibrium and harmony, reach a conclusion and synthesis, the classical 'well-roundedness', the wholeness of the spiritual process. Mykola Vinhranovs'kyi, with all his impetuosity and passion, with all the ungovernability of fantasy, with all the 'nervousness' of poetic intonations and the feverishness of poetic pace, with acute reproduction of the antagonisms of the age, with all the bustle and curses, which go with it, is brilliantly and nobly balanced in spite of all that." Some lines of Vinhranovs'kyi's poetry are quoted in unattributed literal translations. The longer fragments are: "This small ravine where the girl and the cloud" (10 lines, pp.18-19); "The splashing of the water from among the rushes" (24 lines, pp.20-21); "All can be forgiven now. I'm afraid" (12 lines, p.23); "And the nation waded. In places where one could cross and where one could not" (6 lines, p.25).

A309. Dziuba, Ivan. "A road taken forever." / Ivan Dzyuba. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.8 (August 1975): 25-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Visti z Ukrainy. 21 (874) (May 1975): 4].

The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Dzyuba reaffirms his 'complete return' to Soviet society." Dziuba finds it necessary to respond to what he calls "gossip innuendos" spread about him in the West. Says Dziuba: "... it gives me little pleasure to recall the tragedy I lived through. But I am forced to do so - one more time. What did it consist of, what led to my arrest, brought me to the preliminary investigation cell, and finally to the criminal dock? All this had a prehistory, which lasted several years during which I held deeply erroneous views on the nationalities question and committed wrongful antisocial acts." "... Internationalism or Russification, which I wrote in 1965... constituted an attack on the Communist Party's nationalities policy. Enemies abroad... exploited it in their propaganda... in April 1973 I was arrested and charged with conducting anti-Soviet propaganda and agitation... I was faced with a dilemma: either to adhere obstinately to what had long since become part of my past, or to settle final accounts with it... I chose this second path. The path of overcoming my mistakes, of ending several years of deviation into civic and creative emptiness; the path to complete and irreversible reckoning with the inertia of erroneous and harmful views; the path of affirming those Socialist, Soviet-patriotic ideological and creative attitudes which for me are organically linked with all my early public and literary activities. Hence, I regard this road not only as a complete return to Soviet society, but also as my return to my own self."

A310. Dziuba, Ivan. "To the Editorial office of Literaturna Ukraina: a statement."/ Ivan Dzyuba. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.12 (December 1973); 22-24. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (9 November 1973): 4].

A brief editorial statement from Literaturna Ukraina says among other things: "Taking into consideration the fact that he had pleaded guilty during the investigation of the crime, had facilitated the investigation of the crine, and had genuinely repented, the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Ukrainian SSR pardoned I.M. Dzyuba." In his statement, Dziuba speaks of his arrest in April 1972 "on the charge of conducting anti-Soviet propaganda and agitation", of his sentence in March of 1973 by the Kyiv Oblast Court to five years of deprivation of freedom. His work Internationalism or Russification written in 1965, says Dziuba: "contained a deeply erroneous understanding of a number of problems concerning the national question and the internationalist nature of our socialist society, a distortion of their interpretation, and, in fact, opposition to the nationalities policy of the party." He regrets the fact that his book "was used in the ideological struggle against our Soviet land. I realized that I had harmed the ideological interests of my society." Dziuba claims that he is working on a revised version of his book "to disclose the insolvency and fallibility of a number of fundamental theses put forward in that earlier work... and to express my principled stand against the ideology of Ukrainian bourgeois nationalism." The Digest's title: "Dzyuba repudiates former views".

A311. Dziuba, Ivan. "Vasyl Symonenko. A speech commemorating the 30th birthday of the Poet, delivered on January 10th, 1965, at the Republican Building of Literature in Kyïv." Ukrainian Review (London). 14.1 (Spring 1967): 43-49.

"Vasyl Symonenko started from shallow maxims but arrived at philosophical, political thought, at the creation of ideas, at poetry as an arena for independent thinking," says Dziuba. Symonenko, in Dziuba's view, is "most of all a poet of national idea", but he "felt a strong bond of the national idea with all the values common to mankind, with the concepts of human dignity, honesty and conscience; with the concept of personal and social ethics and justice." Symonenko, according to Dziuba, gave his contemporaries a "moral lesson of civic ethics". "Personal adherence to principle, uncompromising stand and calm courage were joined in him with high and binding social consciousness..." Dziuba is bothered by the sudden hypocrytical "love" for Symonenko expressed by some editors and critics. Symonenko was "a poet of a definite idea, and he who declares his love for him thereby takes upon himself definite obligations", says Dziuba. Preceding the text of Dziuba's speech is an unsigned article entitled "An act of civic courage: Editorial comments on I. Dziuba's speech on the poet, V. Symonenko." (pp.39-42), which provides bio-bibliographical data on both Symonenko and Dziuba, as well as some explanatory references. Eight lines of Symonenko's poem "My nation exists, my nation will always exist!" are quoted in an unattributed translation on p.48.

A312. Dzyra, Iaroslav. "The discoverer of Ukrainian antiquity. Founder of the Kiev Philological School." / Ya. I. Dzyra. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.4 (April 1970): 10-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Ukrains'kyi istorychnyi zhurnal. 1 (January 1970): 135-137.

An article about Volodymyr Mykolaiovych Perets on the occasion of the centennial of his birth on 31 January 1970. "Perets was the discoverer and the honest, conscientious and unprejudiced researcher who trained a whole school of specialists in the Ukrainian antiquity", says Dzyra. The author claims that "The history of ancient Ukrainian literature holds a central position in the scholar's long list of publications - 318 published works." The Digest's title: "Eminent Ukrainian scholar honored by UNESCO".

A312a. Dzyra, Iaroslav. "Oldest recorded Ukrainian folk song. Composed 500 years ago and recorded 400 years ago." / Yaroslav Dzyra. Forum. 19 (1972): 21. illus.

"... the first Ukrainian song, which is also one of the earliest known records of a folk song in the whole Slavic world, was recorded exactly four hundred years ago. This is the versified text of the song, "O Danube, O Danube, why do you flow so sad?" included in Jan Blahoslav's 16th century Czech Grammar", says Dzyra. The article was originally published in Ukrainian in Literaturna Ukraina (31 December 1971): 2.

A313. "EFC defends arrested writers." ABN Correspondence. 23.2 (March-April 1972): 2.

A statement from the Executive Board of the European Freedom Council dated March 11-12, 1972 which brings to the attention of the general public the plight of Ukrainian writers V. Moroz, I. Svitlychnyi, V. Chornovil and Ie. Sverstiuk, "condemns Russian terrorism" and calls on other organizations to press for the release of all political prisoners in the USSR.

A314. Eayrs, James. "Moroz: Soviet political captive no.1." ABN Correspondence. 25.5 (September-October 1974): 7-10.

A news report about Valentyn Moroz reprinted from an unspecified issue of the Toronto Star. [See also A315].

A315. Eayrs, James. "Moroz - Soviet political captive no.1." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.4 (Winter 1974): 51-54.

Reprint of an article about Valentyn Moroz and his treatment in Soviet prison which appeared originally in The Gazette (Montreal) on Wednesday, 7 August 1974 and in the Toronto Star on Thursday, 8 August 1974.

A316. "Editorial note." In Mykola Zerov: Lektsii z istorii ukrains'koi literatury (1798-1870). Ed. by Doreen W. Gorsline and Oksana Solovey. [Oakville, Ont.]: Published for the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies by Mosaic Press, 1977. 5-6.

An unsigned note which serves as an English introduction to a collection of university lectures on the history of Ukrainian literature by Mykola Zerov. The lectures date from the 1920's and are published in the original Ukrainian. Mykola Zerov (born 1890) is characterized by the editors as "the leading literary historian in Ukraine during the 1920's", "a critic and an outstanding poet and translator", who, as a scholar, "was the first to view the literary-historical process in Ukraine in its total organic development" and whose vision was based "on a sensitive perception of the interaction between literary and cultural-historical structures."

A317. "The elevated calling of writers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 11-12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 June 1970): 1].

Seventy young writers came to Kyiv to participate in a three-day conference called by the CC Komsomol of Ukraine and the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. Speeches were delivered by CC Komsomol secretary Tamara V. Hlavak, as well as by writers Oles' Honchar, L. Novychenko, S. Kryzhanivs'kyi [Kryzhanivs'kyy] and K. Volyns'kyi [Volyns'kyy]. Excerpts from Honchar's speech "We welcome you, youth" appear in the Digest on p.12 (original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 June 1970): 1). The Digest's title: "Conference of young prose writers held in Kiev."

A318. "Encyclopaedia Britannica will add biographies of Shevchenko and Hrushevsky - some day." Forum. 1.2 (Spring 1967): 21.

Unsigned note about some efforts to persuade Encyclopaedia Britannica to improve its coverage of Ukrainian subjects.

A319. "Enlightener, philosopher and poet. A festive evening held in Kiev to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of H. S. Skovoroda." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (3 December 1972): 3].

The commemorative evening was held on the 1st of December in Kyiv at the Shevchenko State Academic Opera house. Speeches were delivered by V.I. Shynkaruk, director of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Sciences Institute of Philosophy, F.V. Konstantynov, chairman of the All-Union Jubilee Committee, V. O. Tyurin, UNESCO representative, and V.P. Kozachenko, deputy chairman of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. The Digest's title: "Celebrate Skovoroda anniversary in Kiev, Moscow". [For Moscow celebrations see A713].

A320. "Evarnitskiy (Yavornitskiy) Dmitriy Ivanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 158.

Bio-bibliographical data (25 lines) about Dmytro Iavornyts'kyi, Ukrainian archeologist, ethnographer, historian and writer. Dates of birth and death are given as 25 October 1855, 5 August 1940.

A321. "Everyday life in a Mordovian camp" / B. Penson, V. Chornovil. Ukrainian Review (London). 22 [i.e.23].2 (Summer 1976): 24-61.

An attempt to describe daily camp life, to reproduce, as the authors put it, "the specific microclimate of prison which strangles the prisoner every day, every hour, even during relatively peaceful periods..." The authors of these impressions, in addition to Penson and Chornovil, include Ukrainian writers Vasyl Stus who writes about the conditions in a camp hospital (pp.37- 40) and S.Karavans'kyi who testifies about the prison conditions of his wife Nina Strokata.

A322. Ewach, Honore. "The Ukraine's famous wandering philosopher." Promin'. 13.8-9 (August-September 1972): 15. Port.

"Only the genial civilization of the sunny Ukraine could have produced a philosopher of Skovoroda's simple, kind, and profound nature," says Ewach while making fleeting comparisons of Skovoroda's habits and predispositions to those of other western philosophers. With Hryhorii Skovoroda's portrait.

A323. "Excerpts from Ukrainian Herald no.4" Ukrainian Review (London). 18.2 (Summer 1971): 12-38.

Translations from the unofficially published clandestine journal in Ukraine Ukrains'kyi visnyk (no.4, January 1971) include a detailed report on the trial in Ivano-Frankivsk of Valentyn Moroz (November 17-18, 1970, pp.12-21), protests of witnesses B. Antonenko- Davydovych, I. Dziuba, V. Chornovil (pp.21-22), and a chronicle of repressions and persecutions in which a number of writers and literary scholars are mentioned, among them Ivan Svitlychnyi, Ievhen Sverstiuk, Viktor Ivanysenko, I. Sokul's'kyi, M. Osadchyi, Mykola Horbal, Vasyl' Zakharchenko.

A324. "Expelled from the Writers' Union of Ukraine." ABN Correspondence. 24.1 (January-February 1973): 46-47.

A news item about Vasyl' Zakharchenko who, according to a report in Literaturna Ukraina of 20 October 1972, was expelled from the Writers Union of Ukraine "for anti- social conduct".

A325. "Fal'kivskiy, Dmitriy Nikanorovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 160.

Fourteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about Dmytro Fal'kivs'kyi, the poet who was born 3 November 1898 and died in imprisonment 17 December 1934.

A326. "Famed Ukrainian women." Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 26.10 (November 1969): 27. ports.

Unsigned bio-bibliographical notes on Natalia Kobryns'ka and Uliana Kravchenko with their b/w portraits.

A327. "A famous daughter of the Ukrainian nation. A solemn evening in Kiev in honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Lesya Ukrainka." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.4 (April 1971): 4-6. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original by RATAU in Radians'ka Ukraina. (27 February 1971): 1,3].

Present and sitting in the presidium were P. Yu. Shelest, member of the Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, V. V. Shcherbyts'kyi, member- candidate to the Central Committe of the CPSU Politburo and president of the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSR, and other representatives of the party and the government. The opening address was delivered by Oles' Honchar, president of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine and chairman of the republican jubilee committee. The Russian writer M. S. Tykhonov, chairman of the all-Union jubilee committee, also spoke during the ceremonies. The Digest brought several articles together under the title "Lesya Ukrainka centennial celebrations" [cf. also A1712, A1769], with this particular item entitled simply: "... in Kiev."

A328. Fashchenko, Vasyl'. "Prose works composed of semi- finished products. A sketch for a sociological study of magazine prose." Digest of Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.12 (December 1971): 14-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna. 10 (1971): 138-144].

Fashchenko analyzes the minor prose published in the journals Dnipro, Vitchyzna, Prapor. He concludes that a substantial portion of this material consists of "unfinished works and works that cannot be classified as literature." "Either magazines lack works to publish, or editors lack resposibility and taste," says Fashchenko and complains that "there are very few portrayals of communists", of "active workers and collective farmers" and that many works "have absolutely no ideo-social value." The Digest's title: "A critic censures magazine prose for lack of depth."

A329. "Fear for Rudenko's life." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 224.

A note in the "Chronicle of current events" about an appeal dated 7 March 1979 of Raisa Rudenko on behalf of her husband, the writer Mykola Rudenko, currently a Soviet prisoner.

A330. Fedenko, Panas. "A controversial novel". Bulletin / Institut for the Study of the USSR. 18.1 (January 1971): 19-28.

A review article of Oles Honchar's novel Sobor, published originally in January 1968 in the journal Vitchyzna, and subsequently issued in a limited edition. Fedenko analyzes in detail the contents of the novel and gives a survey of its reception by the critics. According to Fedenko, Sobor was given a positive appraisal in Vitchyzna (1968, no.4, pp.137- 138) by I.Le, an enthusiastic review in Literaturna Ukraina (29 March 1968), but later the character of reception changed, N. Shamota "took objection to a number of 'political innuendos...", N. Fed in Izvestiia accused Honchar of pessimistic tones, and the novel became a subject of criticism at various writers' meetings. Says Fedenko about Sobor: "Oles Honchar's novel is an interesting book which hovers between 'socialist realism' and authentic realism. Strictly speaking, Honchar has committed no 'heresies'. The campaign against the pollution of nature and the campaign for the preservation of cultural monuments are perfectly legal activities - quite apart from their topicality. It is equally permitted to criticize overzealous officials who destroy more than they create. Finally, when Honchar demonstrates, that the people can expect help only from the Party - more particularly, from its apparatchiki - he is merely following the fifty-year old tradition of Soviet literature... On the other hand, the indication that not the Party, only a 'good' or 'positive' secretary can correct a situation and that if he falls ill all hopes may be destroyed amounts to a truth that conflicts with the principles of socialism. The resistance to pollution is legal, but if the author shows that "socialist captains of industry' behave in just the same way as the 'wicked capitalists' - that is, that the drive to fulfill production plans at any price is essentially no different from the drive for profits - this, from the orthodox Communist points of view, is heresy."

A331. Fedorenko, Eugene W. "On the stone" by Mykhaylo Kotsiubyns'ky". Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 277-278.

English summary of a Ukrainian article printed on pp.158-165. The article provides a critical analysis of Mykhailo Kotsiubyns'kyi's short story "Na kameni".

A332. "Fedorenko, Eugene W." Men of Achievement. 5 (1978): 164. port.

Thirty lines of bio-bibliographical data, with portrait, about the Slavic scholar and educator (b.1929).

A333. Fedorenko, H. "To the call of time." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.7 (July 1968): 22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 July 1968): 1].

About a meeting of the Poltava branch of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. Following the April 1968 Plenum of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, says Fedorenko, the Poltava branch "demonstrated the unity and efficiency of the writers' oblast organization and its incompatibility with manifestations of bourgeois ideology..." The Digest's title: "Leadership shake-up in oblast writers clubs."

A334. Fedoriv, Roman. "Speech by Roman Fedoriv." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.5 (May 1970): 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kultura i zhyttia. (12 April 1970): 6].

Fedoriv, editor in chief of the literary journal Zhovten, speaks on the occasion of Lenin's jubilee. "The enemies claim," says Fedoriv, "that Lenin's ideas were brought to the western oblasts of Ukraine "on the points of the bayonettes." But it is thanks to Lenin's ideas that Ukrainian language, hitherto "considered inferior", "is heard in scientific research institutes, in laboratories, in theaters, cinemas, philharmonias..." Digest's title: "Zhovten's editor claims Ukrainian language is flourishing."

A335. Fennell, John. "Literature of the Kievan period, 11th- 12th centuries." In his and Antony Stokes's Early Russian Literature. London: Faber and Faber [©1974]. 11-79.

The first chapter in a book which is meant to be an introductory text for students of early "Russian" literature. In this chapter, Fennell limits his discussion to three topics dealt with in three separate subsections. The subsection devoted to hagiography focuses on three different versions of the murder of the princes Borys and Hlib [Boris and Gleb in text] - those in "Povist' vremennykh let", in the anonymous "Skazaniie i strast'..." and in Nestor's "Chteniie of zhitii i pogublenii..." as well as on Nestor's Life of St. Feodosy of the Monastery of the Caves. The texts of these works are compared and analyzed in some detail. The subsection on homiletic literature concentrates on Ilarion's "Slovo o zakone i blagodati", with an analysis of both its form and content. The third and final subsection is devoted to "Pouchenie" of Prince Volodymyr Monomakh, with a critical commentary. The author uses the term "Kievan Rus'" rather than "Kievan Russia". See also A338.

A336. Fennell, John. "The recent controversy in the Soviet Union over the authenticity of the Slovo." / J.L.I. Fennell. Russia: Essays in History and Literature. Ed. by Lyman H. Legters. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1972. 1-17.

According to Fennell, prior to 1963 few scholars in the USSR expressed any doubts as to the authenticity of the Slovo o polku Ihorevim. The first to do so, says Fennell, was the Soviet historian A.A. Zimin who - in a paper read on 27 February 1963 at a meeting of the Institute of Russian Literature of the Academy of Sciences in Leningrad - claimed that "a textological comparison of the Slovo and the Zadonshchina showed that the Zadonshchina was primary and the Slovo secondary..." Zimin's conclusions, says Fennell, were that "the Slovo was in fact written in the 1770's by Archimandrite Ioil Bykovskii" and that it was Count Musin-Pushkin, book collector and antiquarian, who published it as an original work of the twelfth century. Fennell surveys the reaction to Zimin's hypothesis by Soviet scholars: D. Likhachov, V.P. Adrianova-Peretts, L.A. Dmitriev, R.P. Dmitrieva, O.V.Tvorogov and others who attacked Zimin's arguments as "amateurish, inconsistent, tendentious, and lightweight". It is Fennell's contention that Zimin's work should be taken seriously and final judgment on his hypothesis should be deferred "until the whole of his work has been published".

A337. Fennell, John. "The Slovo o polku Igoreve: the textological triangle." / J.L.I. Fennell. Oxford Slavonic Papers. n.s.1 (1968): 126-137.

A response to the Ilchester lecture, delivered in Oxford in February 1967 by Dmitry Likhachov. [cf. A867]. Likhachov, says Fennell, "pleaded the case for the authenticity of the Slovo o polku Igoreve and the secondary nature of Zadonshchina." Fennell analyzes eleven textual "coincidences" between the Hypatian Chronicle, Zadonshchina and Slovo o polku Ihorevim and comes to a conclusion, contrary to Likhachov's view, that "Slovo had as its sources both Hyp [atian Chronicle] and Zad[onshchina], and that both influenced Slovo independently from each other."

A338. Fennell, John. "The Tale of Igor's Campaign". In his and Antony Stokes' Early Russian Literature. London: Faber and Faber [©1974]. 191- 206.

"No work of pre-nineteenth century literature has had so much research devoted to it as the Slovo o polku Igoreve... Up to 1940 more than seven hundred works connected with the Slovo commentaries, editions, translations - had appeared in a wide range of languages. Since that date the number has probably doubled." Fennel's chapter does not analyze the poem itself, but is devoted exclusively to a critical survey of the scholarly controversy regarding the Slovo's authenticity. Fennell considers the problem of the authenticity of the Slovo not yet solved, but he also questions the sceptics: "we must admit that if it was written in the eighteenth century, its creator was a man of singular genius and almost superhuman knowledge".

A339. Ferguson, Dolly M. "Dmytro Ivanovych Chyzhevsky (1894-1977)." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 2.2 (Fall 1977): 131-133.

An obituary for the world-renown Slavist and literary scholar, author of histories of Ukrainian literature and other books in several languages. Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi (known also as Tschizewskij or Čiževsky) was born in Oleksandria, Ukraine on 23 March 1894 and died in Heidelberg, Germany on 18 April 1977.

A340. Ferguson, Dolly M. "Lyricism and the internal landscape in the early creative prose of Mykola Khvyl'ovyi." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 18.4 (December 1976): 427-441.

Mykola Khvyl'ovyi's reputation as a writer, according to Dolly Ferguson, rests upon two collections of stories published in 1921-1924, in his early experimental period. She examines critically four of these stories: "Ia (Romantyka)", "Kimnata. ch.2", "Iurko" and "Povist' pro sanatoriinu zonu" and comes to the following conclusion: "...the particular form of prose lyricism that transforms the traditional external world of prose fiction at least partially into an internal landscape is in Khvyl'ovyi's early creative prose never concerned merely with the purely private experiences of the lyrical hero. In each of the four stories analyzed here, the objectified internal states and processes of the leading characters are always intricately bound to the great dilemmas of the era." There is a French summary of the article on pp.504-505.

A341. Ferguson, Dolly M. "Lyricism in the early creative prose of Mykola Khvyl'ovy." / Ferguson, Dolly Mary. Dissertation Abstracts International. 39.4 (October 1978): 2254-A - 2255-A.

An abstract of a 1976 PhD dissertation at the University of Toronto. This dissertation, according to the author, is "A study of the lyrical element in Mykola Khvylovyi's first two collections of stories Blue Etudes and Autumn." "Lyricism is found to be more pervasive than has generally been recognized and to subsume the other major peculiarities of his narrative style", says Ferguson. The extent of the dissertation is not indicated, no order no. is given.

A342. Fessenko, Andrew. "Ukrainica in the Library of Congress." Forum. 1.2 (Spring 1976): 26-27, port. of Fessenko on p.27; 1.3 (Fall 1967): 27-28.

A librarian of the Slavic Room at the Library of Congress in Washington discusses some of the important and rare Ukrainian publications available at the Library of Congress, among them a number of literary first editions.

A343. "The fighting translator. Meeting of the Committee for Fine Translation of the Association of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.1 (January 1966): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 December 1965): 2].

The meeting of the committee, chaired by H. Kochur, was devoted to the translating activities of M.Staryts'kyi on the eve of his 125th anniversary. M. Staryts'kyi, says the anonymous author, was active "during the dark period of Ukrainian culture, when the tsarist satrap Valuyev issued the decree of 1863 according to which the Ukrainian language was a 'Little Russian Dialect' and when the law of 1876 decreed 'Translations into the Little Russian dialect are prohibited..." Despite these difficulties, says the article, Staryts'kyi translated Goethe, Krylov, Byron, Nekrasov, Shakespeare, Mickiewicz, Pushkin, Lermontov, Zhukovskii and other foreign writers and was the first Ukrainian translator of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" which was published in Ukrainian in Kyiv in 1882. The Digest's title reads: "Recall traditions of fine translation."

A344. Fireside, Harvey. "Valentyn Moroz: individualist in jeopardy." ABN Correspondence. 27.6 (November-December 1976): 34-40.

Excerpts from the article published originally in Survey [cf. A345].

A345. Fireside, Harvey. "Valentyn Moroz: individualist in jeopardy". Survey. 22.1 (98) (Winter 1976): 132-140.

"Moroz has become a symbol of post-Khrushchev repression in the Soviet Union, for the draconic sentences imposed on him for what are essentially 'thought crimes', as well as for his courage in refusing extreme pressure to recant his views," says Fireside. The author surveys Moroz's experiences in the Soviet penal system and the reaction in the West, but his main focus is on the analysis of Moroz's known writings. "...the publications of Moroz prior to his arrest exhibit little evidence of either originality or ideological dissent," says Fireside. He goes on to analyze Moroz's works published in English, i.e. Report from the Beria Reserve [cf. B062] and Boomerang [cf. B061]. Both of these collections, in his view, are important as products of samvydav and as corpus delicti for the indictment of Moroz on charges of "agitation or propaganda designed to undermine or weaken Soviet power."

A346 . "The first day. A report on the constituent meeting of Kiev's Union of Writers of Ukraine organization." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.4 (April 1969): 19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (28 February 1969): 1.

The Kyiv organization of the Union of Writers of Ukraine was established following a decision of the 3rd Plenum of the Union's Executive Board. According to this news item, the organization will unite 437 Kyiv writers and will be the largest of its kind in the country. The meeting elected V. Kozachenko as chairman, with Platon Voronko, Vitalii Petliovanyi [Petlyovanyy] and Borys Oliinyk [Oliynyk] as deputies and Oleksandr Diachenko [Dyachenko] as executive secretary.

A347. "First edition of Eneyida purchased by Harvard." Ukrainian Review (London). 19.4 (Winter 1972): 55.

A news item reprinted from Harvard Ukrainian Studies Newsletter about the acquisition by the Houghton Library of Harvard University of Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi's Eneida published in St. Petersburg in 1798. Eneida is characterized here as "the first major literary work written in coloquial Ukrainian" and "a landmark of modern Ukrainian literature". The purchase of this first edition - at the price of $850 - was made possible through the Bayard L. Kilgour Fund.

A348. "The first stories by Volodimir Drozd..." Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 11. port.

An unsigned bio-bibliographical note about Volodymyr Drozd, with his black and white portrait. The note advertises the newly published Ukrainian edition of Drozd's book Doroha do materi and characterizes the book as "a captivating story about Sophia Bohomolets whose revolutionary activity led to her arrest by the czarist authorities at a time when she was to give birth to her son Olexandr" who later won fame as a pathophysiologist.

A349. "Five Ukrainian dissident writers become members of PEN." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.2 (Summer 1978): 220-221.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events" quoting a letter from Kathleen V. Simpson, secretary of the Writers-in-Prison Committee of the International PEN to Ostap Tarnavs'kyi [Tarnawsky], president of the Ukrainian Writers' Association "Slovo". According to this news item, five Ukrainian dissident writers presently incarcerated in the USSR were awarded honorary membership of the International PEN, i.e. Vasyl' Stus - of the English Center, M. Osadchyi - of the Swiss Center, M. Rudenko - of the French Center, D. Shumuk - of the Australian Center and V. Chornovil - of the Dutch Center.

350. Fizer, John. "Conceptual affinities and differences between A.A. Potebnja's theory of internal form and Roman Ingarden's stratum of aspects." American Contributions to the Seventh International Congress of Slavists. Warsaw, August 21-27, 1973. v.1. Linguistics and Poetics. Ed. by Ladislav Matejka. The Hague: Mouton, 1973. (Slavistic printings and reprintings, 295). 101-115.

A study of fundamental issues of literary aesthetics focusing on similarities and differences in the views of Oleksandr Potebnia and Roman Ingarden. Fizer's contention is that the concepts of "internal form" in Potebnia and "aspects" in Ingarden (both, in the author's opinion, derived from Humboldt-Steinthal's psychologism in Potebnia's case and from Husserl's phenomenology in Ingarden) "concerned themselves with one and the same issue, i.e. with that complex propensity of the verbal sign or symbol in literary art which evokes in its perceiver visual, auditory, or even kinesthetic experiences of the sense-datum."

A351. Fizer, John. "Dmytro I. Chyzhevs'kyi (1894-1977)." The Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the United States. 13. 35- 36 (1973-1977): 370-372.

An obituary article about Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi (aka Dmitry Čiževsky or Dmitrij Tschizevskij), the "world renown Slavist, philosopher, mediaevalist, the leading authority on baroque literature" who died in Heidelberg, West Germany on 18 April 1977. Fizer characterizes Chyzhevs'kyi as "a rare and exceptional phenomenon" who succeded in becoming a "renaissance man in a non-renaissance age". Fizer provides a survey of Chyzhevs'kyi's academic interests and his career and makes the following comment about Chyzhevs'kyi's methodology of research: "Unlike many of his contemporaries who conceived of literary art as part of closed ethnic or psychological configurations, he conceived it in the context of specific aesthetic sensibilities, or movements, such as baroque, neo-classicism, romanticism, realism, and modernism that transcend geography and ethnicity. This approach permitted him to suspend most of the extra- literary factors and focus on the 'literariness' of literature."

A352. Fizer, John. "Similarities and differences in Oleksandr O. Potebnja's theory of 'internal form' and Roman Ingarden's 'stratum of aspects'." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974- 1975. 5 (1974-1975): 32-35. Biblio.

Summary of a paper delivered by Rutgers University professor John Fizer and of the discussion which followed. The literature seminar took place on 21 November 1974. According to the report in Minutes, in Fizer's view, there is "a manifest similarity" between Potebnia and Ingarden in regard to "internal form or predstavilenie" (Potebnia) and "schematized aspects" (Ingarden), but "whereas Potebnja does not elaborate on the reasons for image formation, Ingarden presents a detailed description of the reasons for the aspects' perpetual variations or mutations."

A353. Fizer, John. "Some correlations in the aesthetics of A.A. Potebnja and Benedetto Croce." Zbirnyk na poshanu prof. d-ra Iuriia Shevel'ova = Symbolae In Honorem Georgii Y. Shevelov. [Collegium redactorum: William E. Harkins, Olexa Horbatsch, Jacob P. Hursky]. München: Ukrainian Free University, Facultas Philosophica, 1971. (Naukovyi zbirnyk, t.7). 122-128.

"...Croce and Potebnja share many opinions and conclusions," says Fizer. "This similarity of positions is to be traced to their common source, namely Humboldt and Steinthal." However, according to Fizer, "Potebnja and Croce differ considerably on many other aesthetic problems and queries. Therefore the aesthetics of the one is not a replica of the aesthetics of the other." Fizer draws some parallels between Potebnia and Croce and discusses the reasons for their similarity, their views on language and art, the notions of internal form and artistic imagery. "...Potebnja's and Croce's rejection of literary genres as formal categories fundamentally ties in with Romantic criticism, which, too, stressed the supposedly immanent psychological qualities of the poetic work rather than its formal qualities," says Fizer.

A354. Flynn, James T. "The affair of Kostomarov's dissertation: a case study of official nationalism in practice." Slavonic and East European Review. 52.127 (April 1974): 188-196.

Says Flynn: "In 1842 a young student of history at Khar'kov University, N.I. Kostomarov, submitted a dissertation for the master's degree on the history of the Uniate Church. The minister of education, S.S. Uvarov, warned by the Bishop of Khar'kov, found the dissertation to contain dangerous views, ordered the university to destroy all copies and to require Kostomarov to write a new dissertation on a different topic." The author relates the incident and its causes, citing not only Kostomarov's autobiography (put together by his wife after his death), but also a number of other sources, and attempts to answer the question of why Uvarov - despite his fear of Kostomarov's ideas - found it possible later (in 1846) to consent to Kostomarov's appointment to the faculty of St. Vladimir's University in Kyiv. The affair is discussed as an illustration of the "official nationalism" of the tsarist regime as administered by Uvarov, the tsar's minister of education. The author does not mention Mykola Kostomarov's Ukrainian connections, but focuses rather on Uvarov's policy of avoiding public discussion of controversial matters.

A355. "Four Ukrainian political prisoners given honorary membership of PEN." ABN Correspondence. 30.1 (January-February 1979): 41.

A brief news item announcing the adoption by the Canadian Centre of International PEN on 13 September 1978 of four Ukrainian political prisoners - the writers Ihor Kalynets', Ievhen Sverstiuk, Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi and Ivan Svitlychnyi as honorary members of PEN.

A356. "Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.5 (May 1973): 10-11. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (27 March 1973): 1].

Report on a meeting of the Executive Board held on 23 March. V. Kozachenko delivered the main address. Smolych was relieved as chairman for health reasons. Kozachenko was elected first secretary of the Executive Board. Participating in the Plenum were V. Malanchuk, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine and other dignitaries. The Digest's title: "4th Plenum of Ukrainian Writers's Union board. Kozachenko replaces Smolych".

A357. Franko, Ivan. "My Ukrainian patriotism." Forum. 1.1 (Winter 1966/1967): 9.

A passage from the preface to the Polish edition of Franko's "Galician sketches", reprinted with revisions and brief editorial notes from a translation by Clarence A. Manning in his book Ukrainian Literature (1944) [cf. ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B41]. Says Franko: "My Ukrainian patriotism is not sentiment, not national pride, but a great yoke placed by fate upon my shoulders. I can protest, I can quietly curse my fate for placing that yoke upon me, but I cannot throw it off, I cannot seek another country, or I would be base against my own doubts. And if anything lightens for me the burden of this yoke, it is the sight of the Ukrainian people, that, although bent, deafened and demoralized for long centuries; although today poor, awkward and joyless, yet is gradually advancing and perceives somehow in the widest circles the feelings of light, truth, justice and is seeking approach to them. It is worthwhile to work for this people and no honorable work for it is lost."

A358. Franko, Ivan. "Taras Shevchenko, a biographical sketch of the great Ukrainian poet." Forum. 38 (Winter 1978): 4-24. illus.

In 1840, says Franko, "the simple peasant of the village made his entry into literature." Before that time peasants, if they appeared at all were mere episodes. Now the peasant "figures as the hero, and his life is the main theme of interest." This new tendency Franko identifies with Georges Sand, Berthold Auerbach, Kraszewski, Turgenev, Grigorovich and Dostoyevsky. Shevchenko, "a figure for which there is no parallel in world literature, with the possible exception of Robert Burns in Scotland, - a peasant's son who had spent more than twenty years of his life under the yoke of serfdom". "... no sooner had his poems first been printed than this young peasant, so recently a serf, is greeted by the general opinion of his fellow-countrymen as a spiritual leader and the chief ornament of Ukrainian literature." Franko tells the story of Shevchenko's life in considerable detail and concludes by characterizing four distinctive periods in Shevchenko's poetry (1. 1838-1843: ballads, sentimental reflections, historical tales; 2. prior to 1847 - political poems; 3. 1847-1957: small lyric poems of a personal character; 4. 1858-1861: poems with religious themes). Franko describes Shevchenko's poetry as "poetry of the yearning for life, a free life, unhindered development of the individual and of all society." According to Franko, "The suffering of humanity and injustice towards humanity always moved him with equal force, whether it was the peasant woman driven to the corvée and forced to leave her child under the corn stocks, or the prince's daughter insulted by her own father, or the maiden sold by her mother to a General; or the little Jewess who took vengeance on her own father for the murder of her student-lover. I know of no poet in the literature of the world who made himself so consistently, so hotly, so consciously the defender of the right of woman to a full and human life." Franko's poetic preamble to his article entitled simply "Taras Shevchenko" and beginning with the lines "He was a peasant's son and became a prince in the realm of the spirit" appears on p.3 The article is illustrated with six Shevchenko portraits, the title page and frontispiece of the first edition of Kobzar, portrait of the Russian poet V. Zhukovsky by Karl Bryulov, Shevchenko's grave at Kaniv, etc. This Franko essay was published originally in Slavonic Review (June 1924) [cf. ULE: Articles in Journals and Collection 1840-1965, A194].

A359. "Franko (nee Khorunzhinskaya, Olga Fyodorovna)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 170.

Seven lines of bio-bibliographical data about Ol'ha Franko (1864-1941), wife of Ivan Franko.

A360. "Franko, Pyotr Ivanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 170.

Bio-bibliographical data (11 lines) about Petro Franko, writer and educator, son of Ivan Franko (b.21 June 1890, d.1941).

A361. Franko, Zynoviia. "Zinovia Franko's open letter." Index on Censorship. 1.2 (Summer 1972): 143.

Granddaughter of Ivan Franko in an open letter published originally in the Ukrainian newspaper Radians'ka Ukraina (2 March 1972) expresses her regrets for having made contacts with friends from abroad, for giving them information about the life in the USSR, for circulating "slanderous anti-Soviet documents".

A362. "Free Moroz" campaign continues." ABN Correspondence. 22.3 (May-June 1971): 36-38.

Text of letters on behalf of Valentyn Moroz addressed to UN Secretary General U Thant and to Prime Minister of Canada Pierre E. Trudeau. Signatures to these letters are being solicited by Ukrainian students. In addition to the two letters there is an overview of the press coverage of the Valentyn Moroz case.

A363. "Free world supports Moroz." Forum. 27 (1975): 29-30, port.

An unsigned report on the activities in the United States and Canada on behalf of Valentyn Moroz, called here "the most widely known Ukrainian political prisoner." At the time of this writing Valentyn Moroz was still imprisoned in the USSR, while two books of his: Boomerang [cf. B061] and Report from the Beria Preserve [cf. B062] were attracting considerable attention in the West.

A364. "A friendly meeting." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 24. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 May 1971): 1].

Diplomatic staffs of consulates of socialist countries met on the 28 April 1971 with Ukrainian writers. Oles Honchar, Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi, V. Kozachenko, V. Korotych and O. Mykytenko spoke at the meeting about achievements of Ukrainian writers and preparations for the upcoming congress to be held in May. Digest's title: "Writers meet with diplomats from socialist countries."

A365. Frolova, Klavdia. "Literary criticism and its tools." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.5 (May 1975): 8-10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (11 March 1975): 2-3].

Title supplied by Digest editors reads: "Drach cleared of charges of 'intellectualism'." According to Frolova, "There is a fundamental difference between Drach's enthusiastically optimistic depiction of the working class in the 1970's and the portrayal of workers in the poetry of the 1960's in general, as well as in that of Drach. Despite the great desire to glorify the ordinary working man..." [these earlier poems] "are all marked by the absence of that important moment when the individual described becomes aware of his role in society, and this automatically stamps him with passivity, creating the impression that the working man is not master of his fate. In the cycle Podykh Donbasu, on the other hand, the miners emerge as masters of their lives, their fates, and their country..." says Frolova about Drach's poetry.

A366. "From contemporaneity's high demands." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.7 (July 1968): 20-21. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 July 1968): 1].

A report about a meeting of the editorial board of Literaturna Ukraina. I. Zub, the editor-in-chief, according to this news item, "analyzed the paper's recent activity", "discussed its defects" and "outlined the steps taken... to improve its image and raise its standards." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "The April Plenum aftermath. Literaturna Ukraina recants."

A367. "From positions of Leninist esthetics." Digest of Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.5 (May 1970): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. 24 March 1970): 2].

A report on the meeting of the Union of Writers' of Ukraine Commission on Criticism. L. Novychenko, Ievhen Adelheim, S. Kryzhanivs'kyi, M. Ostryk, H. Syvokin', V. Ivanysenko, I. Dzeverin and N. Kuziakina spoke at the meeting and participated in the discussion about "partiinist" and "narodnist'" in Soviet Ukrainian literature. The Digest's title: "Critics discuss party spirit and national character in literature."

A368. "From the editor of the Digest." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.1 (January 1967): 1.

An editorial note introducing a series of speeches at the Fifth Congress of Writers of Ukraine, which took place in Kyiv November 16-19, 1966. The note characterizes the Fifth Congress as one "marked by a relatively open discussion of the present state of Ukrainian literature, Ukrainian language and Ukrainian publications". [cf. A471, A705, A1055, A1372, A1430, A1564, A1636, A1664, A1757].

A369. "From the editors of the magazine Vitchyzna. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.4 (April 1967): 19. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (17 February 1967): 4].

A response to the criticism for the publication of Ia. Stupak's story "Hordynia" [cf. A027]. The statement reads, in part: "The publication of this short story constitutes a serious political mistake on the part of the editors. The editors wish to stress that the content and spirit of the short story "Hordynya" deeply contradict the general ideological and artistic direction of the magazine..."

A370. "From the International PEN Congress." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 65.

An unsigned editorial note about the reaction of the Moscow newspaper Literaturnaia gazeta to a resolution of the 34th International PEN Congress meeting in New York in June 1966. The resolution condemned "repressive acts against authors by the Turkish, Ukrainian Soviet and Peking China governments."

A371. "From the position of Leninist Party spirit. Broadened Executive Board meeting of the Kiev Writers' organization of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. The order of the day - Problems of contemporary criticism." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.4 (April 1972): 11-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (3 March 1972): 1].

The meeting discussed new demands from literary criticism in view of the recent party resolutions [cf. A1127]. V. Kozachenko "stressed that the resolution of the CC CPSU applies not only to criticism but to literature as a whole". Iu. Zbanats'kyi, S. Kryzhanivs'kyi and L. Novychenko also spoke at the meeting. "It is sad to see that quite a few critics have lowered their standards with respect to the socialist saturation and class orientation of new works. Criticism, for example, was much too late in pointing out the ideological-cultural deviations present in V. Drozd's "Katastrofa" (Catastrophe), Ye. Hutsalo's "Mertva zona" (Dead zone) and R. Andriashyk's novel "Poltva" (The Poltva River). Some critics even attempted to artificially counterpose the younger generation of writers to the oleder," said Zbanats'kyi. Volume 8 of the recently published history of Ukrainian literature was also criticized for "certain tendentiousness, lack of objectivity".

The Digest's title connects this article with the previous one about the Party resolutions [i.e.A1127]: "... and by the Kiev writers' organization".

A372. "Further details about the trials." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.1 (Spring 1971): 10-12.

Additional details about the trial of Valentyn Moroz. [See also A1580]. Reprinted from the Chronicle of Current Events (no.17, 31 December 1970), published clandestinely in Moscow.

A373. "Further persecutions in Ukraine: Melnychuk sentenced - his works destroyed. Iryna Senyk before the occupation court." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.4 (Winter 1973): 77-80.

According to this news report, the poet Taras Melnychuk (b. 1933), author of a poetry collection Nesimo liubov planeti (1967), was sentenced in the Spring of 1972 in Ivano- Frankivsk to "3 years in a correctional-labour colony of severe regime for anti-Soviet propaganda" and "after his imprisonment... two suitcases of his unpublished poems were burnt by the KGB." Also it is reported that the poet Iryna Senyk has been sentenced to 6 years imprisonment and 5 years of exile at a 3-day closed trial in Ivano-Frankivsk. The date of the trial is not given.

A374. Gaboda, Mary. "Ivan Franko [sic] first love." Based on articles by M. Vozniak which appeared in The Canadian Farmer of November 9,16,23,30, 1927. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.4 (Winter 1966): 54-65.

A detailed study of Ivan Franko's relationship with Ol'ha Roshkevych, based on personal reminiscences of Ol'ha's sister Michaelina, and on Franko's letters to his beloved, with extensive quotations from these letters. The article ends with Franko's poem written for Ol'ha's marriage "Often I dream about the days" ["Ia zhaduiu mynuleie zhyttia"] in Vera Rich's translation. (16 lines, p.65).

A375. "Galan, Iaroslav Aleksandrovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 42-43. Biblio.

An unsigned 34 line-note (plus bibliography) about Iaroslav Halan (1902-1949), author of short stories, plays and political pamphlets in which, says GSE, "he exposed bourgeois- nationalistic and clerical reactionaries." His plays, according to this note, are "characterized by political acumen and tense dramatic conflict."

A376. "Galan, Yaroslav Aleksandrovich (pseudonym: Rosovich, Volodimir, Yaga)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 177.

Bio-bibliographical data (27 lines) about the writer and publicist Iaroslav Halan. Dates of birth and death are given as 14 July 1902, 24 October 1949.

A377. "Galiatovskii, Ioannikii." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 50. Biblio.

A note of 12 lines about Ioannikii Galiatovs'kyi, "Ukrainian writer and clergyman" who died in 1688.

A378. Galkina, I.K. "Muratov, Igor' Leont'evich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 236. Biblio.

Ihor Muratov's (1912-1973) poetic works, according to Galkina, "reflected the lofty moral world of his contemporaries and their exploits in battle and in labor". (21 lines).

A379. Garaeva, Muza. "Zakhar Berkut." Ukraine. 3(11) (1972): 18-19. illus., part col.

About the film Zakhar Berkut, based on Ivan Franko's novel and produced by the Kyiv Dovzhenko Studios. The article is illustrated with 4 photos from the film, 3 of them in color.

A380. "Gart". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 101.

A 13-line note about HART, a "union of Ukrainian proletarian writers", organized in 1923.

A381. "Gasko, Mechislav Edmundovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 169.

Mechyslav Hasko was a poet born in 1907 (23 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A382. "Gavrilyuk, Aleksandr Akimovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 183.

Bio-bibliographical data (14 lines) about the poet Oleksandr Havryliuk who was born 23 April 1911 and was killed in an air raid 22 June 1941.

A383. "Gerasimenko, Konstantin Mikhailovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 308. Biblio.

A 15-line note about Konstantyn Herasymenko, a poet and playwright (born 1907, died 1942).

A384. "Gerasimenko, Konstantin Mikhaylovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 186.

Brief bio-bibliographical data about the poet and playwright Konstantyn Herasymenko, born 11 May 1907 and killed in action in September 1942.

A385. "A giant of Ukrainian science" / V.M. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.3 (March 1971): 12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 January 1971): 2].

A report about a jubilee session held 13-14 January at the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR to commemorate the centennial of birth of Ahatanhel Kryms'kyi. Kryms'kyi is characterized by this article as "orientalist, historian, philologist, folklorist and writer". The Digest's title: "Academy of Sciences celebrates centennial of A. Krymskyy."

A386. "Girnyk, Nikolay Andreevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 179.

Bio-bibliographical data about Mykola Hirnyk, a poet born 1923 (29 lines).

A387. "Gizel', Innokentii." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 416. Biblio.

Innokentii Gizel' (born ca. 1600, died 1683) is identified here as "Ukrainian historian, writer, and political and religious figure". (9 lines).

A388. Glazovsky, Leonid. "Writers' round table." Soviet Life. 5 (176) (May 1971): 14-15. illus.

The following editorial note appears at head of title: "Preparing this issue, Soviet Life arranged a gathering of Ukrainian authors of different generations. Our round-table talk dealt with the writer's place in and his responsibility to society." Twenty Ukrainian writers participated including, among others, Petro Panch, Pavlo Usenko, Iakiv Bash [Yakov Bash], Mariia Pryhara [Prigara], Ievhen Hutsalo [Yevgen Gutsalo], Roman Lubkivs'kyi [Lubkovsky] and Vitalii Korotych [Vitali Korotich]. "It was not so much an exchange of opinion as a collective meditation on the essence of literary work," says Glazovsky. The topics discussed were the recently discovered diary of Pavlo Tychyna, the coming plenary meeting of the Writers' Union of Ukraine, translations from other literatures into Ukrainian, the social role of literature.

A389. "Glebov, Leonid Ivanovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 426. Biblio.

About Leonid Hlibov (1827-1893), characterized in this 20-line unsigned note as "Ukrainian poet and writer of fables".

A390. "Golovanivsky, Savva Yevseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 185.

A 42-line bio-bibliographical note about Sava Holovanivs'kyi, poet and playwright born 1910.

A391. "Golovatskii, Iakov Fedorovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 256. Biblio.

An unsigned note of 20 lines about Iakiv Holovats'kyi (1814-1888), characterized by GSE as "one of the founders of the new Ukrainian literature in Galicia..."

A392. "Golovko, Andrey Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 186.

Bio-bibliographical data about the writer Andrii Holovko born 1897. (38 lines).

A393. "Gonchar, Oles' (real name: Aleksandr Terentevich)". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 187-188.

A 50-line bio-bibliographical note about Oles Honchar, the novelist born 1918.

A394. "Goncharenko, Ivan Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 188.

Ivan Honcharenko, born 1908, was a poet. (39 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A395. "Gordienko, Konstantin Alekseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 190-191.

Kost' Hordiienko was a prose writer born 1899. (29 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A396. Görlich, Joachim G. "Ukrainian literature between persecution and the thaw." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.2 (Summer 1966): 49-50.

The political thaw, according to the author, first began in Ukraine in 1956 "after it occurred in Poland". The movement was initiated by the publication of Dovzhenko's "The Enchanted Desna", and the first poems of Lina Kostenko. Later, from 1958 to 1961, "a frost interrupted the thaw in Ukrainian literature", says the author, but in 1961 a new thaw began, Lina Kostenko, after a three-year silence, published a new volume of poetry and new names emerged in Ukrainian literature: Ivan Drach, Mykola Vinhranovs'kyi, Vitalii Korotych.

A397. Gotteri, N.J.C. "A neglected regularity in the Kiev Missal." Slavonic and East European Review. 51.124 (July 1973): 445-447.

The author discusses the seven folios known as "Kyivs'ki lystky", "Kiev Missal" or "Kiev folios", attempts to demonstrate certain important orthographical regularities displayed by the text and concludes that "certain contractions had taken place and been firmly established very early indeed".

A398. "Grabianka, Grigorii Ivanovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 325. Biblio.

A nineteen lines note about Hryhorii Hrabianka (d.1738) who is characterized here as "Ukrainian chronicler of the cossaks".

A399. Grabowicz, George G. "A critique of Čyževs'kyj's History of Ukrainian Literature." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1977-1978. 8 (1977- 1978): 71-74. Biblio.

A summary of the seminar that took place on 27 April 1978 and of the discussion which followed. The speaker, Harvard University professor, took issue with Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi's views: 1/ on literature as existing apart from other spheres of human activity and consequently as being subject to "immanently literary criteria"; 2/ on the "incompleteness" of Ukrainian literature and 3/ on the designation of style as the basis and criterion for the literary process in general and for its periodization in particular.

A400. Grabowicz, George G. "A decade of Tyčyniana." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.1 (March 1978): 119-129.

A review article of books by and about Pavlo Tychyna published since the poet's death (1967) in the Soviet Ukraine.

A401. Grabowicz, George G. "The history of Polish-Ukrainian literary relations: a literary and cultural perspective." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1977-1978. 8 (1977-1978): 23- 25. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read at the seminar on 3 November 1977 and of the discussion that followed the presentation. The speaker, Harvard University professor, proposed four basic periods of Polish-Ukrainian relations: 1/ from from late 16th century on - the period of Polish Renaissance and Polish and Ukrainian Baroque; 2/ the period of Romanticism, 3/ the post- Romantic period up to World War II and 4/ the post-war period. According to the speaker (as reported in the summary) "for various periods of time, the Polish relationship to Ukrainian culture or to the Ukrainian sphere (e.g. folklore, history, the land itself) was not mediated by Ukrainian literature per se. This, of course, was a natural consequence of the objective political and social balance of power between the two national groups."

A402. Grabowicz, George G. "New directions in Ukrainian poetry in the United States." / George Grabowicz. The Ukrainian Experience in the United States: a symposium. Ed. by Paul R. Magocsi. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute [©1979]. (Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Souces and documents series). 156-173.

The four day symposium on "The Ukrainian experience in the United States" was organized in December 1976 in Boston, as part of the Bicentennial of American Revolution celebrations. Chapter 8 of the book contains the two papers devoted to Ukrainian literature: Grabowicz's article, and the commentary on it by Leonid Rudnytzky. [cf. A1291]. Ukrainian poetry with literary value, in Grabowicz's view, became a cultural phenomenon in the U.S. only after 1950. He classifies this poetry according to generations of poets: 1/ those who began writing and publishing before the Second World War and continued their work in the U.S. with "the near- total absence of any development"; 2/ those who started writing in the D.P. camps after the war and whose work is "characterized by a thematic and formal conservatism"; and 3/ the generation represented by the New York Group of Poets, who, in Grabowicz's view, are the only ones with "literary vitality". It is the New York Group that is the focus of Grabowicz's article. He speaks of their "thematic innovation" (life in the city, an existential sense of belonging, eroticism and alienation, "radical personalism", "internalization of the external world"), as well as their formal innovations: "reliance on a freely associative stream of consciousness, "the destruction of the turgid 'poetic language'... of the preceding generation", "the introduction of surrealist poetics". Singled out for special attention are Iurii Tarnavs'kyi and Emma Andievs'ka. Quotations from their oeuvre are given in the original Ukrainian, without translation.

A403. Grabowicz, George G. "Pavlo Tyčyna." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2 (1971-1972): 78-80. Biblio.

A summary of the seminar that took place on 20 April 1972 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at Harvard University, spoke about the recent publication of Tychyna's collection of poetry V sertsi u moim (Kyiv, 1970). The speaker's conclusions, according to this report,: "...the poems of this collection taken in conjuction with the available canon, unequivocally demonstrate the gradual and organic process of Tyčyna's poetic development. Although the poetry of the chronological poles will show dashing extremes, there is no readily apparent point of demarcation, no moment in time when one could isolate an absolute stylistic or thematic break. Moreover, the changes that do occur are motivated in the overall structure of Tyčyna's creativity and are much more intrinsic than the argument of simple political expediency assumed."

A404. Grabowicz, George G. "The poetry of reconstitution: Pavlo Tyčyna's V serci u mojim." Recenzija. 2.2 (Spring 1972): 3-29.

A review article of Pavlo Tychyna: V sertsi u moim. Virshi ta poemy iz nedrukovanoho i pryzabutoho. Kyiv: Dnipro, 1970. 302 p. Grabowicz considers this publication of Tychyna's "unpublished and largely forgotten" poetry - a "posthumous rehabilitation" of Tychyna, a "prelude to a restoration of Tyčyna's full dimension". This is needed because, in Grabowicz's opinion, "the polemically sharpened half-truths... still interfere with objective criticism." The present collection, apparently, is not complete: it does not include poems considered to be too sensitive by Soviet critics, among them "Skorbna maty", "Zamist' sonetiv i oktav", "Chernyhiv". Nevertheless, according to Grabowicz, it demonstates unequivocably "the gradual and organic process of Tyčyna's poetic development." "While the poetry of the chronological poles will show... clashing extremes," says Grabowicz, "there is no readily apparent point of demarkation, no moment in time when one could isolate an absolute stylistic or thematic break." Excerpts from Tychyna's poetry quoted in text are given in the original Ukrainian, without translation.

A405. Grabowicz, George G. "Toward a history of Ukrainian literature." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.4 (December 1977): 407-523.

An extensive review-article of Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi's A History of Ukrainian Literature: From the 11th to the End of the 19th Century. Translated by Dolly Ferguson, Doreen Gorsline and Ulana Petyk. Edited with a foreword by George S.N. Luckyj. (Littleton. CO: Ukrainian Academic Press, 1975). [cf. B006]. Grabowicz takes issue with Chyzhevs'kyi's concept of an "incomplete literature of an incomplete nation", with his "designation of style as the basis and criterion of the literary process" and with his "pervasive downgrading of the cultural context." Grabowicz's stated goal is to articulate an alternative and, in his view, "more accurate and more functional model of Ukrainian literary history". This review-article was published in 1981 as a book in the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute Monograph series. [cf. ULE, 1980-1989; B040]. See also a rebuttal by George S.N. Luckyj, the editor of Chyzhevs'kyi's History, A901.

A406. Grabowicz, George G. "Tyčyna's Černihiv." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1975-1976. 6 (1975-1976): 19-21. Biblio.

Summary of a paper read by Harvard University professor George G. Grabowicz and of the discussion that followed the presentation. The seminar took place on 30 October 1975. Grabowicz, according to this summary, took issue with the views prevalent among Soviet and émigré critics, and claimed that Tychyna's poetry collection Chernihiv "is neither a detour nor an aberration in Tyčyna's work, but a centerpiece of his oeuvre and an important literary achievement." Chernihiv, claimed Grabowicz, "establishes tensions and ironies between the thematic and the formal spheres, through which orthodox ideology is counterbalanced by subjective nuances." Among the new elements introduced by the poet in this collection, Grabowicz lists "the complex polyphony of voices, the verbal inventiveness, the emotional overtones ranging from warm sympathy to irony and even parody.

A407. Grabowicz, George G. "Tyčyna's Černihiv." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.1 (March 1977): 79-88, 89-113.

Pavlo Tychyna's poetry collection Chernihiv, published first as a separate book in 1920, then censored and not fully reprinted in Soviet editions after 1932, is, in Grabowicz's view, "nothing less than a 'missing link' in the complex evolution of the poet; it is a key to understanding the road... from Sonjašni kljarnety and Pluh to Partija vede and the later poetry." The collection Chernihiv, says Grabowicz, "highlights the various changes that occur in Tyčyna's poetry - of thematic forms, of prosodic and linguistic devices, of the poet's ideology and his stance with respect to the represented world. It does this by virtue of an artistry that is unique in both its condensation and the brevity of its flowering. As with all the previous collections, the style and Weltanschauung of Černihiv is peculiarly its own, but this is also the last collection to express the range of poetic complexity that is associated with Tyčyna's earlier poetry; the later poetry, i.e. that which remained unimpaired by the official desideratum of a leveling to the lowest common denominator, achieved its aesthetic effects by different, 'simpler', and more traditional means." As to the proper genre of Chernihiv, Grabowicz considers it to be not a reportage, or "veristic dramatic portrait", but "a vision, a distillation of the popular Ukraine in transition, presented through the verbal analogue of a musical composition - not a "symphony" like Skovoroda, but a cantata." The article is interspersed with brief quotations of poetry in the original Ukrainian, without translation. Pages 79-88 contain a reprint of what appears to be the full Ukrainian text of the eight-poem collection.

A408. "The great and the earthly." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 6-7. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 May 1971): 1,3].

The Digest's title: "The Vasyl Stefanyk centennial". According to this unsigned report, Vasyl' Stefanyk's centennial was celebrated in the village of Rusiv, the writer's birthplace. Among the thousands of participants were Ukrainian writers O. Honchar, Iryna Vil'de, Ivan Drach, Dmytro Yeryomin, Mykola Karpenko, Iakiv Bash, Georgian writer Djaba Asatiani, Lithuanian writer Julus Butenas, Russian writer Yuriy Syanenko, Azarbaidzani writer Kendzhali Navruz, Stefanyk's sons Semen and Kyrylo, two grandsons and representatives of the government.. A bust of Vasyl Stefanyk - the work of the artist Volodymyr Skolozdra and the architect Myron Venzelovych - was unveiled in Rusiv on this occasion.

A409. "A great people's poet." Ukraine. 1(17) (1974): 24. illus.

Adapted from the last chapter of the book Taras Shevchenko: a biographical sketch by Maxim Rylsky and Alexandr Deich [cf. B079]. "A great poet is the voice of his epoch. He may be glorifying the heroic past of his nation, but his eyes are always directed to the future. In a class society based on social and class inequality, on the oppression of man by man, a great poet is always on the side of the oppressed against the oppressors." Illustrated with the title page of the book and Shevchenko's portrait from its frontispiece.

A410. "The greatness of Krasnodon. Days of Soviet literatures in Voroshylovhrad oblast." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.2 (February 1972): 5-6. [Excerpts. Original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 December 1971): 1].

About a series of literary readings by Soviet writers for workers', miners' and farmers' audiences in Krasnodon, Lysyche on the Dinets, Krasnyi Luch and Voroshylovhrad. Among the Ukrainian writers participating were V. Kozachenko, V. Sobko, M. Upenyk, Pavlo Hlazovyi, I. Svitlychnyi. The Digest's title reads: "Celebrate days of Soviet literatures in Voroshylovhrad oblast".

A411. "Grebenka, Evgenii Pavlovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 364-365. Biblio.

An unsigned note of 25 lines about Ievhen Hrebinka (1812-1848), called here a "Ukrainian and Russian writer".

A412. "Greetings to the writers' convention." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.3 (March 1966): 19-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 February 1966): 1-4].

The republican conference of prose writers was addressed by Borys Buriak [Buryak] who spoke about the achievements and problems of the last seven years. Among the problems discussed were the "problem of creating an artistic figure of a communist", "the language spoken by the heroes of our novels", love and sex in literature and "the need of studying the experiences of the best representatives of foreign literature". D. Zatons'kyi, Y. Adelhaym, M. Levchenko, S. Kryzhanivs'kyi, A. Khorunzhyi, S. Zhurakhovych, P. Zahrebel'nyi, R. Ivanychuk participated in the discussion.

A412a. Gregorovich, Andrew. "Argentine's Shevchenko." Forum. 18 (Fall 1971): 10-13. illus.

An illustrated report about the unveiling ceremonies of the Taras Shevchenko monument in Buenos Aires on 5 December 1971. According to Gregorovich, the unveiling was attended by some 10,000 participants, including U.S. Ambassador John D. Lodge, Canada's Ambassador Alfred P. Bissonet and representatives of Ukrainian communities in Argentina, Canada and the United States. The Shevchenko statue, created by Leo Mol, stands at El Liberator and Durregeira streets in Buenos Aires.

A413. Gregorovich, Andrew. "An interview with Ivan Franko's daughter". Forum. 1.1 (Winter 1967): 6-8. illus.

Gregorovich, the editor of Forum, reports on a visit to Anna Franko, the only daughter of Ivan Franko and the widow of Dr. Peter Kluchko. The visit took place in Toronto on 18 November 1966. Gregorovich describes Anna Franko's apartment and relates the conversation he had with the writer's daughter, herself an active writer, 74 years old, now retired from her former job as a nurse. The discussions range from family matters, her brother Taras Franko living in Kyiv, her father's manuscript of a history of Ukrainian literature which she would like to see published, her husband who died in Salzburg in 1948, her two sons Taras and Myron who came with her to Canada in 1951. Anna Franko comments on a variety of subjects: religion, plans for the I. Franko Home for the Aged, the Ivan Franko Museum in Winnipeg, the Franko family genealogy, the relations of I. Franko with M. Hrushevs'kyi, etc.

A414. Gregorovich, Andrew. "Ivan Kotlyarevsky: founder of modern Ukrainian literature." Forum. 10 (Fall 1969): 5-9. illus.; 11 (Winter 1969-1970): 16-19. illus., port.

A two part, richly illustrated, article about Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi. Part 1 provides a detailed biography, pt.2 attempts a critical appraisal of his works. Kotliarevs'kyi, says Gregorovich, "has sometimes been criticized for writing a travesty and using a ribald, satirical and humorous genre for the book that was to become the foundation stone of Ukraine's modern literature. Yet his judgment has proven correct because his book was so popular and so widely read that its impact was lasting... Ukrainian literature's Eneida is a lusty work somewhat akin to the role Boccaccio's erotic Decameron played in establishing Italian literature..." [Kotliarevs'kyi's] careful style, joined to his magnificent humor, resulted in a lasting work of genius which firmly established the Ukrainian literary language." Gregorovich also discusses the popularity of Kotliarevs'kyi's plays "Natalka Poltavka" and "Moskal-charivnyk" and the writer's subsequest posthumous fame. Among the illustrations is a full page b/w portrait of Kotliarevs'kyi on p. 7, as well as such illustrations as Shevchenko's drawing of Kotliarevs'kyi's house in Poltava, title page of 1798 edition of Eneida, book illustrations to Eneida, reproduction of the manuscript title page of "Natalka Poltavka", Kotliarevs'kyi's monument, etc.

A415. Gregorovich, Andrew. "Lesia Ukrainka monument unveiled in Toronto". / A.G. Forum. 30 (1975): 15-19. illus.

A richly illustrated reportage about the unveiling of Michael Chereshniovsky's statue of Lesia Ukrainka in Toronto on 19 October 1975. A full page photo of the monument is on p. 18. Lesia Ukrainka's younger sister Isidora Borysova was one of the participants and her portrait appears on p.17. The ceremony consisted of speeches, including some by Canadian federal and provincial government representatives, performances by several choirs and an orchestra, and a banquet the previous night attended by 400 guests.

A416. Gregorovich, Andrew. "Nicholas Kostomarov, 1817- 1885". Forum. 1.2 (Spring 1967): 10-11. port.

This article about Mykola Kostomarov discusses his life and work with a focus on his contributions to historical studies. The following two paragraphs characterize Kostomarov's literary works: "His writings, scholarly and literary, fill twenty volumes. Among his literary works written under the pseudonym Jeremy Halka are the novels Kudeyar and Chernihivka, the drama "Sava Chaly" (1836) and the tragedy "Pereyaslav Night" (1841). Some professors have criticized Kostomarov for the inaccuracies in his scholarship which were due to his rapid work. On the other hand, his scholarly works are fascinating to read because of their fine literary style and the way in which Kostomarov dramatized his historical studies. He gave the central characters a vivid, and perhaps somewhat romantic, treatment." Excerpts from Kostomarov's article "Dve russkiya narodnosti", originally published in Osnova in 1861, appear on p.12 under the title "The Ukrainians and the Russians".

A417. "Grigorenko, Gritsko (pseud. of Aleksandra Evgen'evna Sudovshchikova-Kosach). Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 425. Biblio.

A sixteen lines unsigned note about Oleksandra Sudovshchykova-Kosach (1867- 1924) who wrote under the pen name Hryts'ko Hryhorenko. According to GSE her works "presented a truthful picture of the impoverishment of the masses of peasants, the backwardness of the countryside before the revolution, and the hard life of peasant women."

A418. "Grigorenko, Gritsko (real name: Sudovshchikova-Kosach, Aleksandra Yevgen'yevna)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972).

Bio-bibliographical data (12 lines) about Hryt'sko Hryhorenko (Oleksandra Sudovshchykova-Kosach) who was born in 1867 and died 27 April 1924.

A419. Grigorenko, Petro. "My friend Mykola Rudenko." Tr. by Bohdan Nahaylo. Index on Censorship. 8.1 (January-February 1979): 33-36, 38, 40. illus., port.

A personal memoir about Mykola Rudenko, currently serving his term in the Mordovian labor camp no.19, by a former Soviet general, prominent dissident and one of the leaders of the USSR human rights movement. Grigorenko describes his meetings and his friendship with Rudenko, provides a biography of the writer and some comments on his literary and publicistic work. Says Grigorenko about Rudenko the poet: what is most important is his "spirituality, faith in people and love for them, and the high standards he set for himself. His themes are varied. Cosmic and human themes tend to predominate. But there is also much that is devoted to national and personal themes... Often personal, human, national and cosmic motifs are all interwoven." About Rudenko's role as head of Ukrainian Helsinki monitoring group, his activities in Amnesty International, his critical writings about the Soviet system and his courageous stand vis-a-vis the KGB, Grigorenko says: "It is difficult to overestimate the magnitude of Rudenko's achievement"... For a long time to come Economic Monologues will be a useful weapon in the struggle for truth. His poems and verses will stir the hearts not only of our contemporaries; they will help our successors to oppose darkness, lies and evil, to fight for light, for truth and for human souls... His behaviour at the trial and afterwards will be a source of inspiration to those who embark on the course of defending human rights and seeking national liberation." There is an editorial note about what is called the "seventh anniversary of the 'Great Pogrom' in Soviet Ukraine", i.e. the arrests of 1972 and their aftermath. On p.38, in the text of Grigorenko's memoir two poems of Rudenko are quoted in English translation "It's so easy: just recant" (20 lines)["Tak prosto vse: napyshesh kaiattia"] and an excerpt from the poem "The Cross (The false prophets have brought you" (7 lines) ["Khrest (Ne shkoduiu, ni, shcho buv marksystom)".

A420. "Grinchenko, Boris Dmitrievich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 434. Biblio.

A twenty-three lines note about Borys Hrinchenko (1863-1910). "A number of his stories and novellas describe the difficult life of the peasants... The image of the idealized liberal enlightener is characteristic of several of his dramas...", says the unsigned note.

A421. "Grinchenko, Mariya Nikolayevna (literary pseudonyms: M. Zagirnya, M. Chaychenko, M. Dolenko, etc)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 216.

Bio-bibliographical data (14 lines) about Mariia Hrinchenko (b.1863, d.15 July 1928).

A422. "Grushevskiy, Mikhail Sergeyevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 219.

Forty-three lines of bio-bibliographical data about Mykhailo Hrushevs'kyi, literary historian and writer, president of Ukrainian National Republic. (b.17 September 1866, d.25 November 1934).

A423. "Gruzinskiy, Aleksandr Sergeyevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 220.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines) on Ukrainian philologist and paleographer Oleksandr Hruzins'kyi (b.1881, d.11 January 1954).

A424. "Grymaylo, Yaroslav Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 205.

A bio-bibliographical note of 44 lines about the writer Iaroslav Hrymailo born 1906.

A425. "Gudzii, Nikolai Kallinikovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 472. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note (18 lines) about Mykola Gudzii (1887-1965), a literary historian whose principal research, according to this note, was "ancient Russian literature" and "Russian and Ukrainian literature of the 18th to the early 20th centuries..."

A426. "Gudziy, Nikolai Kallinikovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 222.

Twenty-nine lines of bio-bibliographical data about the literary historian Mykola Gudzii (1887-1965).

A427. "Gulak, Nikolai Ivanovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 476. Biblio.

A 13-line note about Mykola Hulak (1822-1899), "one of the organizers of the Society of Cyril and Methodius", according to the note.

A428. Gulak-Artemovskii, Petr Petrovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 476. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note (21 lines) about Petro Hulak-Artemovs'kyi (1790-1865) who, according to the unsigned note, "...gained fame with the satirical fable 'The Master and the Dog' (1818), which condemns the tyranny of landowners over their serfs."

A429. "Gureev, Aleksey Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 208.

Bio-bibliographical data about Oleksa Hureiv, poet and prose writer born 1913. (27 lines).

A430. "Gustynskii chronicle". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 496-497. Biblio.

A fourteen line note about Hustyns'kyi litopys, "a Ukrainian chronicle compilation of the late 16th and early 17th century..."

A431. "Gutsalo, Yevgeniy Filippovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 211.

Bio-bibliographical data about the writer Ievhen Hutsalo, born 1937. (15 lines).

A432. "Gzhitsky, Vladimir Zenonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 211.

Thirty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Volodymyr Gzhyts'kyi born 1895.

A433. "Hanna Barvinok." Promin'. 10.6 (June 1969): 15. Port.

A brief unsigned biographical note, with portrait.

A434. Hantula, Richard. "Highlights of the Skovoroda jubilee." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.2 (June 1977): 249-254.

A review article discussing four books by or about Hryhorii Skovoroda, namely Povne zibrannia tvoriv u dvokh tomakh / H. Skovoroda, edited by V.I. Shynkaruk [Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1973, 2v. 532 p.; 576 p.]; Filosofiia Hryhoriia Skovorody / AN UkrRSR, Instytut filosofii. [Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1972, 312 p.]; Hryhorii Skovoroda: biohrafiia / Leonid Makhnovets' [Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1972. 256 p.] and Skovoroda: Dichter, Denker, Mystiker / Dmitrij Tschižewskij. [Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 1974. 234 p. (Harvard series in Ukrainian studies, v. 18)].

A435. Hantula, Richard. "The vocabulary of Zerov's sonnets." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1970-1971. 1 (1970-1971): 42-44. Biblio.

A summary of the paper read at the seminar on 2 March 1971 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, a Ph.D. candidate in Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University, analyzed the vocabulary of all the original sonnets by Mykola Zerov through the application of quantitative methods. According to this report, "Zerov's sonnets exhibit an extraordinary number of nominal forms, while verbs are relatively few"; they exhibit also a variety of substantives, centering on concepts of non-animate nature and man, as well as time, light and space.

A436. "Harasevych, Maria". Who's Who of American Women. 10th ed. (1977-1978): 366.

Fifteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the literary critic Maria Harasevych (b.1918).

A437. "Harasevych, Maria". World Who's Who of Women. 4th ed. Ed. director: Ernest Kay. Cambridge: International Biographical Centre, 1978. 482. port.

Thirty-seven lines, with portrait, about the literary critic Maria Harasevych.

A438. Harasimchuk, Les. "Shevchenko encyclopedia." Ukraine. 2(10) (1972): 17.

An interview with Vasil Borodin about the planned publication of an encyclopedia devoted to Shevchenko's life and work and to Shevchenko studies.

A439. Harasimchuk, Les. "Shevchenko encyclopedia." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.554 (47) (January 1973): 23.

About the two-volume Shevchenko encyclopedia being prepared by scholars of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in Kyiv. The work, according to Vasil Borodin and Heorhiy Shved, will contain 2,190 articles covering Shevchenko's life, his literary and artistic activities, his environment, links with foreign literatures and commemoration events held in his honor.

A440. "Harvard to publish Ukrainian series." Forum. 8 (Spring 1969): 23.

A list of 25 titles "slated for publication in 1969-70", selected by the editors of "Harvard series in Ukrainian Studies". Some of the titles are on literary topics, i.e. "The Igor Tale as a historical document" by O. Pritsak, "Ukrainian epic songs" by Katerina Hrushevsky (2 v.); "Eyewitness Cossack Chronicle of the 17-18 sent. (Litopys Samovydtsia) (2 v.), "Studies of the Versification of Taras Shevchenko" by Kiril Taranovsky.

A441. "Harvard University offers faculty post to Moroz". ABN Correspondence. 26.1 (January-February 1975): 33.

A news report about a letter of invitation sent by Derek C. Bok, President of Harvard University to Valentyn Moroz inviting him to spend the academic year 1975-1976 as a scholar at the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard.

A442. Harvey, Elizabeth Anne. "Ivan Franko quinquagenery celebrations in London 1966." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 93-95.

The fiftieth anniversary of Franko's death, according to this article, was commemorated in London by two events: a poetry reading on May 8th and a concert on September 25th. The May program consisted of Franko's poetry in Vera Rich's translations read by actors and poets Diana Ollsson, Ted Hazleton, Robert Armstrong, John Nicholson, Elizabeth Anne Harvey. The concert program in September included the singers M. Skala-Starycky, Ulyana Chaykivska, Odarka Andriyishyn, the actress Rosamund Greenwood and young poetry reciters Oksana Hutsul and Olya Andrusyshyn.

A443. Hawryluk-Charney, Halia. "Centenary commemoration of Lesya Ukrainka (February 25, 1871 - August 1, 1913)." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 22.2 (254) (February 1971): 12-13.

An article about Lesia Ukrainka's life that quotes the text of five stanzas of her poem "Contra spem spero (Het'te dumy, vy khmary osinni)" ["Contra spem spero (Thoughts, away, you heavy clouds of autumn)"] in Vera Rich's translation on p.13. With some comments on Lesia Ukrainka's early poems and on "Lisova pisnia" ["Song of the forest"] - called here a "delightful fairytale".

A444. "He translates favorite poem so Canadian children can enjoy it." Ukrainian Quarterly. 27.4 (Autumn 1971): 420.

A note of 13 lines in "Ucrainica in American and foreign periodicals" about an article by Joan Phillips published in St. Catharine's Standard on 9 January 1971. The article is about Bohdan Melnyk, a resident of St. Catharine and about his translation into English of Ivan Franko's poem Lys Mykyta ("The Sly Fox").

A445. Heinrich, Lisa Lynn. "The Kievan Chronicle: a translation and commentary." Dissertation Abstracts International. 39.4 (August 1978): 915-A.

Abstract of a 1977 PhD dissertation at Vanderbilt University.

According to the abstract, part 1 provides the translation based on the Hypatian Chronicle (Ipats'kyi litopys). Part 2 "looks at the Kievan Chronicle as literature", examines the content, specific topical aspects, types and levels of style, literary devices, etc. This dissertation, 615 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no. 7812419.

A446. "Hel' and Osadchy transferred to Lviv, Svitlychny to Kyiv." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.1 (Spring 1975): 47-48.

According to this news report, political prisoners are being transferred from camps in Mordovia and Perm back to Ukraine for further interrogation. This, allegedly, has happened to the writers Chornovil, Osadchyi and Svitlychnyi.

A447. "Heliy Snehirov arrested." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.4 (Winter 1977): 446.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events" (24 lines) reporting the arrest of the writer Helii Snehirov on 22 September 1977.

A448. "A heritage of writers in Ukrainian and world literature". Ukrainian Canadian. 31.615 (109) (October 1978): 34-35. ports.

Black and white portraits of Lviv writers in a special issue of the journal devoted to the city of Lviv. Names and dates are the only captions for the picture gallery comprised of the following nine writers: Markiian Shashkevych [Markian Shashkevich] (1811-1843), Ivan Franko (1856- 1916), Denys Lukiianovych [Denis Lukianovich] (1873-1965), Volodymyr Hnatiuk (1871-1926), Mykhailo Pavlyk (1853-1915), Stepan Tudor (1892-1941), Oleksandr Havryliuk [Oleksander Havriliuk] (1911-1941), Iaroslav Halan [Yaroslav Halan] (1902-1949) (photo of monument) and Iurii Mel'nychuk [Yuri Melnychuk] (1921-1963).

A449. "High standards - the criterion of artist's civic responsibility". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.4 (April 1967): 17-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Molod' Ukrainy. (25 February 1967): 2].

The meeting of the Central Committee of Komsomol discussed "the ideological and artistic shortcomings of the first issue for 1967 of Dnipro..." The editors of Dnipro were accused of "political vagueness and subjectivism", "low ideological and political impact". Singled out as "artistically immature" and "weak from the ideological point of view" were "Doroha" - a poem by B. Oliinyk, "Spraha" - a novel by Yu. Ivanchuk [later R. Ivanchuk, perhaps Roman Ivanychuk] and poems by Iu. Serdiuk [Yu. Serdyuk]. The Digest supplied title reads: "'Dnipro' editors told to watch ideology. Their colleagues at 'Vitchyzna' recant." [See also A369].

A450. Himka, John Paul. "The life and times of H.S. Skovoroda". Novi napriamy=New Directions. [pt.I]: 6.4 (Fall 1973): 12-15. (illus); pt.II: 1.1 [sic] (Summer 1974): 32-36. illus.

Himka provides a background of Ukrainian intellectual history, characterizes Skovoroda as a baroque writer and philosopher who not only used the baroque form but had a baroque Weltanschauung, includes a number of prose excerpts from Skovoroda's writings as illustrations and supplements his essay with a critically annotated bibliography of important publications by and about Skovoroda.

A451. A History of the U.S.S.R. Comp. by K. V. Bazilevich et al. Ed. by A. M. Pankratova. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1947-1948; New York: Kraus Reprint Co., 1970. 3 v. in 1. illus.

Fragments related to Ukrainian literature in this general history of the Soviet Union appear as follows: "The culture of Kiev Rus" (pt.1, pp. 59-61, illus.); "The Lay of Prince Igor's Regiment" (pt. 1, pp.72-73); "Ukrainian culture [18th century]" (pt.2, p.81); "Ukrainian literature" [first half of the 19th century], pt.2, pp.202-206 [mostly about Shevchenko with his portrait on p. 205; "Shevchenko hated the Russian tsar and the Russian landlord serfowners. But he had a profound love for the Russian people, Russian writers and revolutionaries who fought, as he did, for the freedom of the people," says this entry. Seven lines of Shevchenko's poem "Zapovit (Iak umru, to pokhovaite)" ["When I am dead (...rise up)" are quoted in Jack Lindsay's translation on p.205]; "The culture of the peoples of Tsarist Russia in the 'sixties and 'seventies": pt.2, pp.262-263. Other references to Ukrainian writers appear only in general overviews with Russian and other writers of the USSR.

A452. Hizha, Olexandr. "Doyen of Soviet Ukrainian prose." Ukraine. 3(7) (1971): 18. port.

Commemorating the 80th birth anniversary of Petro Panch. Photo shows Panch opening the Congress of Ukrainian Writers in Kyiv. In surveying Panch's literary heritage, Hizha singles out Holubi eshelony ["The Blue Echelons" in text] as "an extraordinary literary creation in Ukrainian prose of the 1920's" and the novel Homonila Ukraina ["Ukraine Seethed" in text] as "one of the best works of historical fiction in Soviet Ukrainian prose".

A453. Hlynsky, Boris. "Ivan Franko's naturalism and Zola." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1976-1977. 7 (1976-1977): 12-14. Biblio.

Summary of the seminar held on 21 October 1976 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, professor of Layette College, analyzed Franko's views on the French writer Emile Zola and the influence of Zola on Franko's naturalistic manner, his themes and style (especially in such works as "Ripnyk").

A454. Holoborod'ko, V. "Allow us to introduce you - 'Dnipro' Publishers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.6 (June 1972): 20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 April 1972): 4].

A report on an exibit of "Dnipro" publications which opened in Kyiv on 10 April to commemorate the publisher's 50th anniversary. "Dnipro", according to this report, is the largest publishing house of literary works in Ukraine and publishes some 200 books per year in editions totaling about six million copies. In the last five years, according to Holoborodko, out of the 1080 titles published, 735 works were by Ukrainian prose writers, poets, playwrights and critics. The Digest's title: "Exhibition of Dnipro publications opened in Kiev".

A455. Holoborod'ko, V. "Before the jubilee of H.S. Skovoroda." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.6 (June 1972): 12-13. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 April 1972): 4].

About a meeting of the Republican Jubilee Committee that took place in Kyiv on the 24 of April and was chaired by I.K. Bilodid. Holoborod'ko reports on the proposals and measures taken to celebrate Skovoroda's jubilee in all republics of the Soviet Union. The festivities are supposed to end on the 12th of December in the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow. Two volumes of Skovoroda's works, a literary biography, and a monograph on Skovoroda's philosophy are to be published in Moscow. Ukrainian publishing houses are preparing 22 different titles to be issued in 570,000 copies. Among other plans, as reported: restoration of monuments, a documentary film, Skovoroda's name to be assigned to a Soviet ocean liner and to a street in Moscow. The Digest's title: "Prepare to commemorate 250th anniversary of H. Skovoroda".

A456. Holoborod'ko, V. "In a wreath of friendship". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.2 (February 1973): 11. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 January 1973): 3].

About a solemn meeting of writers held on 28 December 1972 to mark the half-century jubilee of the Soviet Union. The Digest's title: "Kiev writers mark 50th anniversary".

A457. Holoborod'ko, V. "On the eve of the H.S. Skovoroda jubilee." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 November 1972): 1].

About a meeting of the Republican Jubilee Committee planning the commemoration of Skovoroda's 250th birth anniversary. Holoborod'ko reports on the various activities planned, talks and lectures, books to be published, the opening of the literary-memorial museum in the village of Skovorodynivka in the Kharkiv oblast, etc. The Digest's title: "All-Union Skovoroda Jubilee Committee reports on projects and forthcoming festivities".

A458. Holovanivs'kyi, Sava. "In an abundant land" / Sava Holovanivs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.11 (November 1970): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (9 October 1970): 2].

Impressions of a literary reading in Kirovohrad in which the author participated. Holovanivs'kyi describes the enthusiastic reception by readers, but complains about the non- delivery of books from the Book Trade's central warehouse in Kyiv. The Digest's title: "Kirovohrad oblast hosts Ukrainian writers".

A459. Holowinsky, Ivan Z. "Psychological interpretation of profound emotions in selected writings of Taras Shevchenko."/ Ivan Z. Holovinsky. Ukrainian Review (London). 23[sic].3 (Autumn 1976): 30-38.

Not only was Shevchenko "writing about anxiety, despair, love, hate, human conflict; he experienced them, he knew them, they were shaping his personality," says Holowinsky. He analyzes selected Shevchenko poems, "especially those that deal with positive and negative emotions" and draws attention to the exceptionally positive treatment of the mother-son theme and the portrayal of a profound conflict in the mother-daughter relationship, profound emotions associated with sexual crimes such as incest & rape, etc.

A460. Holovkin, V. "Patriotic duty of an artist." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.6 (June 1969): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kul'tura i zhyttia. (8 May 1969): 1-2].

Chairman of the political administration of Kyiv's Red Flag military district, major-general of the Soviet army, reminds writers that they are "soldiers in the ideological front" and are obliged "to uphold unwaveringly the principles of party and nation in literature and art, oppose ideological diversity of the enemy..." He also speaks about the literary readings ["days of poetry"] organized by his district which are held monthly and in which many writers participate. The Digest's title: "General instructs writers on purpose of literature."

A461. Holutiak-Hallick, Stephen P. "More on Franko and the Nobel prize." Forum. 8 (Spring 1969): 31.

A letter to the editor from a graduate student. The letter calls attention to J.B. Rudnyc'kyj's findings and investigations re the problem of Ivan Franko's candidacy for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1916. According to this note, following J.B.Rudnyc'kyj's findings, the author states that Franko was one of 29 candidates, that his name was placed in nomination by Josef Zastyrec of Vienna and seconded by Harald Hjarne of Uppsala. The 1916 prize was awarded to the Swedish poet Verner von Heidenstam.

A462. Honchar, Oles'. "Beneath the symbol of Leninist ideas. Opening remarks by Oles' Honchar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.3 (March 1969): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 February 1969): 1].

Honchar's speech was delivered at the Third Plenum of Union of Writers of Ukraine, in the Palace of Culture, Kyiv. Lenin, according to Honchar, even before the Revolution, "defended the right of tsarist-oppressed national cultures" and "branded the chauvinistic policy of autocracy, for example, when observance of the Shevchenko jubilee was prohibited." Lenin, says Honchar, received in 1921 a delegation of Ukrainian peasants who spoke to him in Ukrainian; Honchar cites testimony of a participant in this meeting where Lenin, supposedly, asked the Ukrainian peasants if works of Shevchenko, Franko and Kotsiubynskyi were avialable in Ukrainian villages. In present circumstances, says Honchar, when a "gigantic conflict of ideologies is going on... life itself demands more aggression and more Leninist militancy from our critics..." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Oles' Honchar reminds writers of Lenin's opposition to tsarist chauvinistic policies."

A463. Honchar, Oles'. "Closing address by Oles Honchar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.4 (April 1969): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (21 February 1969): 3].

Honchar's "closing address" was at the Third Plenum of the Writers Union Executive Board. Honchar called for greater responsibility and honesty of literary critics. "...criticism... has the means to direct, raise and activate all literature. But occasionaly, without meaning to, it can actually stop literary development...", says Honchar. The Digest title: "Honchar reminds critics of need for honesty."

A464 Honchar, Oles'. "The flower of our national language." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 23-25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 July 1976): 2].

Honchar speaks of the "steadily growing prestige of the Ukrainian literary language", and feels that the credit for this should be given to Ukrainian literature. "... today all that is important, interesting, and talented appearing in print in Ukraine also attracts notice in other republics, is translated into Russian and other fraternal languages and acquires all-Union publicity...". The Digest's title: "Honchar's eulogy on the Ukrainian language". With an editorial note.

A465. Honchar, Oles'. "Following the summons of Lenin's era." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.5 (May 1970): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kultura i zhyttia. (12 April 1970): 2].

Honchar spoke on 9 April 1970 at the Plenum of Ukraine's creative unions held to commemorate Lenin's 100th birth anniversary. He said, among other things,: "Our literature has no need to shun great questions. It has no need to avoid the most complex questions, including these 'eternal problems', as long as it does not treat them in an abstract and timeless manner, but, instead, they grow out of real life and stem from a profound knowledge of the laws of social development and the psychology of modern man." The Digest's title: "Honchar: Let us not shun 'eternal problems' in literature".

A466. Honchar, Oles'. "Fourth All-Union Congress of Writers. Today's truth and passion. speech by Oles' Honchar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.7 (July 1967): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 June 1967): 3].

Honchar makes a plea to the Russian central media to pay more attention to national cultures and literatures, "to communicate with the life of national literatures, instead of standing indifferently aside during discussions of principal import", and not to resort to "vulgarizations on the subject". Says Honchar: "Those predicting an eclipse of national cultures may prove to be poor prophets indeed. Flowering of social cultures is not an empty phrase, it is the reality of our time." The Digest's supplied title: "At writers congress Honchar charges little interest in non-Russian literatures".

A467. Honchar, Oles'. "Immortal Poltavian". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.10 (October 1969): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 September 1969): 2].

A tribute to Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi on the 200th anniversary of his birth. Says Honchar: "In an atmosphere of unheard-of suppression he acquired a strength of spirit to rise, as a confirmed humanist, in the defense of mankind, to realize the great dignity of the worker, to feel the beauty of the national language. Because of Kotlyarevs'kyy, the national language became a literary one." The title supplied by the Digest: "Honchar commemorates Kotlyarevs'kyy's bicentenery."

A468. Honchar, Oles'. "Meeting at a new stage." / Oles Gonchar. Soviet Literature. 5 (1966): 142.

Reflections about literature on the occasion of the forthcoming Fourth Congress of Soviet Writers. "Uniformity is the death of art," says Honchar. "The vital strength of our literature lies in the wealth and diversity of its forms and stylistic schools. The literary process exists as a continuous up-going movement and we are justified in expecting our writers, especially our young writers, to embark on ever new quests displaying creative imagination and daring; at the same time we must be able to discriminate between pseudo-innovation and any really new word that may be uttered in literature." There is no indication anywhere that Honchar is a Ukrainian writer.

A469. Honchar, Oles'. "Oles Gonchar spoke of his own Ukrainian literature and of problems common to Soviet literature as a whole." Soviet Literature. 11 (1967): 130-132.

Honchar's speech is part of the "Review of the debate contributions" of the Fourth Congress of Soviet Writers. "A writer is always unusually sensitive to the phenomena of life. The writer's mature, independent thought, however sharp and probing it may be, should not be deformed or simplified by anyone; this is not in the interests of our society," said Honchar.

A470. Honchar, Oles. "Speech by Oles Honchar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.10 (October 1973): 11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 September 1973): 2].

Honchar spoke at the unveiling of the Lesia Ukrainka statue in Kyiv. [No date of the unveiling is given]. Honchar says that Lesia Ukrainka's "creativity has gained worldwide recognition in our times..." He expresses gratitude to Moscow "for the numerous translations and publications of the works of Lesia Ukrainka into the language of Pushkin and Tolstoy..." and to the Communist Party for creating "the appropriate conditions for the treasures of art and human culture to become truly nationwide possessions." The Digest's title: "Honchar terms unveiling 'celebration of our culture'."

A471. Honchar, Oles'. "Ukrainian Soviet literature on the eve of the great fiftieth anniversary. Speech by the chairman of the Union of Writers of Ukraine, Oles' Honchar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.1 (January 1967): 3-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (17 November 1966): 3-5].

Honchar speaks at the Fifth Congress of Writers of Ukraine of the recent accomplishments of Ukrainian literature in prose, poetry, translations from and into Ukrainian, cultural exchanges with other countries. He expresses his dissatisfaction with what he calls "anti-literature - a great mass of literary cud...", with lags in publishing, with vulgarity and poor taste in humor and satire, with the unsatisfactory state in the field of drama, with a certain passivity of literary criticism. "The only trend we condemn," says Honchar, "is the trend of opportunist incompetency; to all the other artistic trends and styles, inclinations and tastes conditions for healthy creative competition should be encouraged." The Digest's supplied title: "Honchar speaks on state of the (writers) union."

A472. "Honoring Yaroslav Halan." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 14-15. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 August 1972): 2].

About the various meetings and literary evenings in Lviv, Lutsk and Odessa dedicated to the memory of the writer Iaroslav Halan.

A473. Hontar, Ivan. "Concerning foreign classics."/ I. Hontar. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.12 (December 1976):24. [Full text. Original Ukrainian in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 October 1976): 4].

A note about the publication by the Dnipro Publishing House in its "Essays on Classics of Foreign Literature series" of two new monographs: one on Victor Hugo by D. Nalyvaiko [Nalyvayko], the other on Ivan Vazov, the Bulgarian writer, by M. Hol'berg [Hol'berh?].

A474. Hontar, Ivan. "A new Dnipro series." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.8 (August 1969): 18. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 July 1969): 1].

About a new series of Dnipro Publishing House called "Masterpieces of World literature". The plan, according to Hontar, calls for "200 volumes of works by the finest progressive writers in the world, beginning with Homer's Iliad." A novel by Heinrich Mann ["Der Patrioteer" in text, probably Der Untertan] is the first book in the series. In preparation are Aeneid by Virgil and works by Henri Barbusse, Anna Seghers, Emile Zola and Mark Twain. The Digest's title: "Plan world literature series".

A475. Hontar, Ivan. "The works of Anatole France."/ I. Hontar. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.12 (December 1976): 24. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 October 1976): 4].

According to this news item, a new five-volume subscription edition of the works of Anatole France is about to be published in a Ukrainian translation by Dnipro Publishers. Vol.1 has already appeared in print. The Digest's title for this and previous article reads" "New edition of A. France announced. Foreign classics series offers two new monographs."

A476. Horak, Stephan M. "Constantin Bida, 1916-1979." Nationalities Papers. 7.2 (Fall 1979): 244-245.

An obituary for the Ukrainian Canadian literary scholar who was born on 24 September 1916 in Lviv and died on 11 April 1979 in Ottawa.

A477. Horak, Stephan M. "Roman Smal-Stocki, 1893- 1969." Slavic Review. 29.1 (March 1970): 165-167.

An obituary article. Roman Smal-Stocki, a scholar of East European area studies, also wrote on Ukrainian literature, especially on Shevchenko and was chairman of the Shevchenko Memorial Committee of America that was responsible for the erection of the Shevchenko monument in Washington, D.C. Born on 9 January 1893 in Chernivtsi, he died on 27 April 1969 in Washington.

A478. Horbal', Mykola. "Declaration of Mykola Horbal' in defence of I. Kalynets." ABN Correspondence. 26.5 (September-October 1975): 22-23.

A declaration by Mykola Horbal', a political prisoner, smuggled out to the West from the Perm concentration camp. The declaration is dated October 1974 and is addressed to the Prosecutor of the RFSSR. According to this declaration, Ihor Kalynets', a fellow prisoner, was deprived of a visit from his family on 28 August 1974. To protest the groundless deprivation of family visits which have become prevalent, some 20 fellow prisoners have declared a hunger strike in support of Ihor Kalynets'. Horbal' brings to the attention of the Prosecutor the fact that the pre-planned visits are prohibited after the family has already arrived at the camp, that prisoners expressing solidarity with Kalynets' were punished, etc.

A479. Horbal', Mykola. "Declaration by Mykola Horbal' in defence of Ihor Kalynets'." Ukrainian Review (London). 21 [i.e.22].3 (Autumn 1975): 20-21.

See annotation under A478.

A480. "Horbal, Mykola Andriyovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 38.

Eleven lines about the imprisonment of the poet Mykola Horbal'.

A481. "Horno". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 541.

A note (11 lines) about "an organization of Western Ukrainian proletarian writers" which came into being in Lviv in 1929 and published the literary journal Vikna. According to GSE, Horno propagated ideas of socialist revolution, established ties with Soviet literature, and struggled against bourgeois nationalism. It ceased to exist in 1933 "in connection with the fascist terror in Poland..."

A482. Hoshovs'kyi, Bohdan. "An outline of Ukrainian children's literature." In his Ukrains'ka dytiacha literatura: sproba ohliadu i problematyka. Toronto, New York: Ob'iednanna Pratsivnykiv Dytiachoi Literatury im. L. Hlibova, 1966. 111-114.

An English summary of a Ukrainian book that discusses the history of children's literature in Ukrainian and includes, in addition, letters of Oleksander Oles written to the author and sub- sections about the journal Dzvinok and the writers Katria Hrynevycheva, Roman Zavadovych and Ivan Franko.

A483. Hrushevs'kyi, Mykhailo. [Fragments] In his A History of Ukraine. / Michael Hrushevsky. Ed. by O.J. Frederiksen. Hamden, CT : Published for the Ukrainian National Association by Archon Books, 1970.

Literature is discussed only incidentally in this 1970 reprint of the one volume general history issued originally by Yale University Press in 1941. The following subjects are discussed within the context of more general historical chapters: the Kievan Chronicle [pp.41-42]; Slovo o polku Ihorevim [pp.93-95]; culture and education in Kyivan state [pp.117-122]; 16th century brotherhoods [pp.201-205]; literature and education in Eastern Ukraine (17th-18th centuries) [pp.411-416]; Kotliarevs'kyi [pp.477-478]; Kyrylo-Metodiivs'ke bratstvo, Shevchenko, Shashkevych et al. [pp.483-499]; Franko et al. [pp.509-511]. Some literary texts are quoted in English translations as illustrations: the bylyny [text beginning: "The red sun has gone to rest" pp.49-50; text beginning: "Volha was then fully alert" pp.52-54]; fragments from Slovo o polku Ihorevim [pp.94-95, 153], dumy [pp.156, 160-161]; T. Shevchenko: "Tarasova nich (Na rozputti kobzar sydyt'" (The night of Taras) / Tr. Alexander J. Hunter [16 lines, p.261].

A484. "Hryhorij Savych Skovoroda." / L.W. Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 29.10 (December 1972): 26-27.

An article on the occasion of the 250th birth anniversary of Hryhorii Skovoroda (1722-1794). The focus is on biography with some popular explanation of Skovoroda's philosophy, his opinions about the Bible and his theory of education. "In his poetry." says L.W., "he stressed the great value of personal and social freedom."

A485. Hughes, Olga. "The rediscovery of Old Russian literature." Russian Review. 38.2 (April 1979): 215-222.

A review article of three books which deal, at least partly, with the literature of Kyivan Rus', namely Razvitie russkoi literatury X-XVII vekov: Epokhi i stili by D.S. Likhachov [Leningrad: Nauka, 1973. 254 p.], Russkiaia stikhotvornaia kul'tura XVII veka by A.M. Panchenko [Leningrad: Nauka, 1973. 280 p.] and Early Russian literature by John Fennell and Anthony Stokes [Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974. 295 p.].

A486. Huhel', Khrystya. "A word from a student." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.9 (September 1974): 11-12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 July 1974): 2].

Grade 10 student of Secondary school no.53 in Lviv responds to an article by Ivan Bondar in Literaturna Ukraina (no.18, 1974). In her view, the curriculum is overloaded. "15 writers in 9 months (in grade 10) are too many," says Huhel'. Now that her school days are almost over, she finds that she is now older and more experienced and can appreciate better older works such as dumy and writers such as Skovoroda and Vyshens'kyi. The Digest's title: "High school student considers literature courses 'overloaded'."

A487. Humesky, Assya. "The fable in Ukrainian literature of the 17th and 18th century." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 75-77. Biblio.

Summary of a paper read at the seminar on 29 March 1973 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, University of Michigan professor, gave a critical evaluation of an anthology of Ukrainian fables [Baiky v ukrains'kii literaturi XVII-XVIII st. V.I. Krekoten', ed. Kyiv: 1963] and provided an analysis of the differences between the classical fables found in the textbooks of this period, the fables found in Ioannikii Haliatovs'kyi's and Antonii Radyvylovskyi's sermons, translations of Lodovico Gvicciardini's fables, fables from the collection of Ithyka Hieropolikyka and fables of Skovoroda.

A488. Humesky, Assya. "Soviet Ukrainian fable." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 78-80. Biblio.

Summary of the seminar held on 30 March 1973, including the discussion that followed the presentation. The speaker traced the development of the Soviet fable from the time during and after the revolution and singled out the fabulists Ellan Blakytnyi, Mykyta Hodovanets' and Serhii Pylypenko. The fable, according to Humessky, was revived only during and after World War II and finally came into its own after the death of Stalin. Today, in her view, it is one of the leading genres in Ukrainian literature with practitioners such as A. Kosmatenko, P. Kliuchyna and P. Slipchuk.

A489. Humesky, Assya. "A worthwhile publication: an annotated guide to Ukrainian literature in English translation." / A. Humecka. Tr. by M.T. [i.e. Marko Tarnawsky]. Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 34.9 (October 1977): 28.

A note - translated from the Ukrainian daily Svoboda - about a section on Ukrainian literature in the 12th ed. of The Reader's Adviser: a Layman's Guide to Literature (New York: Bowker, 1977) compiled by Edward Kasinec [called Kasynets in text] [cf. A637].

A490. "Hypatian Chronicle." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 10 (1976): 103.

Ipats'kyi litopys is characterized in this entry as "the most valuable source for the history of southwestern Rus' prior to the late 13th century, and it is remarkable in the secular quality of a number of its narratives." (23 lines + bibliography).

A491. "I. Sokulskyj subjected to torture in Vladimir prison." ABN Correspondence. 24.5 (September-October 1973): 39.

Ivan Sokul's'kyi, a young Ukrainian poet (born in 1940), since May 1972 in the Vladimir prison, was accused of being the organizer of a joint hunger strike of Ukrainians and Jews and was subjected subsequently to intensive interrogation by the camp KGB. According to this news report, "Heavy police methods of interrogation were used."

A492. Iacheikin, Iurii. "What are you reading currently?" / Yuriy Yacheykin. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 25. [Excepts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 November 1968): 3].

A polemical article ridiculing A. Shevchenko's article about literary critics. [cf. A1375]. Digest's title: "Denounces 'folksy' literature for artistic ineptitude."

A493. Ianchenko, Anatolii. "Behind the Prapor cover." / Anatoliy Yanchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.5 (May 1968): 2. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 March 1968): 1].

Ianchenko reports on a field meeting of the secretariat of the Writers Union of Ukraine that was held in Kharkiv. The main topic under discussion was the journal Prapor. The journal's poetry was reviewed by V. Korotych, the prose - by M. Malynovs'ka, criticism - by S. Telniuk, political writing - by Iu. Bedzyk. Says the author: "The speeches carried overtones of anxiety about native literature and language." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Writers converge on Kharkiv".

A494. Iaremenko, Vasyl'. "Letter to the editors." / Vasyl' Yaremenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.11 (November 1973): 15. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (25 September 1973): 3].

Vasyl Iaremenko is the author of the introductory article to selected works of Oleksander Oles' (Tvory. Kyiv: Molod', 1971). He was recently criticized for seriously deviating from Marxist-Leninist ideology. Says he in his letter to the editors: "Having reread my article on O. Oles several times, I fully agree with and accept the criticism published in Komunist Ukrainy and Literaturna Ukraina. I deeply regret that my enthusiasm for the selection of lyric poems included in the publication.... caused me to deny the readers an all-round party appraisal of the political and class positions of the poet..." The Digest's title: "Author of introduction to Oles' works repents his liberal views."

A495. Iarmysh, Iurii. "Contrary to life's truth. On the occasion of Borys Kharchuk's most recent works for children." / Yuriy Yarmysh. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.11 (November 1973): 12-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 September 1973): 3].

Iarmysh examines Kharchuk's stories, such as "Povstans'kyi kin'", "Teplyi popil", "Smak vyshen'" and his story collections Zazymky i vesny (1967) Horokhove chudo (1968), Pomsta (1970) and Materyns'ka liubov (1972). What he finds, he says, arouses in him "both astonishment and indignation". Says Iarmysh: "Our planet remains the battlefield of a fierce class struggle and to substitute 'general humanitarian' ideas for precise class concepts, to indulge in unsubstantiated criticism under the pretext of portraying the negative side of life in books for the young generation is to take a contemptible stance." The Digest's title: "Kharchuk's children's books scored for distorting Soviet reality".

A496. Iarmysh, Iurii. "The party education of Communist writers." / Yuriy Yarmysh. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.7 (July 1974): 9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 July 1974): 1].

Iarmysh reports on the various theoretical seminars in the party education network of the Kyiv organization of the Writers Union of Ukraine, as well as of the party organizations at the journals Literaturna Ukraina, Dnipro, Vitchyzna, Vsesvit, Raduga. The title supplied by the Digest: "Report on Party education of Kiev writers".

A497. Iatsenko, M.T. "The ideological struggle and the myths of bourgeois literary criticism and aesthetics."/ M.T. Yatsenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.2 (February 1977): 19-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo 1 (January 1976): 61-73].

Soviet literary scholarship, says the author, "systematically exposes the idealistic and counterrevolutionary fabrications of bourgeois-nationalist literary scholarship regarding both the pre-October and the contemporary periods..." Iatsenko, in his attempt to join this type of undertaking, attacks the "bourgeois theory of nation and the evolution of national culture" as formulated by P. Kulish, V. Antonovych, M. Hrushevs'kyi and D. Dontsov and the "falsifiers of literature and culture of every stripe" who, in his view, currently apply these ideas in their own work. He specifically criticizes D. Chyzhev'skyi's history of Ukrainian literature (published in New York in 1956), D. Kozii's article on the Shevchenkian man and Oleksandra Chernenko's essay on Kotsiubyn'skyi - the impressionist published in the émigré journal Suchasnist.' The Digest's title: "Western literary critics accused of 'deliberately distorting historical truth'."

A498. "Ideological integrity and passion in creativity". / Reviewer. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 24-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 May 1973): 1,3].

Following the "recent" discussions at the plenums of both the Ukrainian and all-USSR unions of writers and citing Shamota's article in Komunist Ukrainy [cf. A1358], the anonymous reviewer attacks I. Bilyk for his Mech Areia, I. Ilienko [Ilyenko} for his biography of H. Kvitka-Osnovianenko, V. Zaremba for his biography of Ivan Manzhura, as well as some unnamed lyric poets who, according to this article, indulge in "various pseudo- psychological musings" "on subjects that they quite frequently know very little about". The Digest's title" "Works dealing with Ukraine's past scored".

A499. "Ideological solidarity, fighting offensive. Meeting of Communist writers in Kiev." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.6 (June 1968): 8- 10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 May 1968): 2-4].

The meeting of communist writers of Kyiv was addressed by F.D. Ovcharenko, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine. Ovcharenko gave a summary of the April 1968 Plenum, of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. He spoke of the need to condemn "individual manifestations of political indifference", bourgeois- nationalist ideology, great power chauvinism and "deceptive Zionism". Singled out for special criticism were the Priashiv journal Dukla (for an article about Tychyna), the anthology Vitryla (published by Molod' in 1968), O. Honchar's novel Sobor and some "over- enthusiastic" reviews of it. The Digest supplied title of this article reads: "Writers- communists meet in Kiev. Express concern over recent developments."

A500. "If one raises the curtain." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.11 (November 1976): 19-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 September 1976: 2].

An article by V. Briukhovets'kyi [Bryukhovets'kyy], published on 27 July in Literaturna Ukraina provoked a number of readers to respond and give their views about the relationships between writers, their editor-reviewers and publishers. The Digest publishes excerpts of such letters written by Vasyl Marusyk, Anatoliy Lastovets'kyy and Oleksadr Zahorodniy. The Digest's title: "Fate of manuscripts in publishing houses discussed".

A501. "Ignatenko, Mikhail Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 212.

Bio-bibliographical data (19 lines) about the poet Mykhailo Ihnatenko, born 1919.

A502. "Ihor Kalynets sentenced." ABN Correspondence. 24.1 (January-February 1973): 29.

A brief news item about the sentencing in Lviv in November 1972 of the poet Ihor Kalynets' who was tried, according to this report, on the basis of Article 187-1 of the Criminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR.

A503. "Ihor Kalynets sentenced to nine years." ABN Correspondence. 24.2 (March-April 1973): 2. illus.

According to this news item, Ihor Kalynets' was tried in Lviv in November 1972 and was sentenced to nine years of imprisonment and three years of exile. Ihor's wife, Iryna Stasiv- Kalynets', was sentenced in July 1972 to six years of imprisonment and three years of exile. The news item is illustrated with a photo of Dzvinka Kalynets' - the couple's young daughter who is being cared for by relatives.

A504. "Ilarion". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 10 (1976): 132.

This note (19 lines + bibliography) characterizes Ilarion as "the first Russian metropolitan in Kiev" and says that his "Discourse on Law and Grace (written between 1037 and 1050) is one of the outstanding publicistic works of ancient Rus'..."

A505. "Il'chenko, Aleksandr Eliseevich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 10 (1976): 132.

Oleksandr Il'chenko (b.1909) is the author of short story collections and novels. (15 lines + biblio.)

A506. "Ilchenko, Aleksandr Yeliseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 213.

Thirty-three lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer and publicist Oleksandr Il'chenko, born 1909.

A507. Ilienko, Ivan. "A letter to the editor."/ Ivan Ilyenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.9 (September 1973): 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (3 August 1973): 3].

The Digest's title: "Biographer of Kvitka-Osnovyanenko defends his work." The author responds to S. Shankovs'kyy's article "Facts and conjectures" and to a review "Ideological integrity and passion in creativity" [cf. A498]. Ilienko accepts some, but not all of the criticism expressed by the reviewers.

A508. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "Anatomy of a literary scandal: Myxajl' Semenko and the origins of Ukrainian futurism." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.4 (December 1978): 467-499.

Ukrainian futurist movement of the 1920's, according to Ilnytzkyj, has been neglected by literary critics and misunderstood. "In contrast to Russian Futurism, which has a firm place in Russian literary history, founded on a respectable body of scholarship, Ukrainian Futurism remains unexamined from the historical, theoretical, or literary viewpoint, and... serious questions were and are raised about its place in the Ukrainian literary process." Ilnytzkyj's article examines in some detail the evolution of the poet Mykhail Semenko, the main proponent of Ukrainian futurism, and the scandal he created by denouncing in the forewords to his poetry collections Derzannia and Kvero-futuryzm the cult of Shevchenko and the 'national era' in art. "For Semenko, the question of art's modernity or quality loomed larger than the question of its social, national, or political function," says Ilnytzkyj, and that, in his view, was at the root of his conflict with the critics of Ukrains'ka khata and others. Quotations from Semenko's poetry in the article appear in the original Ukrainian, without translation.

A509. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "Antonych: intimations of mortality (A discussion concerning five poems)." / Oleh Ilnytzkyj. Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 1.1 (Fall 1976): 12-17.

Ilnytzkyj analyzes five poems by Bohdan Ihor Antonych which have in their title the word persten', i.e. the poems "Nash persten'", "Try persteni", "Elehiia pro persten' pisni", "Elehiia pro persten' molodosti" and "Elehiia pro persten' nochi". The ring in Antonych's poetry, says the author, "is an image of a closed circle, and symbolic of continuity, of an eternally repeated time-cycle." Antonych's poetic ego inhabits three worlds, according to Ilnytzkyj, "the world of the song, the world of youth, and the world of the night." While the "ring of youth is consistently used by Antonych to connote a chain of events that evoke innocence and happiness", the other two rings "consistently are associated with death and coldness". "Antonych's poetic ego vacillates between the innocence of youth and the culpability of adulthood", says Ilnytzkyj, "Innocence (youth) partakes of the fruit of knowledge (slovo, art) and in a paroxysm of pleasure and pain, dies..." Accordingly, art in Antonych's view, "is an act of sin, a tasting of the fruit of knowledge, that brings spiritual death." All poetry quotations in Ilnytzkyj's article are in the original Ukrainian.

A510. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "Mykola Bažan: his poetry and his critics (On the occasion of the poet's 70th birthday)." Recenzija. 5.2 (Spring- Summer 1975): 1-26.

Mykola Bazhan's 70th birthday on 9 October 1974 was widely celebrated in the USSR. Bazhan was given the "Hero of Socialist Labor" medal and a score of books and articles were published. Ilnytzkyj provides a critical survey of some of these publications, notes the avoidance of issues considered sensitive by Soviet critics (such as Bazhan's early involvement with the Futurists and with the VAPLITE), the absence in his collected works of such early works as "Sliptsi" (1930) and "Getto v Umani" (1929) and of his later poems gloryfying Stalin, as well as significant editorial changes of texts in the new editions. Says Ilnytzkyj in his conclusions: "... a host of questions on such subjects as Bažan's philosophy, his style, the influences he was subject to, have gone to a great degree untouched. The first decade of his creativity has been virtually ignored and the facts of his life in that period... shrouded in calculated obscurity and mystery. Although nearly half a century has passed since they were written, many of Bažan's early works continue to be unpublished." Instead of rectifying these faults on the occasion of Bazhan's jubilee, says Ilnytzkyj, Ukrainian scholarship has produced works which are either "clearly redundant" or of "dubious value".

A511. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "Mykola Bazhan: Six unknown poems." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 4.2 (Fall 1979): 20-22.

A critical note to accompany a re-publication of Bazhan's poems: "Rura-marsh", "Kryzhmo komuny", "Mene zelenykh nih", "Z povisty pro mistera Iuza i trampa Dzheka", "Osinnia put'", "Tsyrk". The poems appear in the original Ukrainian on pp.22-32. According to Ilnytzkyj, they were originally published in 1923-1927 and never republished in the Soviet Union, either because they were written "in the Futurist vein" or were "out of step with Soviet reality."

A512. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "The origins of Ukrainian futurism." / Oleh Ilnytzkyj. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1978-1979. 9 (1978-1979): 37-39. Biblio.

A summary of a paper presented on 7 December 1978 by Oleh Ilnytzkyj, Ph.D. candidate in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University and of the discussion that followed. The speaker analyzed the ideological differences between Mykhail Semenko, the founder of Ukrainian futurism, and the modernists of the journal Ukrains'ka khata and the reasons behind the disregard and criticism of Ukrainian futurism by critics and literary scholars.

A513. Ilnytzkyj, Oleh S. "The unaesthetic images of Mykola Bažan." / Oleh Ilnytzkyj. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. No.4 (1973-1974): 10-11. Biblio.

A summary of the paper presented on 18 October 1973 [date given erroneously as 1974] by Oleh Ilnytzkyj, a M.A. candidate in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed the "numerous and obsessive imagery connected with the body" in Bazhan's poems written in 1927-1932, some of which have been criticised by Soviet critics for their "naturalism".

A514. "Imperative demand". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.6 (June 1969): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 April 1969): 1].

The Digest's title: "Crimean writers rebuked for ideological neutrality". A news report about a party meeting of writers of the Crimea, with an address by O. Malin, in which, among other things, he criticized the tendency of some writers to attempt a "role of neutral observer" and made in this connection a number of critical observations about the poetry of Dmytro Shupta and Anatolii Miliavs'kyi [Anatoliy Milyavs'kyy].

A515. "Important historical subjects." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.6 (June 1975): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 April 1975): 2].

A report about writers' appearances at various workers' collectives, i.e. before groups of construction workers, transport workers, subway builders, etc. The writers who were presented to these audiences, read from their works and answered questions from the audience, were, according to this report, Mykola Oliinyk (Oliynyk), O. Syzonenko and I. Drach. The Digest's title: "Kiev writers meet with workers".

A516. "Impressions on a visit to Canada". An interview with Olexandr Pidsukha. Ukrainian Canadian. 27.572 (65) (September 1974): 12-13. port.

Unsigned. The writer Oleksandr Pidsukha, who was at the time the chairman of Ukraina Society in Kyiv, visited Canada with his wife from 15 June to 13 July 1974. This was his second visit to Canada (the first was in 1962). He was invited to participate in the opening of Ukrainian Heritage Village in Alberta, visited also Ottawa, Toronto, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Windsor and Montreal.

A517. "In commemoration of Taras Shevchenko's birthday." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 202.

A note in "Ukrainica in American and foreign periodicals" about a statement by Edward J. Derwinski, a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives, published in the Congressional Record on 8 March 1979. Derwinski, according to this note, was "a sponsor of the resolution that led to the erection of the Shevchenko statue in Washington, D.C."

A518. "In defence of V. Moroz." ABN Correspondence. 26.1 (January-February 1975): 35.

About a letter of 44 Columbia University scholars addressed to the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet asking for a review of the Valentyn Moroz case.

A519. "In defence of Valentyn Moroz." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.1 (Spring 1975): 23-44.

A collection of statements, letters, appeals, news reports from a variety of sources that relate to the imprisonment and treatment of Valentyn Moroz, his hunger strike, etc. Contents: Father's plea: Valentyn Moroz's father petitions Brezhnev / Yakiv Moroz. Wife's plea to the world / Raisa Moroz. Sakharov confirms: Moroz on the verge of death. Western correspondents report from Moscow: Ukraine's fighters for human and national rights rally 'round historian's hunger strike / Michael Parks. Ukrainians in the West ask President Ford for intervention. Western press responses and reports: Soviet dissident on verge of death, physicist reveals / Ted Blachar (Toronto Star, 8 November 1974). Soviet dissident dying in prison, wife tells MP (Toronto Star, 11 November 1974). Hunger strike leading to death, wife says (Globe and Mail, 11 November 1974). Moroz's wife tells Trudeau of husband's death sentence (Toronto Sun, 5 December 1974). True Davidson (Times, 12 February 1975). Mr. Wilson's Moscow visit & V. Moroz (Times, 12 February 1975). A letter to Valentyn Moroz from the President of Harvard University. National leaders intervene: House of Commons, Ottawa, Canada, 12 November 1974: Confinement of Valentyn Moroz by Russians - Government action to determine health condition. Boston City Council demands freedom for Moroz and others. Congressman Moakley to act on Moroz resolutions. Moroz-Bukovsky Day for late March.

A520. "In honor of Ivan Franko." Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 23.6 (June 1966): 19.

This unsigned article published on the occasion of Franko's 50th death anniversary stresses Franko's "tremendous influence on the social consciousness of his time" and on "the raising of women's social status" and his editorial help to Natalia Kobryns'ka and Olena Pchilka in the publication of the first Ukrainian women's almanach in 1887.

A521. "In memoriam: Prof. Roman Smal-Stocki." Forum. 8 (Spring 1969): 29. port.

An unsigned obituary for the Slavic scholar who died in Washington on 27 April 1969, with his portrait.

A522. "In memory of Andrei Malyshko." Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (1973): 163.

A brief unsigned note about a museum dedicated to the poet Andrii Malyshko in a room of the school bearing his name in his native village of Obukhovo, Kyiv region.

A523. "In spiritual emigration". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.10 (October 1969): 24-26. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Molod' Ukrainy (10 September 1969): 2].

A "letter of indignation" "over the unworthy behaviour of I. Dzyuba" signed by the writers B. Chalyi [Chalyy], Ia. Iarmysh [Ya. Yarmysh] and the journalists L. Stefanovych, V. Prokopenko, L. Hubaryeva, V. Konyukh, V. Maryanyn, B. Mashtalyarchuk and V. Melnyk. The writers express solidarity with L. Dmyterko's article "Position in battle" [cf. A235] and say: "... when a person is praised by his enemies, he is doing something wrong. Obviously I. Dzyuba is aware of this truism. However, he remains silent." Digest's title: "New vituperative attack launched against Dzyuba".

A524. "In the Commission on Culture of the Supreme Soviet of the Ukrainian SSR." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.12 (December 1974): 15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (26 October 1974): 1].

The Digest's title: "Commission on culture considers problems in book trade". According to this news item, the Commission met on 25 October. Reports were presented by H.M. Shabliy (deputy chairman of the Ukrainian SSR Council of Ministers, State Committee for Publishing, Polygraphy and Book Trade Affairs) and L.K. Solomakha (first deputy chairman of the Ukrainian Cooperative Union's executive board). According to this article, Ukraine has a total of 1081 book stores and 803 book stands in cities, 2250 stores and 1029 kiosks in rural localities and more than 400 bookmobiles. It was noted at the meeting, that some large population settlements are not properly served, that reader demand is not properly studied, that some publishing houses "do not always fill the orders submitted for books of mass demand and sometimes even withdraw books that have been ordered from their publishing plans..."

A525. "In the Executive Board of the Kiev Organization of the Ukrainian Writers' Union." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.12 (December 1972): 11-12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 October 1972): 1].

Digest's title: "V. Zakharchenko expelled from Writers' Union". A report on a recent meeting chaired by Iurii Zbanats'kyi. I. Tsiupa [Tsyupa] spoke about plans for prose writers, M. Nahnybida reported on behalf of poets. Iu. Zbanats'kyi expressed the view that creative association of prose writers "should have examined I. Bilyk's historical novel Mech Areaia (The Sword of Ares) while [it was] still in manuscript form." The Executive Board "pointed out serious errors of an ideo-artistic nature in the novel." "V.I. Zakharchenko was expelled from the Union for his antisocial behavior."

A526. "In the great tradition." Ukrainian Canadian. 27.574 (67) (November 1974): 41.

An unsigned note about what is called "unity of patriotism and internationalism" with poetry translations by John Weir. Includes eight 4-line stanzas of Maksym Ryl's'kyi's poem "Songs (When'er my country's songs are rendered)".

A527. "In the Leninist manner." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.1 (January 1970): 7-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (21 November 1969): 1-2].

About a meeting of the party committee of the Kyiv writers' organization. The journals Vitchyzna, Dnipro, Literaturna Ukraina were criticized for publishing "ideologically obscure works, questionable poetic and prose selections, subjective and erroneous critical articles which often distort the literary process" (Vitchyzna), not setting the proper tone "in portraying the heroic present of our Soviet youth" (Dnipro), lack of "ideological clarity and party spirit, negligence in "reflecting and directing the literary process in Ukraine" (Literaturna Ukraina). Ia. Bash was elected secretary of the party committee. The title supplied by the Digest: "Literary publications scored for lack of political vigilance."

A528. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.11 (November 1971): 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 October 1971): 1].

Report of a meeting of the Executive Board under the chaimanship of Iurii Smolych. Smolych presented a list of writers who have been awarded state prizes "for their services in the development of Soviet literature and their active participation in the communist education of workers". P. Panch and Iu. Shovkoplias received the Order of Lenin; M. Bazhan, O. Honchar, Iu. Zbanats'kyi, V. Kozachenko, O. Korniichuk, O. Levada, I. Muratov, M. Rybalko, M. Stel'makh and M. Shamota received the Order of the October Revolution. 28 other writers received lesser awards. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian writers receive awards".

A529. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.12 (December 1972): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (24 October 1972): 1].

A report about a meeting held "last Thursday", with Iu. Zbanats'kyi presiding. There was a discussion about a bureau for the promotion of literary works. P. Avtomonov, P. Panch, I. Soldatenko, D. Pavlychko, L. Novychenko and S. Oliinyk took part. The Presidium approved the expulsion of V. Zakharchenko from the Writers' Union, as well as a new editorial board for Literaturna Ukraina (with I. Zub, as editor-in-chief) and for the journal Zhovten' (with R. Fedoriv as editor). The Digest's title: "Editorial boards of Literaturna Ukraina and Zhovten' approved."

A530. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.6 (June 1974): 10-11. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 May 1974)].

The Digest's title: "UWU [sic] presidium censures 'Raduga'. Accepts new members." At a joint meeting of the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine and the party committee of the Kyiv writers' organization, chaired by V. Kozachenko, according to this news report, the work of the Russian language literary journal Raduga was criticized for publishing "ideologically and artistically weak works". Eight new members were admitted to the Writers' Union.

A531. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.8 (August 1974): 27- 28. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (31 May 1974): 3].

About the meeting held on 28 May, with Vasyl' Kozachenko presiding. Thirteen new members were accepted to the Writers' Union.

A532. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.11 (November 1974): 16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (27 September 1974): 1].

Digest's title: "Writers' Union Presidium meets". According to this news item, the meeting was held "last Tuesday", with Kozachenko presiding. He reported on the results of the plenum of the executive board of Writers' Union of the USSR. The meeting approved a plan of activities, the editorial board for the journal Raduga (with Iu. Iarmysh [Yuriy Yarmysh] as editor-in-chief), as well as a commission (headed by Iu. Smolych) in charge of commemorating the 70th anniversary of the birth of Mykola Bazhan.

A533. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.7 (July 1975): 15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (30 May 1975): 1].

The Digest's title: "Writers' Union Board meets, approves new editorial boards." At the meeting, V. Kozachenko presented the program of Days of Byelorussian Literature and Art to be held in Ukraine 18-27 June 1975. A. Katsnel'son reported on the results of the All-Union conference of young writers. V.M. Vynohrads'kyi (Vynohradskyy) was approved as editor-in- chief of Literaturna Ukraina, L. Dmyterko as editor-in-chief of Vitchyzna, A. Kravchenko as editor-in-chief of Donbas.

A534. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.1 (January 1977): 20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (16 November 1976): 1-2].

A report on an expanded meeting that took place on 11 November 1976, with V.P. Kozachenko presiding. Full support was expressed for "the positions and objectives put forward in the CC CPSU resolution 'On work with creative youth'." A new board for the commission on work with young authors was approved, consisting of O.S. Levada as chairman, B.S. Buryak, A.I. Katsnelson and M.I. Karpenko as members. Ten new members were admitted to the Union of Writers of Ukraine. The Digest's title: "UWU Executive Board meets, accepts new members."

A535. "In the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Unkrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 7-8. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 February 1975): 1].

According to this news item, a regular meeting was held "last Tuesday", with Kozachenko presiding. Thematic plan for 1976 of the Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house presented by A. Stas' was discussed and approved. L. Novychenko reported on the work of the committee on criticism and literary theory. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Writers' Union Presidium meets. Novychenko reports on work of criticism commission".

A536 . "In the Presidium of the Ukrainian Writers' Union." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.2 (February 1972): 6-7. [Full text. Ukrainian opriginal in Literaturna Ukraina (28 December 1971): 1].

About a recent meeting ("last Thursday"), with Iurii Smolych presiding. Membership in the following commissions was approved: Commission on criticism (L. Novychenko, chairman), Commission on the work with young authors (V. Buriak [Buryak], chairman); Council of the republican Writers' Building (Yu. Martych, chairman) and various jubilee commissions to honor Y. Halan, V. Mynko and M. Khazan. Kozachenko reported on the Days of Soviet Literatures in the Voroshylovhrad oblast (held 14-20 December 1971), where , he said, nearly 50,000 readers attended some 96 meetings and literary evenings. The Digest's title: "Writers Union Presidium appoints commissions."

A537. "In the Presidium of the Ukrainian Writers' Union." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.1 (January 1974): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 December 1973): 3].

Digest's title: "Writers' Union Presidium approves new members". According to this news item, the meeting of the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Writers Union of Ukraine was held on 7 December under V. Kozachenko's chairmanship. A program of activities was approved for the first half of 1974. Seven new members were admitted to the Writers' Union.

A538. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.6 (June 1968): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1968): 1].

The meeting of the presidium took place on 11 April 1968 and was chaired by M. Zarudnyi [Zarudnyy]. Under discussion were preparations for the Lenin centennial jubilee, as well as the approval of editorial boards of the almanac Suziria and the journal Zhovten'. The Digest's title: "Writers' union board holds business meeting."

A539. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.2 (February 1970): 1-3. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (6 January 1970): 3].

About a meeting of the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine devoted in its entirety to the so called "Dzyuba question". No precise date of the meeting is given in this report. Iurii Zbanats'kyi presided at the meeting, V. Kozachenko, the head of the executive board of the Kyiv writers' organization that passed a resolution "to expel I. Dzyuba from membership in the Writers' Union", presented a report. Ivan Dziuba was present and read a statement in which he disassociated himself from those who interpret his works "in the spirit of anti-Soviet propaganda". Said Dziuba: "... as a Soviet writer I have always maintained my civic posture, which has nothing in common either with the ideology of Ukrainian bourgeois nationalism or with any ideas of inter-nation enmity and hatred of mankind." Dziuba's statement has a date: 26 December 1969. Participating in the discussion about what was called Dziuba's "serious ideological errors" were the following writers: Iu. Zbanats'kyi, P. Usenko, Iu. Smolych, L. Novychenko, D. Pavlychko, B. Chalyi [Chalyy], A. Holovko, Ia. Bash, I. Drach, B. Oliinyk [Oliynyk], P. Panch, D. Tkach, I. Tsiupa [Tsyupa], P. Zahrebel'nyi, A. Moroz, V. Sobko, M. Zarudnyi [Zarudnyy], V. Korotych and Iu. Mushketyk. The resolution of the meeting reads: "Taking into consideration the fact that I. Dzyuba expressed his protest against the exploitation of his writings by enemy ideologists for their anti-Soviet propaganda, that he regrets that some of his manuscripts found their way abroad into the dishonest hands of various falsifiers, and that he stated that he will abide by the writers' organization statutory requirements and together with all other writers will work for the further flowering of the Ukrainian Soviet literature, the Presidium considers it possible to allow I. Dzyuba to remain a member of the Union of Writers." The text of this report translated from the Literaturna Ukraina is published by the Digest under the heading: "Presidium of Writers Union of Ukraine censures Dzyuba. Dzyuba asserts his views, denounces allegations he is a nationalist."

A540. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 4. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1971): 1].

The Digest's title: "Kozachenko outlines party congress directives for writers".

A report on the meeting of the presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine that took place on 13 April with Iurii Zbanats'kyi presiding. Kozachenko spoke about the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and the new ideological guides for writers. Anatolii Moroz reported on the publishing plans of Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house. Dmytro Bilous spoke about the seminar for young writers to be held in Irpin' from 15 to 28 April.

A541. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.1 (January 1972): 13-14. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (26 November 1971): 2].

About a meeting that took place "last Tuesday", with Iurii Smolych presiding. On the agenda: a report by Pavlo Avtomonov, director of the Writers' Union bureau of propaganda of literature, who spoke about the preparations for Days of Fraternal Literatures (of the nationalities within the USSR); a discussion of the works submitted for various prizes (no authors or titles mentioned); approval of the composition of various commissions, of six new members of the Writers' Union and of O. Mykytenko's appointment to the post of deputy editor of Vsesvit. The Digest's title: "Writers' Union Presidium meets."

A542. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 29. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 May 1973): 3].

About a regular meeting (no date given) of the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union. On the agenda: a report of the Copyright Administration director B. Burkatov about the signing by the USSR of the Geneva Copyright Convention; the confirmation of a new editorial board for Vsesvit (with D. Pavlychko as editor-in-chief); and a decision to expel O. Berdnyk from the Union of Writers of Ukraine for his "antisocial acts and deviation from the principles and tasks outlined in the USSR Writers' Union Charter." The Digest's title: "Writers' Union Presidium expels Oles' Berdnyk, admits new members".

A543. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 30. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 June 1973): 2].

Report on the meeting held on 12th of June with V. Kozachenko presiding. The Presidium approved the composition of commission on dramaturgy, the theater, motion pictures and television (O. Kolomiyets, chair) and of a newly established commission on journalism and literary sketches (V. Rechmedin, chairman). Twelve new members were admitted to the Union of Writers of Ukraine, among them also those writing in Russian, Yiddish and Hungarian. [The Digest's title as in A542].

A544. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. The inspiration and passion of a Soviet artist." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.3 (March 1973): 7-8. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (2 February 1973): 1].

The Digest's title "Writers' Union Presidium discusses tasks of literature in light of Brezhnev's report". The meeting of the Presidium of the Excutive Board took place on 25th of January. Topics under discussion included calls to raise the level of ideo-educational work, to direct the youth to the study of party documents, to "intensify the sense of international obligations of Soviet literature" and to oppose "national limitedness" and "political indifference".

A545. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.4 (April 1972): 10. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (3 March 1972): 1].

In preparation for the next Plenum, the meeting of the Presidium was called for 2 March 1972. The meeting was addressed by Ivan Dziuba. Dziuba's case was discussed by M. Bazhan, O. Bandura, P. Voron'ko, L. Dmyterko, P. Zahrebel'nyi, Iu. Zbanats'kyi, V. Kozachenko, I. Le, L. Novychenko, D. Pavlychko, N. Rybak and V. Sobko. The Presidium's resolution, approved unanimously, said: "I.M. Dzyuba was expelled from the membership of the Union of Writers of Ukraine for gross violation of the principles and requirements of the Statute of the Union of Writers, preparation and dissemination of materials of an anti-Soviet and anti-communist nature, which express nationalist views, slander the Soviet regime and the Party's nationalities policy, and are actively exploited by our class enemies in the struggle against the Communist Party and the Soviet state." The Digest's title: "Ivan Dzyuba expelled from the Writers' Union."

A546. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.8 (August 1972): 11-12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 June 1972): 3; (30 June 1972): 1].

Reports on two meetings of the presidium of the executive board of Union of Writers of Ukraine held on June 16th and June 27th, with Iurii Smolych presiding in both. The meeting on 16 June confirmed the 39-member executive board for Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house; jubilee commissions were formed to commemorate the 80th anniversary of Mykola Kulish, the 90th anniversary of Yanka Kupala, and the 80th birthday of Vasyl' Ellan-Blakytnyi; editorial boards were named for the journals Donbas, Vitchyzna, Prapor, Raduga; The Cherkasy oblast writers were recognized as the 17th oblast organization of the Writers Union; new members were admitted to the Union. The second meeting dealt primarily with the literary heritage of the recently deceased playwright O. Korniichuk and took action to expel from the Union of Writers of Ukraine Viktor Ivanysenko "for antisocial behavior" and "activities incompatible with the calling of Soviet writer."

A547. "In the Presidium of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.2 (February 1975): 14-15. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 December 1974): 1,3].

The Presidium of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union, according to this news item, met on 10 December, with V. Kozachenko presiding. Membership of what is called here "creative commissions" was approved. The Commission on the work with young authors is to be headed by B. Buriak [Buryak], the Commission on literary translation - by V. Korotych, the new editorial board for the quarterly Poeziia - by B. Stepaniuk [Stepanyuk] as editor-compiler. Fourteen new members were admitted to the Writers' Union. The Digest's title reads: "Writers' Union appoints commissions, accepts new members."

A548. "In the Presidium of the Writers' Union of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.11 (November 1973): 16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 October 1973): 2].

About a recent meeting of the Presidium chaired by Oleksandr Levada. Under discussion: a ten-day festival of Armenian literature in Ukraine; appointments of A. Khorunzhyi as editor of Literaturna Ukraina, of Nadiia Cherchenko as editor of Prapor and admittance of ten new members to the Writers' Union.

The Digest's title: "Appoint new editor of Literaturna Ukraina. Accept new members to Writers' Union."

A549. "In the Presidium of Ukrainian Writers' Union." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.6 (June 1975): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 April 1975): 1].

The Digest title reads: "Writers' Union Presidium hears reports, accepts new members." The meeting took place on 11 April, with V. Kozachenko presiding. Among the topics discussed were preparations for the 30rd anniversary of the victory in 1945, the party directives on the work with the literary youth, preparations for the days of Belorussian literature and art in Ukraine. Eleven new members were admitted to the Writers's Union.

A550. "In the Secretariat of Ukraine's Union of Writers' Executive Board." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.2 (February 1969): 21-22. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (31 December 1968): 2].

About the meeting of the executive board held at the end of December 1968 and chaired by Oles' Honchar. A new division of duties was approved and heads of various committees were appointed, among them O. Honchar, V. Kozachenko, P. Zahrebel'nyi, Iu. Zbanats'kyi, M. Zarudnyi, D. Pavlychko, P. Panch, L. Novychenko, V. Korotych. Also approved were preparations to mark the 20th anniversary of the death of Iaroslav Halan.

A551. "In tribute to Olena Teliha." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 28.2 (321) (February 1977): 23.

Biographical extracts abridged and translated by B.Arnaudon from the book Prapory dukha: zhyttia i tvorchist' Oleny Telihy, edited by Oleh Zhdanovych [n.p.: 1947. 178 p. illus.]

A552. "Index index: Soviet Union". Index on Censorship. 1.1 (Spring 1972): 87.

"Index index", a regular feature in the Index on Censorship, is described in this first issue as the "quarterly chronicle of events around the world illustrating the various ways in which freedom of expression is being limited or denied". This first issue contains data about the imprisonment of Valentyn Moroz, the arrests of Ivan Svitlychnyi, Viacheslav Chornovil, Vasyl' Stus, Mykhailo Osadchyi, Hryhorii Chubai, Hryhorii Kochur, Iryna Stasiv-Kalynets' and others and about the expulsion from the Ukrainian Writers' Union of Ivan Dziuba.

A553. "Index index: Soviet Union". Index on Censorship. 1.3-4 (Autumn-Winter 1972): 120, 121, 122.

Notes about the search of Oles' Berdnyk's apartment in April 1972 and of the arrests, among others, of the writers Ihor Kalynets', Ivan Dziuba, Zynoviia Franko, Mykola Kholodnyi, Danylo Shumuk, Anatolii Lupynis, Nadiia Svitlychna.

A554. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 2.1 (Spring 1973): x, xi.

Notes about the sentencing of I. Kalynets' and V. Stus, the release of H. Chubai, the new trial of Z. Krasivs'kyi, the removal from publication plans of a book by B. Antonenko-Davydovych, the expulsion from the Writers' Union of Ukraine of V. Zakharchenko, the publication in Paris of issue 6 of the samizdat journal Ukrains'kyi visnyk ["Ukrainian Herald"] and the appeal of Iu. Zbanats'kyi for the Writers' Union "to exercise preliminary censorship" to prevent books such as Mech Areia by I. Bilyk to be "negligently admitted into print".

A555. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 2.2 (Summer 1973): x.

Notes about the sentencing of V. Chornovil, I. Dziuba, I. Svitlychnyi, Ie. Sversiuk.

A556. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 2.3 (Autumn 1973): ix, x.

Notes about the sentencing of Ivan Svitlychnyi, Ie. Sverstiuk, I. Dziuba and about attacks in the press on O. Berdnyk and his expulsion from the Writers' Union.

A557. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 2.4 (Winter 1973): p.ix.

Notes about the transfer to a prison psychiatric hospital of Zynovii Krasivs'kyi and about repeated interrogations by the KGB of Mykola Lukash and his dismissal from the editorial board of Vsesvit.

A558. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 3.1 (Spring 1974): x, xi.

News items about the pardoning and release from prison of I. Dziuba, about the transfer of V. Chornovil to Vladimir prison in Russia, and about the pressures on the imprisoned I. Svitlychnyi to recant his views.

A559. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 3.2 (Summer 1974): xii.

News about the expulsion from the Writers' Union of Ukraine of B. Chichibabin and V. Borovyi, about the vicious treatment in the Vladimir prison of V. Moroz, and about the cancellation of planned publications by V. Symonenko and L. Kostenko.

A560. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 3.3 (Autumn 1974): xv, xvi.

News items about hunger strikes of the imprisoned V. Moroz and V. Chornovil, bans on Shevchenko celebrations in Kyiv and Lviv, and the removal of pre-revolutionary books from Lviv university library holdings.

A561. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 3.4 (Winter 1974): vii.

News items about the expulsion from the Writers' Union of M. Lukash and H. Kochur and of the racantation by Viktor Korzh of a speech he made at the 5th Writers' Congress of Ukraine.

A562. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 4.1 (Spring 1975): 92.

News items about V. Moroz, currently on hunger strike in the Vladimir prison in Moscow and about Zinovia Franko's articles published in Literaturna Ukraina and Radians'ka osvita calling on Moroz to "re-evaluate his convictions".

A563. "Index index: Soviet Union." 4.2 (Summer 1975): 95.

A brief note about the samizdat journal Ukrains'kyi visnyk [Ukrainian Herald], the Spring 1974 (no.7-8) issue having recently reached the West with its reports of arrests of Ukrainian intellectuals, illegal searches, confiscation of samizdat publications, dismissals from academic establishments, expulsion of students from institutions of higher education - all of which took place in the January-March 1972 period.

A564. "Index index: Soviet Union." 4.3 (Autumn 1975): 88, 89-90.

News items about the arrest of Mykola Rudenko on 18 April; about the end of V. Moroz's hunger strike; about the reaffirmation by Ivan Dziuba of his recantation of the views expressed in his book Internationalism or Russification.

A565. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 4.4 (Winter 1975): 78.

Brief notes about the return to camps in Russia from Kyiv and Lviv prisons of V. Chornovil, I. Svitlychnyi and M. Osadchyi.

A566. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 5.2 (Summer 1976): 88.

Brief notes conveying the following data: 1/ Leonid Pliushch, released from Dnipropetrovsk special psychiatric hospital on 8 January 1976 and allowed to leave the USSR, spoke about terrible conditions for inmates in that prison hospital and singled out the poet Anatolii Lupynis, one of the current inmates in need of help. 2/ Vasyl Stus was transferred from Perm labor camp to Kyiv. According to this note: "The text of the judgement passed at his trial has now become available in the West. It lists in detail the poems, articles and letters - his own and by other authors - for the possession and partly circulation of which he was imprisoned."

A567. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 5.3 (Autumn 1976): 84, 85.

Among the news items included: Ihor Kalynets "was taken from the Perm Camp to the Lviv KGB prison in February in an effort to induce him to recant. This having failed, he was returned to Perm in April." Valentyn Moroz after having served six year term in Vladimir prison, was transferred to the Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry in Moscow.

A568. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 6.1 (January-February 1977): 63-64.

News items about Valentyn Moroz (who was declared sane at the Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry in Moscow) and about pressures by prison authorities against the Ukrainian language used by political prisoners.

A569. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 6.3 (May-June 1977): 71-72.

Among the news reported: transfer of Vasyl' Stus to Mordovian labor colony no.19; confiscation by prison authorities of 300 of Stus's poetry translations from Goethe, Rilke, Kipling and destruction of 600 of his poems; establishment in Kyiv of a group to monitor Soviet observance of Basket Three of the Helsinki Final Act, headed by Mykola Rudenko; arrest of M. Rudenko on 5 February.

A570. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 6.5 (September-October 1977): 70, 71.

News about the arrest of Oles' Berdnyk and the trial of Mykola Rudenko and Oleksa Tykhyi [Oleg Tikhy in text].

A571. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 6.6 (November-December 1977): 68.

Among the news reported: Helii Sniehir'ov's renunciation of Soviet citizenship and his recent completion of a samizdat work entitled "Nenko, moia nenko" which deals with "the destruction of cultural and public life" in Ukraine at the end of the 1920's; trial of Mykola Rudenko and Oleksa Tykhyi in Druzhkivka, near Donetsk: charged with "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda", they were sentenced - Rudenko to seven years imprisonment and five years of exile, Tykhyi to ten years imprisonment and five years of exile.

A572. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 7.2 (March-April 1978): 63.

News item about the rejection (on 15 September 1977) of an appeal to the Supreme Court of Ukrainian SSR of Mykola Rudenko and Oleksa Tykhyi.

A573. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 7.4 (July-August 1978): 71.

News item about "an alleged recantation" by Helii Sniehir'ov [Elie Snegirov in text] published in Radians'ka Ukraina. According to this report, "The writer, who has become paralyzed from the waist down since his arrest and interrogation last September, claims that he signed a letter asking to be transferred to hospital, but not the text that appeared in the press."

A574. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 7.5 (September-October 1978): 71.

According to this news item, political prisoners V. Moroz and Ie. Sverstiuk went on a hunger strike to protest the refusal of camp authorities to allow them family visits.

A575. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 8.2 (March-April 1979): 69-70.

Among the news items: a report of the death in a Kyiv prison hospital on 28 December of Helii Sniehir'ov (Elie Snegiryov in text).

A576. "Index index: Soviet Union." Index on Censorship. 8.4 (July-August 1979): 69.

News about Ievhen Sverstiuk working as a carpenter in his exile in the Buriat ASSR, and M. Osadchyi working as a stoker in his exile in Komi ASSR.

A577. "Index index: Soviet Union." 8.5 (September-October 1979): 71.

Arrests of Oles Berdnyk and Iurii Badzio reported among other news items.

A578. Ingham, Norman. "The hagiographical traditions of the Kievans SS. Boris and Gleb." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1970-1971. 1 (1970-1971): 66-68. Biblio.

Summary of the seminar held on May 4, 1971. The speaker, professor of Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University, called attention to the continuity between the hagiographical traditions of the 10th century Czech martyred rulers-saints Wenčeslas and Ludmila and the Kyivan 11th century saints Borys and Hlib, a continuity which - in the speaker's view - is not sufficiently recognized in scholarship. A discussion followed the presentation.

A579. Ingham, Norman W. "The Sovereign as martyr, East and West." Slavic and East European Journal. 17.1 (Spring 1973): 1-17. Notes.

"...Boris and Gleb's sainthood and the literary writings that formed around them, " says Ingham, "cannot be understood without reference to the cult of the earlier Czech saints Princess Ludmila (d.ca.921) and her grandson Prince Wenceslas (Václav, Vjačeslav, d.929). The hagiography of these four Slavic martyrs is closely interrelated and constitutes in effect a single tradition which originated in tenth-century Bohemia and soon travelled to Rus', where it evolved along its own lines."

A580. "Inspiration devoted to the Party and the people. Joint jubilee plenum of Creative Unions and organizations of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.1 (January 1968): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (13 December 1967): 1-3].

According to this report, the plenum was called to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Soviet Ukraine. O. Honchar presided, P. Panch and L. Novychenko delivered official speeches. Both speakers mentioned "Ukrainian bourgeois-nationalists across the ocean", their "impotent malice" and their "obstreperous gathering" - these references being in connection with the World Congress of Free Ukrainians which took place in Washington in November 1967. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "At jubilee meet brickbats sent across the ocean".

A581. "The inspired bards of the Soviet age. A joint plenum of the creative unions and societies of Ukraine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the formation of the USSR." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.11 (November 1972): 1-2. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 September 1972): 1].

The Digest's title: "Ukraine's artists and writers report." At head of title: Joint Plenum of Ukrainian creative unions and societies. The Plenum was addressed by representatives of writers, artists, cinematographers, composers, journalists, actors and architects. For the opening address by M.P. Bazhan see A054, for the address on behalf of Ukrainian writers by Iu. Smolych see A1432.

A582. "An interview with political prisoners in Perm Camp No.35." Survey. 21.4 (97) (Autumn 1975): 195-216.

An interview conducted through an anonymous interviewer with several Soviet political prisoners, among them two Ukrainian writers: Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ihor Kalynets'. They answer questions about the isolation of prisoners, the methods of and the reasons for its implementation. Svitlychnyi in his answers describes the limitations placed on contacts with closest relatives - on their annual meetings, incoming and outgoing mail. Kalynets' talks about isolation as a means "to cover up the facts and the reality which violate international law and moral standards". "I was tried solely for my literary output, never having harboured any anti-Soviet inclinations, nor possessing to a greater or lesser degree a tangible socio-political temperament", says Kalynets'. Svitlychnyi discusses also hunger strikes. He considers them less effective as a means of informing the world at large, but effective for other reasons. "It is only during a hunger strike, or immediately after it, that representatives of higher bodies visit the camp and request an explanation of conditions in the camp", says Svitlychnyi.

A583. "Irchan, Miroslav (pseud. of Andrei Dmitrievich Babiuk)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 10 (1976): 416.

Myroslav Irchan (1897-1937) was the author of stories, plays, sketches and political pamphlets. "In his plays he portrayed the revolutionary struggle of the working people of Galicia, unmasking nationalists..." says GSE. (23 lines + biblio.)

A584. "Irchan, Miroslav (real name: Andrey Dmitriyevich Babyuk)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 237.

Twenty-four lines of bio-bibliographical data about Myroslav Irchan (b.14 July 1897, d. in prison in 1937).

A585. "Iryna Senyk sentenced anew." ABN Correspondence. 24.4 (July-August 1973): 5-6. illus., port.

The poet and dissident Iryna Senyk was sentenced to 6 years of imprisonment and 5 years of exile at a recent trial in Ivano-Frankivsk, according to this news article. No exact date of the trial is given.

A586. "Iryna Senyk sentenced for second time." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.3 (Autumn 1973): 335.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events". Iryna Senyk, says the note, was tried in March 1973 in Ivano-Frankivsk and was sentenced to six years of imprisonment and five years of exile.

A587. "Iryna Senyk, Vasyl Stus in solitary confinement. Rudenko's life imperiled." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.1 (Spring 1977): 110-111.

A note in the "Chronicle of current events" giving some recent news smuggled out to the West about three Ukrainian writers - currently political prisoners in the USSR.

A588. "Iryna Stasiv-Kalynets and Ihor Kalynets, Ukrainian writers sentenced to long terms." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 24.9/10 (285/286) (September/October 1973): 29-30.

This unsigned article provides some biographical data about the poets Ihor Kalynets' and his wife Iryna Kalynets and about the 1972 sentences handed down by a Soviet court: Ihor was sentenced to 9 years of imprisonment and 3 years of exile, Iryna to 6 years at a general regime labor camp and 3 years of exile.

A589. Isayevych, Yaroslav. "Attention to translations into foreign languages." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.6 (June 1972): 8-9. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 May 1972): 2].

The author calls attention to the unsatisfactory quality of translations from Ukrainian into foreign languages and to the unfortunate oversights in literary translations published by the Progress Publishing House in Moscow - incorrect translation of street names from Ukrainian into English, errors, dostortions, etc. The examples cited by Isayevych are Stories of the Soviet Ukraine, Boa Constrictor by Ivan Franko and the Lviv publication of Wooden Architectural Monuments of Transcarpathia by Hryhoriy Semenov.

A590. Isenberg, M. "The Song of Igor's Campaign: a poetic interpretation." / M. Isenberg, T. Riha. Canadian Slavic Studies. 1.1 (Spring 1967): 105- 112.

Contrary to the views of Marx, who, according to the authors, considered Slovo o polku Ihorevim "a summons to the Russian princes to unite on the very eve of the Mongol invasion", and contrary to the views of Gudzii, who claimed that Slovo's author wanted "his civic loyalty to be of service to the interests of his native land", the authors present an opposing poetic interpretation of Slovo. In their view, Slovo's author "wished to sing a praise of Igor" but the times demanded "an indirect and oblique manner of presentation, full of digressions and artful transitions. The Russian land is overcome by princely discords and feuds, the cause of all Russia's woes. One must be bitter, one must be melancholy, if one is to praise any prince at all, especially a prince like Igor, who is a prime example of the cause of all these discords. But, then, such are the political realities of Kievan Rus. One must still praise heroes." The authors consider Slovo "a fitting monument to poetic truth". The article is interspersed with some quotations from the poem in Nabokov's "literal rendering" (Vintage Books, 1960).

A591. "Ishchuk, Arseniy Alekseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 220.

Twenty-five lines of bio-bibliographical data about Arsenii Ishchuk, writer and literary critic, born 1908.

A592. Iurchuk, M. "In the face of reality." / M. Yurchuk, F. Lebedenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.6 (June 1968): 12-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (26 April 1968): 3-4].

A review article of O. Honchar's novel Sobor. The authors attack critically not only Honchar himself and his novel, but also the literary critics who failed to point out the "ideological and artistic mistakes of the author" and the journals that published such positive reviews. Honchar is accused of using the cathedral image as "the incarnation of all that is good and virtuous in positive heroes of the novel; through it the personalities and the images of the active characters are exposed". The reality in Honchar's novel, say the authors, is depicted as "a kingdom of standard", "drabness of life and everyday greyness"; everybody "is cast from the same mould, where course utilitarian approach reigns", where "there is no purity, no truth..." Honchar "treats the working class in a peculiar manner", say Iurchuk and Lebedenko - unlike in some of Honchar's previous books, there is in Sobor no "symphony of labor, work which becomes beauty". Robitnycha hazeta, Silski visti, Literaturnaia Gazeta, Vitchyzna, Literaturna Ukraina are castigated for having published "glowing reviews" of the novel. Marharyta Malynovs'ka., O. Lupii, V. Ivanysenko, V. Pyanov are singled out by name, as having made a mistake by praising Sobor. The authors find the following statement by O. Lupiy especially offensive: "In the final analysis, it is not only Loboda, and not only this concrete cathedral which concerns us here. Dozens of precious monuments of our culture have been destroyed in the past few years... we speak of the consciousness of an entire nation, and the consciousness of the individual. What a dreadful tragedy it becomes when man's soul is clouded by indifference..." The title supplied by the Digest reads:"Honchar's novel sets off delayed party avalanche."

A593. Iushchenko, Oleksa. "Discovered pearls of poetry." / Oleksa Yushchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.8 (July 1967): 21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Molod' Ukrainy. (12 July 1967): 1-3].

A note about Bohdan Ihor Antonych and a book of his poetry published by the Slovak Pedagogical Publishing House and edited by Mykola Nevrli. Antonych, according to Iushchenko, is "an uncommonly interesting and original poet", but "virtually unknown to readers in the eastern oblasts of Ukraine". But, says the author, Antonych "is slowly emerging from an unjust anonymity" and a publication of his works is being prepared by Radians'kyi Pys'mennyk publishing house in Kyiv. The Digest's supplied title: "Antonych 'emerging from unjust anonymity'."

A594. Ivakin, Iurii. "The problem of quotations. A theoretical sketch." / Yuriy Ivakin. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.6 (June 1974): 14-16. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna 12 (December 1973): 184- 185].

A tongue in cheek feuilleton about the practice of quotation usage by critics. "In the hands of an experienced critic the quotation is a powerful weapon, and for some even the principal method of critical activity... spontaneity and empiricism still prevail in our use of quotations. It is, after all, no secret that individual critics still quote the wrong things, in the wrong manner, and at the wrong time. Some use quotations banal from overuse, some flirt with esthetic quotations far removed from the problems of contemporary life," says Ivakin. He proposes a classification of quotations into categories such as argumental, ornamental, complimentary, self-quotation, etc.

A595. "Ivan Dziuba - young literary critic sentenced in Kyiv." / I.K. ABN Correspondence. 17.4 (July-August 1966): 23-24.

"From Dziuba's published works alone one can see that he possessed all the gifts and qualities to make him the greatest Ukrainian literary critic of the twentieth century", says the author of this article. In his view, Dziuba was silenced "not because he had committed a political offence", but because the Soviet Russian regime intends to stifle Ukrainian national culture and destroy "every germ of individualism".

A596. "Ivan Dzyuba arrested again." Ukrainian Quarterly. 28.2 (Summer 1972): 222.

A 17-line note in the "Chronicle of current events" about a second arrest in Soviet Ukraine of the literary critic Ivan Dziuba. The note is based on reports of several international press agencies dated 1 May 1972.

A597. "Ivan Dzyuba pardoned after 'recantation'." ABN Correspondence. 25.1 (January-February 1974): 28.

The prominent literary critic Ivan Dziuba, according to this news report, "was arrested and sentenced last March to five years of hard labor and five years of exile", but "recanted in a public declaration and was pardoned by the presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Ukrainian SSR."

A598. "Ivan Dzyuba rearrested." ABN Correspondence. 23.3 (May-June 1972): 47.

A brief news item from the Associated Press about the arrest in Kyiv on 17 April 1972 of Ivan Dziuba. According to this report, Dziuba was first arrested in January and was released after ten-hours of questioning.

A599. "Ivan Dzyuba reported pardoned after renunciation of his former views." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.4 (Winter 1973): 441.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events" quotes the New York Times report of 14 November 1973 to the effect that Ivan Dziuba "has been pardoned from a sentence of ten years in prison and exile after renouncing his former attacks on Russian influence in the Ukrainian republic."

A600. "Ivan Franko." Ukrainian Canadian. 24.541 (34) (November 1971): 32. port.

An unsigned note to accompany the translation of Chapter 8 of Zakhar Berkut published in the same issue. [cf. T094]. Says the note in part: "Hounded and persecuted all his life, Franko remained true to his democratic principles and to his people. Published in millions of copies in the various languages of the USSR, translations of his work in other languages establish him as a classic writer of world stature."

A601. "The Ivan Franko memorial competition." Ukrainian Review (London). 14.1 (Spring 1967): 58-59; 14.2 (Summer 1967): 84.

To honor the 50th anniversary of the death of Ivan Franko, a competition was organized and prizes were offered for a pair of poems in English on the themes of "Freedom" and "Captivity". The entries "placed First and Second in the over-all judging", according to this report, were poems authored by Marjorie Baldwin and Sheila Dalton Cybulnyk. These poems, with brief notes on their authors, are printed on pp. 59-62 of the Spring issue. The Summer issue provides notes on the authors of other prize-winning poems, i.e. Vera Arlett, Anne Marx, Hugh McKinley, Edna Bartholomew and Wallace Winchell under the general title: "Prize-winning poems in the Ivan Franko memorial competition." The poems themselves are printed on pp. 85-91.

A602. "Ivan Franko's essay on Shevchenko." Forum. 38 (Winter 1978): 2. port.

An editorial note to accompany Franko's article published in the same issue [cf. A358]. The note relates the story of Franko's essay on Shevchenko, which was sent originally in 1914 to R.W. Seton-Watson for publication in a planned new London quarterly to be called The European Review and was finally published in the University of London journal Slavonic Review. [cf. ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A195]. The portrait which illustrates this editorial note is that of Ivan Franko.

A603. "Ivan Sokulskyy." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.4 (Winter 1973): 64.

About Ivan Sokul's'kyi, the poet, currently in a Dnipropetrovsk prison where, according to this unsigned note, he is "being re-educated as a poet dealing with social themes." No biographical data on Sokul's'lyi is provided.

A604. "Ivan Svitlychnyi in the Perm concentration camp." ABN Correspondence. 25.2 (March-April 1974): 44-45.

A news item about Ivan Svitlychnyi who has been transferred from the KGB internal prison in Kyiv to the Perm concentration camp in the Chusov district.

A605. Ivanchenko, O. "Madrigal as a genre of criticism." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 26. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (1 November 1968): 4].

Ivanchenko feels that "dithyrambic travel notes" that are called "journeys to a writer's creative laboratory", such as the recently published "Zbroya talantu" by V. Malets, should not be published in serious newspapers such as Literaturna Ukraina. The Digest's title: "A plea for moderation in praise of literary criticism."

A606. "Ivanenko, Ksenya Dmitrievna (pen name: Ivanenko, Oksana)." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 225.

Thirty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Oksana Ivanenko (born 1906).

A607. Ivanenko, Volodymyr. "'Kolyadki' and 'Shchedrivki', Christmas and New Year carols" / by Volodimir Ivanenko. Ukrainian Canadian. 25.564 (57) (December 1973): 26-28. illus.

The author discusses koliadky and shchedrivky, citing the works of such scholars as Volodymyr Hoshovs'kyi and Filaret Kolessa. Says Ivanenko: "The beauty and significance of winter holiday songs lies in the fact that the archaic form is retained far more than in other calendar and ritual songs."

A608. "Ivanichuk, Roman Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 225.

About Roman Ivanychuk, the novelist born 1929. (20 lines).

A609. "Ivanov, Leonid Dmitrievich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 222.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines) about Leonid Ivanov, literary critic and pedagogue, born 1913.

A610. "Ivanovich, Vladimir Ieronimovich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 224.

Bio-bibliographical silhouette of 31 lines about the satirical writer Volodymyr Ivanovych, born 1905.

A611. "Ivchenko, Mikhail Yevdokimovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 245.

Thirteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Mykhailo Ivchenko (b.1890, d. in prison in 1939).

A612. "Izborniki Sviatoslava." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 10 (1976): 514.

Defined here as "collections dating from 1073 and 1076, the oldest Kievan Rus' collections and the oldest extant written texts from ancient Rus'." (9 lines + biblio.)

A612a. Jędrzejewicz, Jerzy. "Shevchenko's day of freedom. An Episode in Shevchenko's life." Forum. 15 (Winter 1970-1971): 2-12. illus., ports.

Described by a note as a "free translation, slightly abridged, of part of Chapter IX and the whole of Chapter X of a Polish biography of Taras Shevchenko by Jerzy Jedrzejewicz Noce ukrai skie albo rodowód geniusza, Ukrainian Nights, or the Lineage of a Genius, published 1966 in Warsaw." The note is signed by I. Luchka, apparently, the translator. The except is illustrated with portraits of Shevchenko and his contemporaries Ivan Soshenko, Karl Briullov, Ievhen Hrebinka, P. Engelhardt, V. Zhukovsky (portrait by K. Briullov), D. Hryhorovych (Gregorovich), Mikhail Vielgorsky, O. Venetsianov, A. Mokrytsky, as well as other illustrations including a drawing of Shevchenko by V. Sternberg, a facsimile reproduction of the document certifying Shevchenko's freedom from serfdom, a photo of the building of the Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg, etc.

A613. Jensen, Henning. "Open letter to the Board and Members of the Danish Writers' Union." / Henning Jensen, Valter Loll. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 66.

The letter is dated 26 July 1966 and is signed - on behalf of Demokratisk Alliance - by Henning Jensen, chairman and Valter Loll, secretary. The letter appeals "to all Danish authors and their union" to protest to the Soviet Writers' Union "against the sentence of Svitlychny, against the suppression of the free word, the free cultural exchange among nations and against the attempt to deprive the Ukrainian Nation of the right to express itself in its own language."

A614. Johnson, Lyndon B. "Taras Shevchenko, Ukrainian poet laureate." Forum. 14 (February 1970): 30. port.

A note dated "The White House, October 26, 1964", which says, in part: "It is most appropriate that here in the capital city of this great and free republic a statue of Shevchenko should have been erected to serve as a reminder to all the living, and those who follow us, of his greatness." No source of this statement by the U.S. President is indicated by Forum.

A615. "Joint meeting of the Presidiums of the Creative Unions and Societies of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.5 (May 1976): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (16 March 1976): 1-2].

The Digest's title: "Kozachenko addresses joint meeting of creative unions". According to this news report, V.P. Kozachenko, the first secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine, cited the decisions of the 25th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, the speeches of Brezhnev and Shcherbyts'kyi, and called on writers and artists to justify the party's trust in them, to "strive for greater output and for higher production quality". He is reported to have reminded everyone that "We are all fighters on the ideological front; we stand in the forefront of the struggle for a new, communist ideology..."

A616. "The jubilee of O.P. Dovzhenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.10 (October 1974): 17. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (24 August 1974): 1].

September 1974 marks the 80th anniversary of Oleksandr Dovzhenko, film director and writer. This note from the RATAU news service reports on a series of festivities planned for the occasion, including a jubilee evening in Kyiv, a film festival and an exhibition in the Dovzhenko museum. The Digest's title: "Mark Dovzhenko's anniversary."

A617. "Jubilee publications." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 March 1974): 1].

A note about the publication of V. Prybytkov's novel Ivan Fedorov focusing on the life and work of Ivan Fedorov (b.ca.1525, d.1583), the first printer in Ukraine, and of a small format souvenir album Z hlybyn, with 84 color illustrations - reproductions of the best examples of painted illustrations in ancient Ukrainian manuscripts, with H. Lohvyn's critical commentary. The Digest's title: "Publishers mark quartercentenary [sic] of printing in Ukraine."

A618. "Julia Solntseva films Dovzhenko." Soviet Film. 3 (130) (March 1968): 32. illus.

A brief note about the film "Unforgettable" based on Oleksandr Dovzhenko's war stories written in 1942. "Small poems in prose, filled with the great pain and hatred of one who witnessed the terrible suffering of the people, and with a great love of life and native Ukraine", says the unsigned article. Illustrated with a still from the film.

A619. Kachor, Sophia. "Ivan Kotlyarevsky, 1769-1969." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 20.11-12 (239-240) (November-December 1969): 17.

A 1/2 page bio-bibliographical note on the occasion of a book exhibit at the University of Manitoba (September 30 - October 31) commemorating the 200th anniversary of Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi's birth. The exhibit was sponsored by the Ukrainian Students Literary Circle at the University of Manitoba.

A620. "Kachura, Iakov Dem'ianovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 11 (1976): 331.

Author of short stories and novels, Iakiv Kachura was born 1897 and died as a prisoner of war in 1943. (15 lines plus biblio.)

A621. Kaharlitsky, Mykola. "Mykola Bazhan, poet, philosopher and internationalist." Ukrainian Canadian. 29.596 (90) (January 1977): 35. port.

An article about Mykola Bazhan reprinted from News from Ukraine to accompany the translation of his poem "Iar" ("The ravine") on p.37 [cf. T020]. "Dynamism, sharp conflict, and a wide historic background against which events are described, and where worlds and epochs are frequently compared - these are what characterize [sic] Bazhan's best poems and thematic cycles which predominate in his writings..." says Kaharlitsky.

A622. Kalenichenko, Nina. "Mikhailo Kotsyubinsky: The Birthday Present." Ukraine. 3(19) (1974): 22-23. illus.

Reprint of the introduction from the book of English translations of Mykhailo Kotsiubyns'kyi's short stories The Birthday Present [cf. B047]. Illustrated with reproductions of the book's cover jacket and its title page.

A623. Kal'nyts'kyy, Rafayil. "With the 'current' or artistic search?" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.2 (February 1977): 24-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (2 November 1976): 2].

The author, a senior editor of the Prapor Publishing House in Kharkiv, complains about the mandatory norm for editorial work and what he considers unfair discrimination in evaluating the work of editors of socio-political and artistic literature. Says Kal'nyts'kyy: "An editor of artistic literature is supposed to prepare (in print-ready form) eight printer's sheets (approximately 200 typed pages) of original prose per month (21.6 working days)... The norm is less for poetry. During these same 21.6 working days an editor of socio-political literature has to put out only 3-4 printers' sheets, and of industrial-technical and regional studies-tourist (literature) 4-5 sheets." The Digest's title: "Mandatory editorial output norm considered too high."

A624. Kalynets', Ihor. "The funeral of a friend (a social commentary)." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.2 (Summer 1977): 65-67.

This article, written in the form of a letter and dated Urals, 30 June 1976, is a sarcastic reaction to the poem by Roman Kudlyk "Lenin's school" published in the Lviv journal Zhovten' (June issue, no year given). The article is a translation of a samvydav document circulating in Ukraine.

A625. "Kalynets, Ihor Myronovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 43-44. port.

Thirteen lines about the imprisonment of the poet Ihor Kalynets'.

A626. "Kalynets begins exile in Eastern USSR." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.3 (Autumn 1978): 335.

A note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the poet Ihor Kalynets' who began his three-year sentence of exile in the area of Lake Baikal, USSR.

A627. Karasyonova, Tetyana. "The test of time: on the 80th anniversary of the birth of Volodymyr Hzhyts'kyy." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.12 (December 1975): 17-18. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 October 1975): 2].

The author writes about the revival of readers' interest in the works of Volodymyr Gzhyts'kyi. "Not only his works, but his archival materials have become the subject of study... The Central State Archival Museum of Literature and Art of the Ukrainian SSR", according to this article, "has large holdings of the writer's materials, a significant number of which remains unpublished." Among the unpublished items the author mentions "Spohady pro mynule" written in 1963 and a manuscript of the author's recollections about the writing of the novel Chorne ozero. The Digest's title: "Mark 80th anniversary of V. Hzhyts'kyy birth."

A628. "Karavanskyi, Svyatoslav Yosypovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 46-47. port.

Twenty seven lines about Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi's prison experiences.

A629. "Karavanskyi's sentence extended." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.1 (Spring 1971): 47-48.

A news item reprinted from the Chronicle of Current Events (no.13, 28 April 1970) about an additional term of imprisonment for Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi handed out on 23 April 1970. Karavans'kyi is currently serving out his previous sentence in a Soviet prison.

A630. "The Karavanskys free in the West." Ukrainian Review (London). 27 [sic, i.e.26].4 (Winter 1979): 51-52.

A news brief about the arrival in Vienna on 30 November 1979 of the poet Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi and his wife Nina Strokata, both long time political prisoners in the USSR.

A631. Karpiak, Robert. "Lesia Ukrainka's 'The Stone Host' and 'The Don Juan myth'." Iuvileinyi zbirnyk Ukraïns'koï Vil'noï Akademiï Nauk v Kanadi = The Jubilee Collection of the Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences in Canada. Ed. by O.W. Gerus, A. Baran, J. Rozumnyj. Winnipeg: UVAN, 1976. 249-261.

"As myth, the donjuanesque theme is the product of the collective imagination, the synthesis of ancient legends, tales, and ballads of the supernatural with the more recent tradition of dramatic literature of the Spanish Golden Age," says Karpiak. "In the course of centuries, Don Juan has become a universal symbol, the embodiment of a basic human drive or aspiration." Karpiak traces the links between Lesia Ukrainka's drama "Kaminnyi hospodar" with earlier works which gave the Don Juan myth its artistic expression, especially with Molière's "Don Juan", Mozart's and Da Ponte's "Don Giovanni" and Pushkin's "Kamennyi gost'". In the classical works, says Karpiak, "Don Juan emerges as the incarnation of that male archetype known as the Rebel Son." Lesia Ukrainka "deliberately underscores the affinity between Don Juan and the Rebel Son archetype". In "Kaminnyi hospodar", says Karpiak, the Rebel Son manifests his defiance of authority in the desire to destroy the Father figure incarnated in Don Gonzago." In Lesia Ukrainka's play, "the reconciliation of the Rebel Son with authority is taken to its ultimate degree. This reconciliation is at the same time his punishment. In accepting the symbols of social power, represented in the ritual of donning the cloak and helmet of Don Gonzago, Don Juan proclaims his identity with the Commander. He in fact becomes the Commander and in so doing ceases to exist." In Karpiak's view, "Lesia Ukrainka's portrayal of Donna Anna, from the point of view of archetypology, constitutes a remarkable innovation and signal contribution to the progression of the Don Juan myth." In her aspiration to be free, Donna Anna, says Karpiak, "may be ragarded as the female counterpart of Don Juan himself and as such, incarnates features of the Rebel Daughter archetype." After Don Juan's display of weakness, Donna Anna, in Karpiak's view, becomes the archetype of the fatal woman and he compares her to Lady Macbeth. The only positive figure in the entire drama, according to Karpiak, is the image of Dolores, an original portrayal by Lesia Ukrainka.

A632. Kashchuk, Natalia. "Ukrainian literature at Moscow University." Ukraine. 1(17) (1974): 22-23. illus., port.

About Mykhailo Zozulia [Mikhailo Zozulya], with his portrait and two other illustrations. Zozulia, according to this article, taught Ukrainian literature at Moscow University for forty years and was also a rare book collector.

A633. Kashtanov, S.M. "Galician-Volynian Chronicle." / S.M. Kashtanov and A.G. Kuz'min. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 6 (1975): 53-54.

A twentynine-line note, with bibliography, about the Halyts'ko-volyns'kyi litopys, which is characterized here as "a rather clearly delimited portion of the Hypatian Chronicle, containing a description of events from the beginning of the 13th century to 1292" and being "typically secular and poetic in its style of exposition".

A634. Kasiian, Vasyl. "From my life in art." / Vasil Kasiyan. Forum. 13 (Summer 1970): 8-17. illus.

This memoir of the Ukrainian artist is illustrated with a number of his wood cuts and etchings related to Ukrainian literature. Portraits of Shevchenko appear on p.10, portraits of Kobylians'ka, Franko, Stefanyk and Maksym Ryl's'kyi - on p 12. In addition there are two etchings related to Shevchenko's works on pp. 11 and 15.

A635. Kasinec, Edward. "Jaroslav Isajevyč as historian of the Ukrainian book." Recenzija. 5.1 (Fall-Winter 1974): 12-24.

Iaroslav Isaievych is a scholar specializing in pre-eighteenth century Ukrainian cultural history. Kasinec's bibliographic essay focuses on Isaievych's studies dealing with the old Ukrainian book - its authors and printers, such as his works on Iurii Drohobych, Ivan Fedorov, the Lviv Brotherhood, his catalog of Lviv publications of the 16-18th centuries, etc. Kasinec provides a detailed description of these and expresses some critical remarks on matters of methodology.

A636. Kasinec, Edward. "Soviet Ukrainian works on the old Ukrainian book, 1964-1974: a preliminary bibliography." Recenzija. 5.1 (Fall-Winter 1974): 47-68.

A listing of 162 books and articles, with an introduction (pp. 47-50).

A637. Kasinec, Edward. "Ukrainian literature" / E.K. The Reader's Adviser: A Layman's Guide to Literature. 12th ed. Vol.2: The best in American and British drama and world literature in English translation. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1977. 529-535.

An attempt to provide a bibliographic key to books in English on Ukrainian literature - both criticism and translations of texts. A two page introduction attempts a chronological survey, indicating some of the areas covered in English and pointing out some important lacunae. Pp. 531-535 contain a listing of selected titles with brief annotations, arranged under such categories as "History and criticism", "Collections", "Folk literature" and individual writers.

A638. "Katrya Hrynevycheva, writer, 1875-1947." Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 30.2 (February 1973): 27.

"From having to learn a Ukrainian poem for a program by stydying it phonetically written in Polish, she advanced to become one of the foremost experts on and lovers of the Ukrainian language," says this unsigned note about the novelist Katria Hrynevycheva.

A639. "Katsnelson, Abram Isaakovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 248.

A bio-bibliographical note of 22 lines about the Ukrainian poet and critic Abram Katsnelson (born 1914).

A640. Kaufman, L.S. "Kolessa, Filaret Mikhailovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 578. Biblio.

Filaret Kolessa (1871-1947) is characterized as a "Soviet musicologist, folklorist, composer and literary critic." (18 lines).

A641. Kaye Kysilewsky, Grace E. "The international women's year remembering Natalia Kobrynska and Olena Kysilewska." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 26.10 (October 1975): 24-25. Port.

A biographical article about Natalia Kobryns'ka and Olena Kysilevs'ka, with an emphasis on their contributions to Ukrainian women's organizations. The portrait is that of Olena Kysilevs'ka.

A642. Keenan, Edward L. "On some historical aspects of early book printing in the Ukraine." Recenzija. 5.1 (Fall-Winter 1974): 1-11.

An article on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of printing in Ukraine. The author acknowledges the significance and many achievements in the study of the early book in Ukraine, but expresses regrets that many scholarly works on these topics remain unpublished, that published studies are filled with irrelevant citations and concepts, that the study of the texts themselves has been neglected.

A643. Kharchuk, Borys. "My response to my mourners". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.8 (August 1974): 28. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 June 1974): 4].

A "bourgeois radio station", allegedly, reported Kharchuk's death. "I strongly protest the attempt to exploit my name...", says Kharchuk. He claims, he has returned recently from a creative assignment and is alive and working on new works.

A644. "Khizhnyak, Anton Fedorovich". Prominent Personalities in the USSR (1968). 262.

Thirty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about Antin Khyzhniak, a writer born in 1907.

A645. Kholodnyi, Mykola. "Statement of poet Mykola Kholodnyy." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.1 (Spring 1974): 88-89.

The statement is addressed to the Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine Ovcharenko and to the head of the Union of Writers of Ukraine Honchar and is dated 26 October 1970. The statement, published in Ukrainian Review in an abbreviated form, gives a survey of various instances of cancellations or suspensions for political reasons of planned publication of books of a large group of authors. This publication ban has affected, accorning to the statement, such writers as Mykola Vorobiov [Vorobyov in text], Viktor Kordun, Ihor Kalynets', Vasyl' Holoborod'ko, Mykhailo Skoryk, Viktor Mohyl'nyi [Mohylnyy], Mykola Klochko, Vasyl' Stus, Borys Mozolevs'kyi [Mozolevskyy], Volodymyr Sirenko, Mykola Kucher, Stanislav Zinchuk, Fedir Boiko [Boyko], Oleksa Riznykov, Iaroslav Stupak [Yaroslav Stupak], Stanislav Tsetlian [Tsetlyan], Mykola Danko, Hryhorii Chubai [Hryhoriy Chubay], Nadiia Kyriian [Nadiya Kyryan], Vasyl Ruban, Petro Kutsenko, Mykhailo Sachenko, Hryhorii Tymchenko, Ivan Semenko.

A646. Kholodnyi, Mykola. "To the editors of Literaturna Ukraina. On the scales of conscience. July 4, 1972." / Mykola Kholodnyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.7 (July 1972): 2-3. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 July 1972): 3].

The Digest's title: "Poet repudiates his 'politically incorrect' poems." Says Kholodnyi, among other things: "... having fallen under the evil influence of bourgeois propaganda... as well as having been impressed by false interpretations of personality cult criticism, I began to develop anti-Soviet bourgeois-nationalistic views and to write poems slandering Soviet reality." And again "Taking into account everything I did to harm the Soviet people, I sincerely repent having committed crimes against the Soviet Union." Kholodnyi accuses Svitlychnyi, Sverstiuk, Antonenko-Davydovych, Oksana Meshko, the sculptor Ivan Honchar, as well as Pavlo Murashko and Ivan Matsyns'kyi (both from Czechoslovakia) and others for having given him encouragement and inspiration.

A647. Khorunzhyi, Anatolii. "Man - the most complicated reality". / Anatoliy Khorunzhyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 23-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 November 1968): 2].

A polemical article which takes issue with A. Shevchenko's views about critics and criticism [cf. A1375] and singles out Dziuba's article on Svidzins'kyi [cf. A305] and Pavlychko's poem "Molytva" for adverse critical comments. The Digest's title: "Pavlychko and Dzyuba assailed by party hack."

A648. "Khotkevych, Gnat Martynovich (pen and stage name: Galayda, Gnat)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 273.

Twenty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about Hnat Khotkevych, writer, playwright, stage director, composer. The dates of birth and death are given as 31 December 1877, 8 October 1938.

A649. Khropko, Petro. "Mirny, conscience of a people." Forum. 13 (Summer 1970): 18-19. port.

A study of the life and work of Panas Myrnyi, with his b/w portrait. "Mirny has gone down in the history of Ukrainian literature as an innovator", says Khropko. Myrnyi's novel Khiba revut' voly, iak iasla povni, in the author's view, "marked the enrichment of genre in Ukrainian prose and the further expansion of the boundaries and capacities of the realistic method in writing. It was the first great Ukrainian social novel... in which the complex socio- economic processes after the abolition of serfdom were profoundly revealed." "The chapters written by I. Bilyk", says Khropko, "are more of a publicist nature, whereas Mirny's are distinguished by a plasticity of rendition, subtleness of psychological portrayal of his heroes, and a variegated poetic palette and freshness of interpretation." Khropko discusses also other works by Myrnyi, especially the novel Poviia. Says Khropko about the latter: "socio- psychological novel 'The Prostitute' was his best sample of realistic writing... It develops into a wrathful narrative about the fate of a people under oppression and injustice."

A650. "Khvylovyy, Mykola (pen name: Nikolay Fitilyova [sic]." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972).

Twenty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Mykola Khvylovyi (real name: Fitilev), who was born on 13 December 1893 and committed suicide on 13 May 1933 "after incessant Party criticism".

A651. "Kiev Committee denounces trial of Rudenko and Tykhy." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.3 (Autumn 1977): 335.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events" about a statement released in London on 2 July 1977 on behalf of the Ukrainian Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords by P. Hryhorenko and others. The statement claims that the investigation and trial of Mykola Rudenko and Oleksii Tykhyi "were conducted by 'gangster-like methods'."

A652. "Kiev historian a suicide after KGB searches home." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.3 (Autumn 1979): 309.

A news item in "Ucrainica in American and foreign periodicals" digesting a report in the New York Times of 13 March 1979 about the suicide of Mykhailo Mel'nyk, a member of the Ukrainian "Helsinki Group".

A653. "Kiev, January 15. Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. International relations of Ukrainian literature." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. 16 January 1970): 1].

A news item about the 4th Plenum which took place in Kyiv, with officials of the Communist Party P.M. Fedchenko, I.A. Peresadenko, V.V. Lenets, F.M. Rudych participating. Present also were the editors of the Russian journals Druzhba narodov, Literaturna Gazeta, Sovetskaia literatura, as well as representatives of Belorussian and Moldavian writers. Oles' Honchar opened the Plenum; P. Zahrebel'nyi delivered the opening address [cf. A1752]. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian writers hold plenum on international relations of Ukrainian literature".

A654. "Kiev-Pecherskii Patericon". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 451. Biblio.

Kyievo-Pechers'kyi Pateryk characterized as "a monument of Old Russian literature; a collection of stories about the monks of the Kiev-Pecherskii Monastery and its history". (15 lines).

A655. "Kievskaia starina (Kievan antiquity)". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 452. Biblio.

Characterized as "a historical journal of bourgeois-liberal tendency that was published monthly in Kiev, in Russian, from 1882 to 1906." (14 lines).

A656. Kin'ko, A. "Folklore fieldwork for future philologists. Letter to the editor." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.10 (October 1974): 16-17. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka osvita. (14 August 1974): 2].

"....practical training in regional studies and folklore should be revived in the philology departments of pedagogical institutions...," says Kin'ko. The Digest's title: "Return to folklore studies for teachers urged."

A657. Kipa, Albert A. "Ivan Franko's view of Gerhart Hauptmann." Probleme der Komparatistik und Interpretation. Festschrift für André Gronicka zum 65. Geburtstag am 25.5.1977. Hrsg. von Walter H. Sokel, Albert A. Kipa, Hans Ternes. Bonn: Bouvier Verlag Herbert Grundmann, 1978. 136-141.

Franko wrote two articles on Gerhart Hauptmann, says Kipa. The first of these, a fragment written probably in 1892 was about Franko's enthusiastic reaction to Hauptmann's drama "Die Weber". The fragment was written in Polish and was probably intended for publication in the newspaper Kurjer Lwowski where Franko was a regular correspondent. The other piece was Franko's essay on Hauptmann's life and work written in 1898 and published in the Literaturno-naukovyi vistnyk. Franko appreciated Hauptmann's "creative use of realistic technique, his hard-eyed yet heart-felt powers of observation", says Kipa, but he could not "accept the German dramatist's then unconventional and symbolic style..."

A658. Kipnis, Grigori. "Periodicals and other publications." Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 190-191.

A survey of Ukrainian literary journals (Vitchyzna, Radianske literaturoznavstvo, Dnipro, Raduga, Donbas et al.), of literary series of prose and poetry, and of major encyclopedic publications. This issue of Soviet Literature is devoted to Ukrainian literature and art.

A659. "Kirilyuk, Yevgeniy Prokhorovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 274.

A bio-bibliographical note of 44 lines about the literary critic and scholar Ievhen Kyryliuk, born 1902.

A660. "Kirill of Turov". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 508. Biblio.

Kyrylo Turivs'kyi characterized as a "church figure and writer in ancient Rus'" (born ca.1130's, died no later than 1182). (12 lines).

A661. Kirkconnell, Watson. "Ukrainian literature in Manitoba." Mosaic. 3.3 (Spring 1970): 39-47.

This issue of Mosaic is dedicated to the Manitoba centennial. Kirkconnell provides a historical survey from 1892 - the year that first Ukrainian settlers arrived in Winnipeg. The most notable book of the pioneer generation, says Kirkconnell, was a book of "artless lyrics" by Theodore Fedyk (1873-1949) [Songs of the Old Land and the New, published in 1908] - by 1934 "it had passed through many printings and had sold over 50,000 copies." Among the authors born in Ukraine, but educated in Canada, who wrote in Ukrainian, the most notable, according to Kirkconnell, was Honoré Ewach (1900-1964). He was the author of Holos zemli (Voice of the Soil), published in 1937 - in Kirkconnell's view, the "chief work of Ukrainian fiction produced in Manitoba". Kirkconnell mentions also some Ukrainian writers who visited Manitoba briefly, among them Petro Karmans'kyi, Teodosii Os'machka, Myroslav Irchan. The Canadian-born generation is writing in English, says Kirkconnell and his forecast for the future is dubious: "...failing a constant stream of migrants from abroad, Manitoban literature in Ukrainian will cease with the close of the twentieth century..." The article is interspersed with selections of poetry in Watson Kirkconnell's translation, i.e. " *** (A Wanderer here in Winnipeg)" by Teodor Fedyk (1873-1949), [20 lines, pp.40-41]; "Symphonic portrait in words (Had I the mighty genius of a Rembrandt)" by Honoré Ewach (1900-1964), [12 lines, p.42]; "In Rome (On vanished Caesars' cypresses)" by Petro Karmans'kyi (1878-1956) [25 lines, p.42]; "In the concentration camp (The window shows the roofs piled high with snow)" by Teodosii Os'machka (1895-1962) [24 lines, p.43]; "Forty below zero (The homes have muffled up their throats)" by Stepan Semczuk (b.1899) [8 lines, p.44]; "Gabriele D'Annunzio (D'Annunzio desired, secure from pain)" by Mykyta Mandryka (b.1886), [28 lines, pp.44-45].

For identifications of individual works see Index.

A662. Kirkconnell, Watson. "Ukrainian literature in Manitoba". Iuvileinyi zbirnyk Ukraïns'koï Vil'noï Akademiï Nauk v Kanadi = The Jubilee Collection of the Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences in Canada. Ed. by O.W. Gerus, A. Baran, J. Rozumnyj. Winnipeg: UVAN, 1976. 622-631.

Possibly a reprint or a slightly modified version of the article in Mosaic. [cf. A661]. A survey of Ukrainian belles lettres produced in Manitoba by the early folk poets of the pioneer era, then by Canadian-trained generation who still wrote in Ukrainian and by occasional visitors or temporary residents from abroad who were established Ukrainian writers. The most successful of the folk poets was Theodore Fedyk (1873-1949) whose "collection of nineteen artless lyrics, Song of the Old Land and the New," according to Kirkconnell, "sold over 50,000 copies". Fedyk's poem "Easter bread (A wanderer here in Winnipeg)" is quoted in Watson Kirkconnell's translation [p.624, 20 lines]. Honore Ewach (1900-1964) is singled out by the author as a representative of the second group and his poem "Symphonic portrait in words (Had I the mighty genius of Rembrandt)" appears in W. Kirkconnell's translation on p. 625 [12 lines]. Among authors who stayed in Manitoba for a while are named Petro Karmans'kyi (1878- 1956) and T. Os'machka (1895-1962). Karmans'kyi's poem "In Rome (On vanished Caesar's cypresses)" [p.625. 25 lines] is printed in W. Kirkconnell's translation. Os'machka's poem "In the concentration camp (The window shows the roofs piled high with snow)", translated by C. Andrusyshen and W. Kirkconnell, is reprinted from The Ukrainian Poets on pp. 626-627 [24 lines]. Later arrivals to Canada, Stepan Semczuk (b. 1899) and Mykyta I. Mandryka (b. 1886) are represented by one translation each, also reprinted from The Ukrainian Poets and translated by the same translators. Semczuk's "Forty below zero (The homes have muffled up their throats)" appears on p.627 (8 lines); Mandryka's "Gabriele D'Annunzio (D'Annunzio desired, secure from pain)" - on p.628. [28 lines]. Among writers of fiction Watson Kirkconnell singles out Honore Ewach, author of Holos zemli and among playwrights, Dmytro Hunkevych [Hunkewich] and Myroslav Irchan. For identifications of individual works see Index.

A663. "Kiselev, Aleksandr Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 275.

Twenty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about the literary scholar Oleksandr Kysel'ov, born 1903.

A664. "Kiselev, Iosif Mikhaylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 276.

A bio-bibliographical note about the literary critic Iosyp Kysel'ov (born 1905, d. 1980) (38 lines). Kysel'ov also wrote poetry in Russian.

A665. "Klochchya, Andrey Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 279.

Twenty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about Andrii Klochchia, a writer and literary critic born 1905.

A666. Klymasz, Robert B. "Social and cultural motifs in Canadian Ukrainian lullabies." Slavic and East European Journal. 12.2 (Summer 1968): 176-183. Notes.

The fifty Ukrainian lullaby texts collected by the author in Western Canada in 1963 and 1964 are part of his collection of field tape-recordings of Canadian Slavic folklore. The article focuses attention on certain social and cultural patterns of behaviour reflected in these lullabies. "The Ukrainian lullaby as found in Canada..." says the author, "has a dual function. Its primary, overt purpose, of course, is to encourage the child to fall asleep. However, the special lullaby situation sets the stage for the introduction of its secondary, covert, but no less significant function as an outlet for the verbalization of two kinds of repressed emotions: 1/ the conflict between the mother's own ego on the one hand, and her maternal obligation on the other; 2/ her revolt against those cultural patterns which isolate her, render her helpless, and subject her to pain and the humiliation of her husband's cruelty. In this latter connection, the classic, "pure" lullaby is transformed into a type of female protest song directed against the traditionally dominant and oppressive role of the husband as sanctioned by the Ukrainian peasant community and its cultural institutions." The texts quoted for purposes of illustration are given in the original Ukrainian, without translation.

A667. Klymasz, Robert B. "Ukrainian folklore in Canada: the big put-down." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 3.1 (Spring 1978): 66-77.

The author provides a survey of collections and scholarly studies of Ukrainian Canadian folklore and attempts to characterize the "Ukrainian folkloric complex in Canada" as one that "operates in terms of three interrelated yet fairly distinct segments or layers of materials - traditional, transitional, and innovational." As examples of the traditional layer he lists shchedrivky, vesnianky, plachi, baiky. Ukrainian ethnic jokes, according to Klymasz, belong to the transitional cycle. The innovational layer is an attempt to reconstruct the tradition, in the author's words: "Selected retentions merge with new phenomena to produce a streamlined modern-day version of the folkloric legacy."

A668. Klymenko, Mykola. "Branded a traitor." / Mykola Klymenko, Yakiv Radchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.3 (March 1971): 21-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (30 January 1971): 3].

The poet Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi, a long term political prisoner in the USSR and now in the United States, is characterized here as "saboteur and agent of two foreign intelligence services" and a "master of ideological subversion". This attack on Sviatoslav Karavans'klyi ends with ten lines of a poem by Dmytro Pavlychko "Oh you 'fighters' for Ukraine" in an unattributed literal translation. The Digest's title: "Anti-Soviet activities laid to Karavans'kyy".

A669. Klynovyi, Iurii. "Vasyl Stefanyk's heroes in the reality." / Yuriy Klynovy. Ukrainian Quarterly. 28.1 (Spring 1972): 28-36.

The writer's son Iurii Stefanyk (aka Iurii Klynovyi) reveals the true names and events which served as protagonists and subject matter of Vasyl Stefanyk's miniature masterpieces. The essay is based not only on the author's intimate knowledge of the writer's environment in his village Rusiv, but also on Vasyl Stefanyk's personal notes and correspondence. Klynovyi writes of Stefanyk's "unusual sensitivity and an intense sympathy for human suffering with an equally intense desire to alleviate it" and "his completely personal relationship to his actual heroes..." Klynovyi's article is accompanied by a page-long editorial note about Vasyl Stefanyk on p.28.

A670. Kniazeva, S.P. "Mikitenko, Ivan Kondrat'evich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 16 (1977): 298.

Ivan Mykytenko (1897-1937), says Kniazeva, was "a talented playwright. His best plays deal with the new social relations and man's cultural and intellectual development". (34 lines).

A671. Kniazeva, S.P. "Mysik, Vasilii Aleksandrovich (also Mysyk)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 289. Biblio.

About Vasyl' Mysyk (1907-1983). Frequent themes in Mysyk's poetry, according to Kniazeva, "are man's personal responsibility for peace on earth, the necessity of learning from past history and of preserving one's national heritage." (21 lines).

A672. Kniazeva, S.P. "Nechui-Levitskii, Ivan Semenovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 407. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 30 lines about Ivan Nechui-Levytskyi (1838-1918) whose considerable literary legacy includes novels, short stories and plays. "Some of his works", says Kniazeva, "especially those that portray the life of the intelligentsia, contain elements of Ukrainian bourgeois nationalism..."

A673. Kniazeva, S.P. "Osnova". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 18 (1878): 588-589. Biblio.

Characterized as "the first Ukrainian sociopolitical and literary journal", which had, according to Kniazeva, "a bourgeois-liberal orientation". Osnova was published from January 1861 to September 1862. (15 lines).

A674. Kniazeva, S.P. "Smotritskii, Meletii." / S. Kniazeva. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 23 (1979): 576. Biblio.

Meletii Smotryts'kyi (1578-1637) is characterized as "Scholar and philologist, churchman and public figure of southwestern Rus'". Smotryts'kyi's "only work of real importance is The Correct Syntagm of Slavonic Grammar (1619)..." in Kniazeva's opinion. She claims that "His writings are marked by clarity and by orderliness of presentation." (28 lines).

A675. Knysh, Heorhii. "The years of growth."/ Heorhiy Knysh. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.10 (October 1975): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (22 August 1975): 2].

An article about Rostyslav Bratun', about his career "from the best pioneer in the Horokhiv region in Volyn" to an acclaimed poet and public activist, editor-in-chief of the journal Zhovten', head of the executive board of the Lviv writers organization and a Soviet delegate to the United Nations. The titles of Bratun's books are given without comments or full bibliographical data. The Digest's title: "Rostyslav Bratun: a portrait."

A676. "Kobrynskaia, Natal'ia Ivanovna". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 558. Biblio.

Nataliia Kobryns'ka (1855-1920) is characterized as a "Ukrainian writer, initiator and organizer of the women's movement in Galicia." According to GSE, Kobryns'ka "depicted the difficult life of the Galician Ukrainian village, condemned the class caste system, and the narrow-minded upbringing of women and created original, realistic characters in her best stories..." (17 lines).

A677. "Kobyletsky, Yuriy Sviridovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 282.

A bio-bibliographical note of 39 lines about the writer and critic Iurii Kobylets'kyi whose real name was Ivan Kobylets'kyi (born 1905).

A678. "Kobylianskaia, Ol'ga Iulianovna". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 559. Biblio.

Ol'ha Kobylians'ka, says this 30-line unsigned entry, "defended woman's right to work and to civil independence and opposed the timeserving practiced by the bourgeois intelligentsia. This is seen in her works..." As an author, she "penetrated into the inner world of man and revealed the psychology of her protagonists."

A679. "Kobylyanskaya, Ol'ga Yulianovna." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 284.

Twenty-four lines of bio-bibliographical data about the novelist Ol'ha Kobylians'ka (b.27 November 1863, d. 21 March 1942).

A680. "Kocherga, Ivan Antonovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 284.

Bio-bibliographical data about the playwright Ivan Kocherha (b. 6 October 1881, d. 29 December 1952).

A681. Kochur, Hryhorii. "Cervantes' novel in Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.6 (June 1967) 20-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vsesvit. 1 (January 1967): 86-87].

About Cervantes and the translations of his novel Don Quixote into Ukrainian. Ivan Franko's verse interpretation of Don Quixote was published in 1891, but the first complete prose translation, according to Kochur, appeared in 1927 and was republished in 1935 and 1936. "Although the author of that translation, M. Ivanov, was proficient in Spanish and did a conscientious job - his version of the great novel is rather poor stylistically. Besides, his translation is an abridged and modified adaptation", says Kochur. A complete translation prepared by V. Kozachenko and Ievhen Krotevych [Ye. Krotevich], published in 1955 is, in Kochur's view, inadequate, because it is a translation of a Russian translation by Lyubimov. The first real Ukrainian translation of Cervantes' novel by M. Lukash will be in Kochur's view "a translation which will meet the most rigid standards. It will be distinguished by a profound understanding of the original and by a remarkable artistry with words."

A682. "Kochur, Hryhoriy." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 49.

Five lines about the arrest of Hryhorii Kochur, the literary scholar and translator.

A683. "Kochura (real name: Kochur), Afanasiy Fedorovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 284.

Bio-bibliographical data (24 lines) about Panas Kochura, a writer born 1905.

A684. "Kolesnik, Petr Iosifovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 287.

A bio-bibliographical note (31 lines) about the literary critic and scholar Petro Kolesnyk (born 1905).

A685. Kolesnyk, Petro. "Kotsiubinskii, Mikhail Mikhailovich." / P.I. Kolesnik. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 452-453. Biblio.

Mykhailo Kotsiubyns'kyi (1864-1913), according to Kolesnyk, "entered the history of Ukrainian literature as an artist of the revolution and greatly influenced the development of soviet [sic] Ukrainian prose, notably the writers A. Golovko [i.e. Holovko], A. Dovzhenko, Iu. Ianovskii and O. Gonchar [i.e. Honchar]..." (44 lines).

A686. "Kolessa, Filaret Mikhaylovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 288.

Twenty-nine line of bio-bibliographical data on Filaret Kolessa, ethnographer, music historian and folklorist. (b.17 July 1871, d.3 March 1947).

A687. Kolinko, Vladimir. "The world of Ivan Drach, poet of the Ukraine." Soviet Life. 2(245) (February 1977): 56-58. port., illus.

Drach's books, in Kolinko's words, "are characterized by intensity of thought. The whole universe takes up its abode in the poet's heart. He tries to understand the tragic contradictions of the epoch... In both content and form Ivan Drach's poetry is complicated. It cannot just be read, it has to be understood... That is what made many people uneasy about the young poet. They shied away from his associations and complexity of expression..." Kolinko mentions the fact that some critics accused the poet of being "abstruse, formalistic, even shallow" and that some were irritated by his "unusual imagery". He also mentions "the unusual clashes of opinion" of fifteen years ago, "because a new generation of young poets had emerged" who "were making a painstaking search for new means of artistic expression", who "wanted to intellectualize poetry". Besides Drach, Vitalii Korotych [Korotich], Vasyl' Symonenko [Vasil Simonenko], Boris Oliinyk, Mykola Vinhranovs'kyi [Mikola Vingranovsky] and Lina Kostenko are mentioned in this context. The article is illustrated with b/w photographs by Stanislav Kryachko: full page portraits of Ivan Drach and of his mother, and three group portraits of Drach with young readers, with the poets Bazhan and Korotych, and with his wife and children. An unattributed translation of Drach's poem "White candle" appears on p.58. [cf. T059].

A688 . "Kolomiets, Aleksey Fedotovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 289.

Twenty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer and journalist Oleksii Kolomiiets' (born 1919).

A689. "Kolomiets, Tamara Afanasevna." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 289.

About the poet Tamara Kolomiiets' (born 1935) (16 lines).

A690. "Kolomiets, Vladimir Rodionovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 289.

Volodymyr Kolomiiets' is a poet born 1935. (10 lines).

A691. "Kolomyika". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 591. Biblio.

Defined by this entry as "A short song resembling the chastushka, a genre of Ukrainian folk poetry". (13 lines).

A692. "Komar, Boris Afanasevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 291.

Twenty lines about Borys Komar, a writer born 1928.

A693. "Kompaniets, Lidia Aleksandrovna." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 293.

About the poet and author of children's books Lidiia Kompaniiets' (born 1914) (28 lines).

A694. Kononenko-Moyle, Natalie. "Dumy - the problem of variants." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1970-1971. 1 (1970-1971): 63-65. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read on 27 April 1971 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker was at the time a Ph.D. candidate in Slavic and Turkish Folklore at Harvard University. In her view, as reported here, "The material of a duma is recomposed in each performance. This method of performance requires the mastery of a special technique - the technique of narration within certain verse structure requirements." Consequently, "the method of performance makes each performance a different text, called variant."

A695. Kononenko-Moyle, Natalie. "Dumy". / Natalie Kononenko-Moyle and Andrij Hornjatkevyč. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 52- 56. Biblio.

Summary of two papers read on 15 February 1973 and of the discussion that followed. Natalie Kononenko-Moyle, a Ph.D. candidate in Slavic and Turkish Folklore at Harvard University, characterized Ukrainian dumy in general and gave an outline of Ukrainian dumy scholarship. Andrij Hornjatkevyč, a lecturer in Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University, spoke about verse patterns and melody of the dumy, and claimed that "the dumy have neither verse pattern nor a fixed melody", that "each performer may sing some particular duma to a different melody."

A696. Konovalov, Hennadii. "The antihistorical exercises of B. Kharchuk". / Hennadiy Konovalov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.2 (February 1974): 8-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 December 1973): 3].

A follow-up to an article by Iurii Iarmysh (Yuriy Yarmysh in text) "Contrary to life's truth", that discusses the work of Borys Kharchuk. [cf. A495]. Konovalov takes issue with such critics as Vsevolod Tkachenko and V. Rossels who have praised Kharchuk's books for children. Konovalov's focus is on Kharchuk's story Dva dni, published by Veselka in 1972. The critic accuses Kharchuk of "ideological misrepresentations and antihistorical excursions", of "propagation of the supremacy of national over social interests". The Digest supplied title reads: "Kharchuk scored for 'antihistoricism'".

A697. Konovalov, Hennadii. "The intensity of creative effort." / Hennadiy Konovalov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (5 June 1970): 1, 3].

The special correspondent of Literaturna Ukraina reports on the conference of young prose writers and especially on the views expressed by L. Novychenko in his address to the conference. [cf. A317]. The Digest's title: "Conference of young prose writers held in Kiev."

A698. "Konvisar, Vladimir." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 297.

Volodymyr Konvisar is a Ukrainian writer born 1911 (25 lines).

A699. Kopach, Oleksandra. "Movostyl Kobylianskoji = Abstract of the language and style of Ol'ha Kobylians'ka". In her Movostyl' Ol'hy Kobylians'ko . Toronto: Kanads'ke Naukove Tovarystvo im. Shevchenka, 1972. 180-182.

English summary of a book in Ukrainian.

A700. "Kopylenko, Aleksandr Ivanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 295.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines) about the writer Oleksandr Kopylenko (b. 1 August 1900, d.1 December 1958).

A701. Korenevych, L. "Books in our life." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.1 (January 1971): 21-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Robitnycha hazeta (14 November 1970): 2].

An analysis of a readers' sample. 1250 questionnaires were sent to workers and engineering- technical employees of the Zhdaniv factory of heavy machine -building, Lviv factory of loaders and the chemists of Vynnytsia. 743 questionnaires were returned (= 59.9%) The most popular books among readers were historical works. Satire and humor was in second place, followed by works of a military nature, the classics, works on contemporary subjects, science fiction and, finally, detective fiction. Less popular, but read regularly by over 200 readers were documentary- artistic works, memoirs and poetry. Korenevych notes that readers complained about inadequate selection of books, about not having their demands met; the readers claimed, says Korenevych, that "there is a shortage of classics in bookstores, that the editions of historical novels are too small, that there are few memoirs by prominent Soviet military leaders..." The Digest's title: "Study reveals readers' tastes and interests."

A702. "Korneychuk, Aleksandr Yevdokimovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 300.

A longer bio-bibliographical note of 64 lines about the playwright Oleksandr Korniichuk (born 1905).

A703. Korolevych, Ninel'. "The register of book wisdom." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 May 1970): 2].

The author notes with satisfaction that the first multi-volume bibliographical work Knyhy URSR, 1917-1967 is about to be published, but calls for the creation of "a complete bibliography of Ukrainian pre-October literature." Bibliohrafichnyi pokazhchyk novoi ukrainskoi literatury by M. Komarov (1831) and the Halyts'ko-rus'ka bibliohrafiia by Ivan Levyts'kyi (no date given, but first volume was published in 1888) are mentioned as useful predecessors which are presently "exceedingly rare, inaccessible even to specialists."

A704. Korotych, Vitalii. "Invitation to a journey." / Vitali Korotich. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968) 3-4.

An introduction to the special issue of the journal dedicated to Soviet Ukrainian literature and art. Korotych, although not named as such, is apparently the issue's editor. Ukrainian literature in this issue is represented by selections of Ukrainian poetry, prose and literary criticism by the following authors: Smolych, Ianovs'kyi, Pervomais'kyi, Zbanats'kyi, Babliak, Honchar, Syzonenko, Zahrebelnyi, Hutsalo, Tiutiunnyk, Vyshnia, Tychyna, Ryl's'kyi, Sosiura, Pluzhnyk, Bazhan, Mysyk, Nahnybida, Malyshko, Voronko, Pavlychko, Drach, Korotych, Lubkivskyi, Donchyk, Chikovani, Bilets'kyi, Burkatov. In the introduction Korotych writes of literature as "the memory and conscience of the Ukrainian people".

A705. Korotych, Vitalii. "Korotych hits week spots in publishing." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.1 (January 1967): 11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 November 1966): 3].

Title supplied by the Digest. Korotych in a speech at the Fifth Congress of Writers talks about the need to publish in Ukraine the works of Bohdan Ihor Antonych, Ievhen Pluzhnyk, Panteleimon Kulish, Mykola Kulish, about the necessity to establish in Ukraine a publishing house for foreign literature and for foreign translations of Ukrainian literature.

A706. Korotych, Vitalii. "Let us carry our culture into the world." / Vitaliy Korotych. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 January 1970): 2].

A speech at the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. Korotych calls for the establishment of "a special publishing house of foreign literature, whose task it would be not only to translate foreign works into Ukrainian, but also to translate Ukrainian works into foreign languages." He mentions that the Moscow journal Soviet Literature sometimes publishes translations from Ukrainian, but, in his view, "this is not enough. It does not reflect the prestige of our literature." Foreign literature, says Korotych, is taught in Ukrainian schools as part of the Russian literature course. "... the time has come to include these lectures into the courses on Ukrainian literature". The Digest's title: "Korotych proposes aid to foreign translators of Ukrainian works."

A707. Korotych, Vitalii. "The professors." / Vitali Korotich. Soviet Literature. 10 (379) (1979): 164-175.

A chapter from a book of essays about the author's travels in the USA and his encounters with Americans. Korotych writes of his lectures about Soviet literature at American universities and of his readings of his own poetry.

A708. Korotych, Vitalii. "Responsibility". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 August 1976): 2].

Korotych writes of his experiences in working on a documentary film "Ia - vodolaz #2" and about his collaboration with the Latvian writer Imant Ziedonis on a book about Tadzhikistan. The Digest's title: "Korotych advises novice writers about responsibility".

A709. Korotych, Vitalii. "A sentimental journey to the so- called end of the world." / Vitali Korotich. Tr. by Alex Miller. Soviet Literature. 11 (308) (1973): 129-149.

A travelogue about Korotych's journey from Moscow to Abakan (Siberia) and Kamchatka, visiting the lands of the Khakassian, Udeghe and Koryak peoples.

A710. Korotych, Vitalii. "7th Congress of Ukraine's Writers. Discussion following the report of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine and of the Audition Commission of the UWU." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 24-25. [ cerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 April 1976): 3].

Korotych calls for a new journal similar to Druzhba narodov and a commission, like the one in Georgia, "to compile plans of works that are worthy of translation" into Russian. Korotych speaks of provincialism, as being "equally distasteful in all its many aspects" and of "the great Russian language which has become the second native language of all our citizens..." The Digest's title: "Speech by Vitaliy Korotych."

A711. Korotych, Vitalii. "Taking a close look (Pages from an English diary)." / Vitali Korotich. Soviet Literature. 11 (368) (1978): 156-168.

A memoir about the writer's encounters and polemics with English journalists and writers. Korotych is identified in a footnote as a Ukrainian poet.

A712. "Koryak, Vladimir Dmitriyevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 300.

Twenty-eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about Volodymyr Koriak, literary historian and critic, born 14 January 1889, died in imprisonment 12 April 1939.

A713. Koryeva, Ye. "The great son of the Ukrainian people. Festivities in Moscow on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the birth of H. S. Skovoroda." / Ye. Koryeva, P. Kosolapov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (14 December 1972): 1-2].

About a festive meeting held at the Bolshoi Theater with members of the Politburo, prominent writers and artists participating. V.Yu. Malanchuk, Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine and I.K. Bilodid, chairman of the Ukrainian Skovoroda jubillee committee spoke at the meeting. [Digest's title: "Celebrate Skovoroda anniversary in Kiev, Moscow". [cf. also A319].

A714. Korzh, Viktor. "To the eternally damned". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.7 (July 1974): 29-30. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (reprinted from Zoria (Dnipropetrovsk). (May 35 [sic] 1974): 3].

Korzh expresses a regret that his speech at the Fifth Congress of the Writers of Ukraine was quoted and used by "the ideological hucksters from nationalist centers in the West", that it gave them "a pretext for whipping up their poisonous and malicious theories in the rotting churn of anti-Soviet propaganda". Korzh ends his article with a 27-line poem which is given by the Digest in an unattributed translation and begins with the following lines: "I will not call monsters human, those gentlemen with blood-stained hands..." There is an appended note by the editors of the Digest with a reference to the January 1967 issue of the Digest, where the original speech by V. Korzh appeared in an abbreviated translation and a few quotations from that speech. The Digest's title reads: "Korzh calls earlier concern for Ukrainian language 'immature' and 'erroneous'."

A715. Kosach, Iurii. "The Jeremiad of Solzhenitsyn" / Yuriy Kosach. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 March 1974): 4].

"A. Solzhenitsyn is a godsend to the rotting Black Hundreds beyond our borders," says Kosach. He is surprised that "Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists" find Solzhenitsyn likable. Solzhenitsyn, says Kosach, "has clearly shown himself to be an aristocrat who regards 'Little Russian ravings' about self-determination from the same positions as Katkov and Valuyev." The Digest's title reads: "Solzhenitsyn denounced by pro-Soviet Ukrainian emigré writer."

A716. Kosach, Iurii. "Speech by Yuriy Kosach." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.10 (October 1973): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 September 1973): 3].

Iurii Kosach spoke at the unveiling of Lesia Ukrainka's statue in Kyiv. Says Kosach: "The immortalization of Lesya Ukrainka's memory in bronze and marble is a great day of rejoicing not only for the Ukrainian and other peoples of the Soviet Union, but also for Ukrainians who live in North and South America..." The Digest's title: "Kosach brings greetings from abroad."

A717. Kosach, Iurii. "Such is truth, gentlemen". / Yuriy Kosach. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 May 1970): 4].

Kosach accuses Ukrainian émigre critics of ideological bias: writers who are ideologically unacceptable, says Kosach, are accused of being weak artistically and vice versa. Kosach mentions Emmanuel Reis as one critic deliberately disqualifying poets such as Federico Garcia Lorca, Pablo Neruda, Jiri Wolker Julian Tuwim, because of their leftist views and the editors of Koordynaty who included Kosach's own poetry in the anthology with a critical remark about his weaknesses in the artistic sense, "because he supports a pro-Soviet platform." The Digest's title: "Kosach scores Suchasnist', Koordynaty, lays double standards to Western critics".

A718. "Kosaryk (real name: Kovalenko), Dmitriy Mikhaylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 304.

A bio-bibliographical note of 54 lines about Dmytro Kosaryk, writer and literary critic born 1904.

A719. Kostaniuk, C. "Ukrainian monuments in Winnipeg." Ukrainian Canadian. 26.569 (620 (May 1974): 84-86. illus.

History of monuments to Shashkevych, Shevchenko and Franko in Winnipeg illustrated with photos of the three monuments.

A720. "Kostenko, Lina Vasilevna." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 305.

This brief (17 lines) bio-bibliographical note about the poet Lina Kostenko contains the following statement: "Career: 1957 accused of practicing formalism, trying to be original by intentionally complicating images and using 'formal tricks'; 1963 criticized for pol. negligent attitude toward lit. work, emphasizing wrong problems."

A721. Kostenko, Natalia. "The Bard of the new era." / Natalya Kostenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.11 (November 1974): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 October 1974): 2].

Digest's title: "Bazhan honored on 70th birthday." Kostenko provides a critical silhouette of Mykola Bazhan, the poet who, according to Kostenko, began his creative career in painting, was attracted in 1923-24 to futurism and then "began making his way toward realism". The author characterizes some of Bazhan's longer poems, such as "Budivli", "Rozmova serdets'", "Bezsmeria", "Danylo Halyts'kyi", "Bilia Spas'koi vezhi", "Umans'ki spohady". "Bazhan's literary style is characterized by a unique combination of dynamics and statics. At times, in his narrative poems, with their great range of philosophical and social symbolism, the dynamics remain invisible. They surface as individual rhythmic displacements, irregularities - changes in metres [sic], rhythms, asthrophic constructions, plays on rhymes and so forth. But the great majority of the writer's works has an internal dynamism - an irroconcilable conflict, contrasting ideas, dissonance, the clash of direct meanings and connotations, abrupt changes in intonation. Since the end of the 1950's, the plot lines in Bazhan's works have become more maneuverable, as it were, his language has become more flexible, the requisite precision and profundity mark his psychological analyses. All this has intensified the lyrical stream in his poetry. Still, the epic saturated with humanistic pathos, holds a special place in Bazhan's writing..." says Natalia Kostenko.

A722. Kostiuchenko, Viktor. "Children, books and the future." / Victor Kostyuchenko. Ukraine. 1(37) (1979): 24-25. col. illus.

Kostiuchenko discusses several generations of Ukrainian children's writers from Holovko and Vasyl'chenko to Nestaiko, Hutsalo, Blyznets' and Komar. "Powerful in its humanitarian tenor, rich in its links with folklore, the Ukrainian children's book is, fortunately, far from presenting a simplified and merely entertaining picture of the world; it is, moreover, devoid of the morbidity and horrors which can corrupt the soul of the child," says Kostiuchenko who is director of Veselka publishers in Kyiv. About children's books published by Veselka the author says: "We produce about 250 titles of books in editions of up to 36 million copies..." As an example, he mentions Natalia Zabila whose works, says Kostiuchenko, "were published in Ukraine 200 times in editions totaling 12 million copies." The article is illustrated in color with title pages and illustrations from Ukrainian children's books by Platon Voronko, Iaroslav Stel'makh and Valentyn Bychko.

A723. Kostiuchenko, Viktor. "When the hero is fictional." / Victor Kostyuchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.10 (October 1968): 20- 22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Robitnycha hazeta. (6 September 1968): 2].

About Volodymyr Drozd and his latest novel "Katastrofa" published in Vitchyzna (2/1968). According to Kostiuchenko, in Drozd's works "... the exceptional personality of the hero, as a rule, is in conflict with the masses and with his own environment". Kostiuchenko considers Drozd to be an "interesting but artistically uneven" writer who in "Katastrofa" "does not take any social stand..." and was unable "to create full-blooded images and present a true picture of our contemporary way of life..." Says Kostiuchenko: "The conflict of the individual with the masses, based on superiority, exceptionality and supremacy is not taken from life. It does not represent the character of our social existence, our morals and our principles... the author has created a false background for the hero for the sake of opposition between him and his surroundings." The Digest's title reads: "Writer gets April-plenum treatment for novel published in February". With a note from the Digest's editors.

A724. "Kostiuk, Hryhory, 1902- (Borys Podoliak)." Contemporary Authors. 77-80 (1979): 314.

Half-a-page of biobibliographical data about the literary scholar and critic Hryhorii Kostiuk (born 1902) who wrote occasionally also under the pseudonym Borys Podoliak. The data, supplied by the author himself, are arranged, as is the custom in Contemporary Authors, in the following categories: personal, career, membership in organizations, writings, work in progress, biographical and critical sources.

A725. Kostyrko, S. "Pages from Ukrainian poetry". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.12 (December 1976): 24-25. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 October 1976): 4].

A brief note about the 17th issue of the almanac Poeziia. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian works highlighted in poetry almanac."

A726. "Kostyuk, Yuriy Grigorevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 306.

Thirty-three lines of bio-bibliographical data about the critic and playwright Iurii Kostiuk (born 1910).

A727. "Kosynka (real name: Strelets) Grigoriy Mikhaylovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 304.

Bio-bibliographical data (14 lines) about Hryhorii Kosynka, short story writer, born 17 November 1899, executed by firing squad 17 December 1934.

A728. "Kotsyuba, Gordey Maksimovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 305.

Thirteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about Hordii Kotsiuba, born 15 January 1892, died in prison 22 March 1939.

A729. Koval, Vitalii. "Home of poetic encounters." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.6 (June 1968): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1968): 3].

About a small bookstore devoted exclusively to poetry books. The bookstore is called "Poeziia" and has been in existence in Kyiv at the corner of Lenin and Pushkin Streets. Koval discusses the great demand for certain authors - a demand the bookstore is frequently unable to satisfy. As an example, he quotes Vira Bilenko, the manager of the book store, about the latest poetry collection by Ivan Drach. "300 copies sold in two hours. We had ordered 3,000 but were informed in no uncertain terms, that these were unavailable. Only a small number had been published." The Digest's supplied title for this article reads: "They try harder: a visit to Kiev's poetry bookstore."

A730. Koval, Vitalii. "Our talent and labors for the party and the people: reports and election meeting of the writers' party organization of Kiev." / V. Koval. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.1 (January 1974): 15-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 December 1973): 1-2].

B. Chalyy, party committee secretary, according to this report, reviewed the achievements of the last three years, criticized the writers for not "fully meeting the demands posed upon our literature by the party" and for the fact that "too few of our works deal with the theme of our own times on a high ideological and artistical level and eulogize our heroic working class and collective farm peasantry". Ie. Hutsalo and Borys Kharchuk were singled out for adverse comments. The discussion that followed included comments on the speech by V. Shcherbyyts'kyi at the April Plenum of the CC CPSU. Iurii Bedzyk, V. Drozd, O. Levada, V. Brovchenko, V. Kozachenko took part in the discussion. the Digest's title: "Kiev writers' party organization meets."

A731. "Kovalenko, Boris L'vovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 305-306.

The literary historian and critic Borys Kovalenko was born 25 November 1903 and died in prison 24 August 1938. (15 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A732. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Builders of bridges of brotherhood." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.4 (April 1972): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (10 March 1972): 2].

About Estonian translations of Ukrainian literature and particularly about the work of Harald Rajamets who has translated into Estonian Shevchenko's Kobzar, Pervomais'kyi's short stories, V. Bezorud'ko's novella "Try mushketery z Sukhykh Mlyntsiv" (1964), the poetry of Maksym Ryl's'kyi and Lesia Ukrainka, short stories of Ievhen Hutsalo. The sizes of Estonian editions of translated literature "can also be envied", says Kovalenko. He cites the following examples: Honchar's Tronka in Estonian was published in an edition of 24,000 copies, Pervomais'kyi's Dykyi med - 30,000 copies; Dovzhenko's Poema pro more - 20,000 copies; Natalia Zabila's Pro Vsikh - 40,000 copies; Bezorud'ko's Try mushketery - 18,000 copies.

The Digest's title: "Ukrainian literature in Estonia."

A733. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Dol'd-Mikhailik, Iurii Petrovich" / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 344. Biblio.

Iurii Dol'd-Mykhailyk (1903-1966) was the author of short stories, sketches, adventure novels and screenplays (21 lines).

A734. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Golovko, Andrei Vasil'evich." / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 258-259. Biblio.

An article of 35 lines about Andrii Holovko (born 1897). According to Kovalenko, "Golovko's prose is characterized by a profound understanding of social processes and of the psychology of his heroes, by lyricism, and by a rich linguistic palette."

A735. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Malyshko, Andrei Samoilovich" / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 15 (1977): 397. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 41 lines about Andrii Malyshko (1912-1970). Says Kovalenko: "Malyshko's poetry is closely linked to Ukrainian folklore; it is romantically elevated and musical."

A736. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Pervomaiskii, Leonid Solomonovich (pen name of Il'ia Shlemovich Gurevich)." / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 19 (1978): 472-473. Biblio.

Leonid Pervomais'kyi (1908-1973), says Kovalenko, "... portrayed the heroism of the class struggle during the Civil War of 1918-20, the enthusiasm for building socialism, and the romance of everyday Komsomol life..." In Pervomais'kyi's later poetry written in the 1960's and 1970's Kovalenko detects "a deeper philosophical comprehension of reality". (33 lines).

A737. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Zabila, Natal'ia L'vovna" / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 9 (1975): 544.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines + biblio) about the Soviet Ukrainian children's writer Natalia Zabila (b.1903).

A738. Kovalenko, Leonid. "Zagrebel'nyi, Pavel Arkhipovich" / L.N. Kovalenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 9 (1975): 550.

About the novelist Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi (b.1924; 19 lines + biblio). "For the most part his prose works, which have intriguing plots, are devoted to contemporary life; in many of his works the heroic events of the war years are portrayed", says Kovalenko about Zahrebel'nyi.

A739. "Kovalenko, Leonid." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 52-53.

About dissident activities of Leonid Kovalenko, a literary critic born 1922. (14 lines).

A740. "Kovalenko, Leonid Nikolaevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 309.

Bio-bibliographical data about the poet and critic Leonid Kovalenko (born 1922) (22 lines).

A741. "Kovinka, Aleksandr Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 312.

Oleksandr Kovin'ka was a Ukrainian humorist, born 1900. (31 lines).

A742. "Kovtun, Ivan Dmitriyevich (pen names: Yuriy Vukhnal, Ivan Ukhnal). Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 306.

Bio-bibliographical data about the humorist Iukhym (Iurii) Vukhnal', born 5 October 1906, died in prison 15 July 1937. (8 lines).

A743. Kovtunenko, Anatolii. "Panch, Petro (pen name of Petr Iosifovich Panchenko)." / A.A. Kovtunenko. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 19 (1978): 204-205. Biblio.

The novelist Petro Panch (real name Panchenko) was born in 1891 and died in 1978. According to Kovtunenko, the main theme of his works is "the formation of character during the period of the revolution and socialist reconstruction."

A744. Kovych, V. "From a race of traitors." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.8 (August 1969): 22-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 July 1969): 4].

An attack on John Kolasky, author of Education in Soviet Ukraine [cf. B044], a book which is characterized as "slanderous exercises". "Kolasky has died a moral death by betraying the interests of his party, many subversive actions in Ukraine, and dishonest appearances in his homeland", says Kovych. The Digest's title: "Kolasky reviled in Literaturna Ukraina."

A745. "Kozachenko, Vasilii Pavlovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 626. Biblio.

Vasyl' Kozachenko, "Soviet Ukrainian writer", was born in 1913. (23 lines).

A746. "Kozachenko, Vasilii Pavlovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 313.

Forty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Vasyl' Kozachenko (born 1913).

A747. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "At the 6th Congress of Writers of the USSR. Speech of Vasyl Kozachenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.8 (August 1976): 16-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 June 1976): 1-2].

Kozachenko speaks of recent achievements of Soviet Ukrainian literature and singles out, among other works and authors, the novels Tsyklon and Bereh liubovi by Honchar, Z pohliadu vichnosti and Rozhin by Zahrebel'nyi and Lebedyna zhraia by Zemliak. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian writers at 6th Writers Congress. Kozachenko gives progress report on Ukrainian literature".

A748. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "Concerning work with creative youth: report of First Secretary of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine Vasyl' Kozachenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 [sic, i.e.5] (May 1977): 12-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (25 March 1977): 3].

Kozachenko spoke at the Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine on 17 March. He called attention to the resolution of the CC CPSU "On work with creative youth" which he characterized as "yet another brilliant testament to party's constant solicitude for the training of a new literary generation." He stressed the need to improve "the ideological- creative tempering of young writers". The Digest's title: "Kozachenko on work with young writers."

A749. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "Friendship in action". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.2 (February 1973): 23-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 December 1972): 1].

Kozachenko warns about the "most subtle ploys" used by enemies "to ensnare inexperienced and untempered people" which, in his view, "range from attacks against socialist realism to realism without limits, including militant political indifference, so-called complete 'freedom' of creativity, and the artist's total 'independence' from the people." Kozachenko castigates nationalism, Zionism and chauvinism, but praises "the literary classics of the Russian people [which] always have and continue to serve as good models" for Ukrainian writers and the Russian language "which has become the language of unity and friendship in Soviet society". The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Fear inexperienced people fall prey to enemy ploys."

A750. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "In creative cooperation."/ V. Kozachenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 35-36. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 May 1973): 3].

Kozachenko spoke at the joint meeting of the creative unions on 22 May. He said, among other things: "Our main tasks are precise and clear - to write, as was stated during the 24th Congress of the CPSU, works that are worthy of the feats of our nation, to write books which elucidate, propagate and defend our Soviet way of life, which fight for the triumph of communist ideals. All the activity of our unions, the ideological-organizational and ideological-creative work has to be subordinated to this noble goal..." The Digest's title: "Approve future joint measures of creative unions."

A751. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "Learn from life, create for the people. Speech by the First Secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine, V.P. Kozachenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 6-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (12 April 1974): 1-3].

The Digest's title reads: "Kozachenko cautions literary novices against political indifference." "There can be no superior craftsmanship without a profound principle- mindedness. There can be no profound principle-mindedness without superior craftsmanship", says Kozachenko.

A752. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "The principal direction of literature". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.7 (July 1974): 19-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (4 June 1974): 1-2].

Among "interesting literary undertakings worthy of active support" Kozachenko names Zemni zori, collections of artistic-documentary essays about the heroes of the latest five- year plan published annually by Radians'kyi pys'mennyk. He is pleased with literary patronage of important construction sites by literary journals. Among the larger artistic works on the labor theme, he praises Z pohliadu vichnosti and Perekhodymo do liubovi by P. Zahrebel'nyi, Pochesnyi lehion and Lykhobor by V. Sobko, Vsim smertnym na zlo by V. Tytov, Na krutii dorozi and Nadiia by Iakiv Bash, Khvyli by Iu. Zbanats'kyi, Kanal by I. Hryhurko, Myt' vertannia by O. Vasyl'kivs'kyi and Kraplyna i more by A. Moskalenko. On the other hand, V. Kysel'ov's Veselyi roman, O. Bylinov's Sady and Iu. Khmel'kovs'kyi's Sukhyi lyman are criticised as depicting "the working life in a simplistic manner and frequently from a philistine standpoint." The Digest's title: "Kozachenko on the worker theme in literature".

A753. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "The road to great literature." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.5 (May 1972): 11-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 March 1972): 1-2].

Kozachenko addressed the Second Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. He spoke about "the rapid influx of young people into literature", the task of educating the future literary generation and, what he called, the "unfortunate and inconceivable" errors of an ideological nature which cannot be tolerated. "Ideologically harmful writings," says Kozachenko, "sometimes find their way abroad, where the[y] are exploited by the inveterate enemies of the Soviet state for purposes of malicious slander against the policies of our Party." The Digest's title: "Kozachenko scores authors whose works are published abroad."

A754. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "Sacred duty, lofty calling." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.7 (July 1968): 15-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 May 1968): 1].

Kozachenko calls on young writers not to provide material for bourgeois propaganda by writing "apolitical verses, far removed from contemporaneity", by creating characters who are "colorless and impoverished" or "preoccupied with the 'family hearth'...", etc. Says Kozachenko: "Rulers of the 'free world' with the tenacity of spiders, weave webs of hypocrisy and falsehood... Treacherous 'sympathizers' of Ukrainian literature are too concerned with the creative output of our young writers. Their interest in our young writers' mistakes and political indifference is no secret... As soon as they lay their hands on something that suits them, bourgeois 'interpreters' pour out insincere epithets and eagerly reprint the works resorting to all manner of perverted interpretation, distortion and outright falsification!" The Digest's title reads: "Kozachenko spins 'spider web theory' on subversion among Ukraine's literati."

A755. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "7th [Seventh] Congress of Ukraine's writers. The literature of the age of developed socialism. Report of First Secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine Vasyl' Kozachenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 16-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (16 April 1976): 3-5].

As proof of "indisputable attainments" of Soviet Ukrainian literature, Kozachenko provides a listing of new works by Soviet Ukrainian authors on such themes as labor and village life, problems of science and society, "moral problems of our times", "glorification of Soviet patriotism and internationalism accompanied by the exposure of the bourgeois way of life and the ideology of anti-Communism", etc. There are also critical notes in his report, e.g about the mediocre level of Ukrainian humorous prose, and what he calls "oversights and serious errors" in the literary journals Literaturna Ukraina, Vitchyzna, Zhovten', Prapor.

A756. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "Speech by Vasyl Kozachenko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.8 (August 1971): 11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (2 July 1971): 3].

Kozachenko spoke at the Fifth All-Union Congress of Writers in Moscow. "All worthwhile literature published in the 75 languages of the peoples of the USSR," said Kozachenko, "must be translated into Russian. For the majority of literatures this signifies an entry into the world." He also called for the Russian Literaturnaia gazeta "to consider itself to be more all-Union..." The Digest's title: "Kozachenko suggests Literaturnaya Gazeta become an all- union literary newspaper."

A757. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "There is no greater happiness." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.8 (August 1973): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (6 July 1973): 1].

Kozachenko reports on the forthcoming publication of literary works about workers, construction sites and factories, as well as on writers' visits to such enterprizes in search of materials and ideas. This follows the directives of the 5th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of the USSR and of the 6th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. The Digest's title: "Kozachenko describes writers' contacts with workers."

A758. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "The traditions of the first congress live on." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.10 (October 1974): 16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (10 September 1974): 1].

Various anti-Soviet "sovietologists", says Kozachenko, use as their principal weapon the dissemination of "militant apoliticism", "kindling of old group sentiment passions" and "petty theories expressed by various national-deviationists and national revisionists." The Digest's title: "Kozachenko warns writers against manifesting group sentiments."

A759. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. [Untitled]. / Vasil Kozachenko. Tr. by Hilda Perham. Soviet Literature. 12 (297) (1972): 152-153.

Kozachenko answers the Soviet Literature questionnaire sent to a number of Soviet writers on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the USSR. The question was: "How do your national culture and you personally benefit from the artistic experience of the Soviet Union as a whole?"

Says Vasyl' Kozachenko: "... everything is tightly intervowen, 'fused'. Everything has become 'ours', 'Soviet', our common wealth and pride." ...We "live in a country where the highest achievements of fraternal literatures are not merely the national pride of a single people but at the same time part of the cultural wealth of all the nationalities of our homeland."

A760. Kozachenko, Vasyl'. "The writer - a dedicated and active participant in communist construction." Address by Vasyl' Kozachenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.5 (May 1973): 11-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (27 March 1973): 1-2].

Kozachenko, the newly elected first secretary of the Executive Board, spoke at the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine on the 23rd of March. He listed a number of works published in the last two years, that, in his opinion,"deserve our praise and full support", but he also singled out for harsh criticism such authors as Roman Andriashyk (for the novel Poltva), Ivan Bilyk (for the novel Mech Areia), Oles' Berdnyk, Hryhorii Kochur and Iryna Zhylenko (the latter for lyrical poetry published in the journal Vitchyzna). In Kozachenko's view, there is a need "to further elevate the role of the writer, the propagandizer of party directives, the inspired bard of socialist triumphs, norm and mode of Soviet life, the active and dedicated fighter against any manifestations of such enemy ideologies as nationalism, chauvinism or Zionism..." and to "repulse all manifestations of liberalism, political indifference, and extra-class esthetic approaches to artistic phenomena." The Digest's title: "Kozachenko's maiden speech: an all-out attack on deviations from party directives".

A761. Kozak, Ihor. "Sosyura's Love Ukraine: twenty-fifth anniversary of the famous poem." Forum. 8 (Spring 1969): 12.

"Sosyura is best known for his poem "Love Ukraine' chiefly because the Pravda newspaper in Moscow strongly condemned it," says Kozak. "To Americans and Canadians... it is unbelievable that a poem could be the subject of such a bitter attack..." According to this article, "After 'Love Ukraine' was written in 1944, it was reprinted many times and also translated into several Russian versions. Russian versions often 'improved' Sosyura's poem by changing the original and even by adding stanzas... Pravda condemned the poem on July 2, 1951 as 'ideologically defective' and said that 'the poet's words, grossly distorting the true facts, sound openly nationalistic'." Kozak characterizes Sosiura's "Liubit' Ukrainu" as "a famous but hardly a great poem"; in his view, "apart from its primary purpose of instilling patriotic fervour in the Ukrainians during World War II, the poem has only a few striking lyrical lines and stanzas." The English translation of the poem is printed in the same issue on p. 13. [cf. T384].

A762. "Kozlaniuk, Petr Stepanovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 631.

A bio-bibliographical note (20 lines + bibliography) about Petro Kozlaniuk (1904-1965). "In his short storties, lampoons and feuilletons, he painted pictures of the difficult life of the poor in Galician villages," says this unsigned entry.

A763. "Kozlanyuk, Pyotr Stepanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 307.

Twenty-five lines of bio-bibliographical data about Petro Kozlaniuk (b. 1904, d.March 1965).

A764. "Krasivsky adapted by AI." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.2 [i.e.23.2] (Summer 1976): 87.

Madison Group of Amnesty International in New York has adopted the poet Zynovii Krasivs'kyi as one of its prisoners of conscience.

A765. "Krasivskyi, Zinoviy Mykhaylovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 54.

Dissident activities and imprisonment of the poet Zynovii Krasivs'kyi (17 lines).

A766. Krasovsky, Yuri. "Sergei Eisenstein and Alexander Dovzhenko." Soviet Film. 1 (140) (1969): 26. illus.

About Dovzhenko's meetings and relations with Sergei Eisenstein based on memoirs and correspondence between the two.

A767. "Kravchenko, Fedor Tikhonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 320.

Bio-bibliographical data (32 lines) about the writer Fedir Kravchenko, born 1906.

A768. "Kravchenko, Yevgenii Sergeevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 321.

Ievhen Kravchenko was a writer, playwright and literary critic. (41 lines).

A769. Kravchuk, Petro. "Louis Riel in Ukrainian literature." / Peter Krawchuk. Ukrainian Canadian. 23.524 (18) (May 1970): 71-73. illus.

According to Kravchuk, "the period of the Indian and Metis struggles in Western Canada led by Louis "David" Riel during the years 1870-1885 found its reflection in the work of a number of Ukrainian writers." Kravchuk focuses on Myroslav Irchan, Ivan Kulyk and Rostislav Bratun. Irchan lived in Canada in 1924-29 and wrote such stories as "The death of Asnar", "Smoked fish", the poem "Unemployed" and articles on the "Canadian Ukraine". Ivan Kulyk was consul of the USSR in Canada in 1924-26. His article about Riel was published in the literary journal Hart in 1927; his story "The 14th pipe" appeared in 1931 in Chervonyi Shliakh. An excerpt of this story appears in the same issue [cf. T207]; eight lines from Kulyk's poem "The prairie" beginning "Riel, Riel! You're one big contradiction" are quoted in the article in an unattributed translation. Rostyslav Bratun has a "Canadian book" of poetry and Kravchuk mentions especially "A poem about eternal hope", "Red roses on the Red River", "Window of civilization". Five lines of Bratun's poem beginning "The free spirit will not perish" are quoted in the article.

A770. Kravchuk, Petro. "Sons of the Soil - a literary epic." / Peter Krawchuk. Ukrainian Canadian. 22.512 (6) (April 1969): 38-39. port.

About Illia Kyriiak [Kiriak], with his portrait. Includes a review of the writer's trilogy Syny zemli [Sons of the Soil]. Says Kravchuk: Sons of the Soil is still the only literary work in which the life of Ukrainian settlers in Canada is so broadly and thoroughly embraced over a period of several decades." According to Kravchuk, "The weakest side of the trilogy is the social and economic life of the Canadian community"..."the writer completely ignores the role of the farm unions." Chapter 5 of Sons of the Soil appears in the same issue on pp.40-46 [cf. T210].

A771. Kravchuk, Petro. "Ukrainian women in early history." / Peter Krawchuk. Ukrainian Canadian. 24.545 (38) (March 1972): 15-19. illus., port.

The article marks the 50th anniversary of the first branch of the Women's section of the Ukrainian Labour Temple Association in Winnipeg, which was a forerunner of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians. Kravchuk discusses, in addition to Canadian Ukrainian women, Ukrainian women-writers Natalia Kobrynska, Ievheniia Iaroshynska, Olha Kobylianska, Uliana Kravchenko.

A772. Kravchuk, Petro. "Upton Sinclair and Ukraine." / Peter Krawchuk. Ukrainian Canadian. 22.510 (4) (February 1969): 11-13. illus., ports.

About the American writer Upton Sinclair, Ukrainian translations of his works and the correspondence of Upton Sinclair with Myroslav Irchan. With b/w portraits of both Sinclair and Irchan. Irchan's articles about Upton Sinclair and reviews of his books were published in the 1920's in such Ukrainian journals as Vsesvit, Chervonyi Shliakh, Pluzhanyn, Kino.

A773. Kravchuk, Petro. "Wasyl Stefanyk and the Ukrainian heritage in Canada" / Peter Krawchuk. Ukrainian Canadian. 23.535 (567) (May 1971): 84-97.

Emigration of Ukrainians to Canada, as it is reflected in Vasyl Stefanyk's literary works and in his letters to Ol'ha Kobylians'ka, Viktor Hamorak, W. Moraczewski and others.

A774. Kravtsiv, Bohdan. "Literature and literary criticism in the diaspora." / Bohdan Krawciw. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 46-49. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read on 14 December 1972 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, a Ukrainian poet, translator and literary critic, presented a bibliographic survey of the current state of Ukrainian émigré literary activity which - in his view - is made more difficult by the absence of satisfactory bibliographic publications and a greater concern with literary politics and history rather than literary criticism per se.

A775. Kravtsiv, Bohdan. "The period of Renaissance and humanism in Ukrainian literature." / Bohdan J. Krawciw. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. 4 (1973-1974): 86-88. Biblio.

A summary of a paper presented on May 9, 1974 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed some recent studies which "have helped establish that Ukrainian literature of the thirteenth to sixteenth centuries included highly original works, sometimes written in Polish and Latin, which formed a base for the Ukrainian Baroque literature of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries."

A776. "Krawciw library donated to Harvard University." Forum. 39 (Spring/Summer 1978): 35. illus.

Bohdan Kravtsiv (1904-1975), was a Ukrainian poet, scholar, journalist and book collector. His collection of 12,000 volumes was donated, after his death, to the libraries of Harvard University. A special ceremony was held on 5 May 1978 to mark the occasion. The unsigned note is illustrated with the Kravtsiv bookplate designed by Jacques Hnizdovsky.

A777. "Krotevich, Yevgeniy Maksimovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 324.

Writer and playwright Ievhen Krotevych was born 1884 and died 1968. (40 lines).

A778. Krugovoy, George. "Evolution of a metaphor in Old Russian literature." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.1 (Spring 1972): 57-75.

The author discusses "the metaphor of battle as a feast" - where "knights engaged in battle serve a wine of blood to the enemy - in Slovo o polku Ihorevim and in Povest o razorenii Riazani Batyem. Krugovoy takes issue with D. Likhachov's hypothesis that the "battle-feast metaphor grew out of the pagan Slav funeral rite (trizna)." According to Krugovoy, these metaphors "do not mean death in battle but the battle itself..." "War and battles possess in the ethos of military aristocratic societies a positive and affirmative value. They contribute to the personal honour and glory of a knight and his seigneur. This concept of war and battles is clearly present both in Slovo o polku Igoreve and Povest o razorenii Riazani Batyem..." says the author. "...to fill the cups and serve wine", in Krugovoy's view, does not mean to die in battle, but to 'drink the cup'... does. To be sure, the formula of 'drinking the cup' does not appear in Slovo o polku Igoreve... but it is used several times in Povest o razorenii Riazani Batyem, a military lay written more than fifty years after the epic tale of Igor's defeat was composed." One page abstract of the article in French appears on p.75.

A779. Krugovoy, George. "A motif from Old Russian Vita Sanctorum in Arthurian romance." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 15.3 (Autumn 1973): 351-373.

A comparative study of an episode in La Queste del Saint Graal and "the story of the murder of Prince Boris by the henchmen of his brother Svyatopolk" as "told in three main texts - the hagiographic Chtenie by Nestor, the anonymous Skazaniye, and the report in the Chronicle under the year 1015". The author's hypothesis is as follows: "...the story of Boris's and Gleb's martyrdom could have become known in Early Medieval Western Europe... at the end of the XIIth century, when the anonymous Cistercian monk was writing his Queste, the Vita of Boris and Gleb could have been known to him. The structural comparison of narrative patterns reveals similarities which are not accidental. The cultural and historical evidence makes the probability of a genetic similarity between the story of Boris in the Old Russian Vita and that of the Bors-Lionel conflict in the Queste almost a certainty." The French summary of the article appears on p. 374.

A780. Krugovoy, George. "A Norman legal formula in Russian Chronicles and Slovo o polku Igoreve." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 11.4 (Winter 1969): 497-514.

The author traces the Norman formula "I (we) cannot resurrect him (them)..." through Chanson de Roland, Nibelungenlied, Slovo o polku Ihorevim and Kyivan Chronicles and attempts to answer the question: "...why in both epic monuments of European mediaeval literature - the French Chanson de Roland and the Russian Slovo o polku Igoreve - the formula of reconciliation is invariably followed either by the tale of vengeance or by the call to revenge". Krugovoy claims that it is "precisely because of its conciliatory meaning" [that] "this formula could be employed for the purposes of artistic contrast." "...if elevated to an aesthetic plane," says Krugovoy, "this formula could, by the force of its newly acquired artistic and emotional impact, help to convey certain messages which would ring in the ears of listeners or in the mind of readers, reminding them of certain values or duties within the socio-political framework and code of ethics of European mediaeval civilization."

A781. "Krushel'nitskii, Anton Vladislavovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976):526. Biblio.

Says this unsigned 19-line bio-bibliographical note about Antin Krushel'nyts'kyi: "His works reflect the difficult working conditions in the Western Ukraine and depict the workers' participation in the social struggle."

A782. "Krushel'nitskiy, Anton Vladislavovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 320.

Bio-bibliographical data (17 lines) about the writer Antin Krushel'nyts'kyi, born 4 August 1878, died in prison 13 November 1941.

A783. "Krushel'nitskiy, Ivan Antonovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 320.

Twelve lines of bio-bibliographical data about Ivan Krushel'nyts'kyi, poet and playwright, born 12 November 1905, died in imprisonment 17 December 1934.

A784. "Krutikova, Nina Yevgenevna." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 325-326.

Forty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about Nina Krutikova, literary critic born 1913.

A785. "Krymskii, Agafangel Efimovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 532.

Ahafanhel Kryms'kyi (1871-1942) is characterized by this note as a "Soviet Ukrainian writer, scholar and Orientalist." (22 lines).

A786. "Krymskiy, Agafangel Yefimovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 322.

Bio-bibliographical data of 37 lines about the historian, philologist, orientalist, poet Ahafanhel Kryms'kyi (b.15 January 1871, d.25 January 1942).

A787. "Kryvda, Grigoriy Fedoseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 328.

Thirty lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet and writer Hryhorii Kryvda. (b.1923).

A788. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Bash, Iakov Vasil'evich." / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 3 (1973): 43. Biblio.

An 18-line bio-bibliographical note about the writer Iakiv Bash, born 1908.

A789. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Bazhan, Mikola." / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 2 (1973): 657. Biblio.

A one-half page encyclopedic article about Mykola Bazhan, born 1904. Says Kryzhanivs'kyi about the poet: "His early works show the influence of futurism, and later, expressionism... From the early 1930's, Bazhan affirmed socialist humanism, devotion to ideals and party passion in art... By liberating himself from the complexity of poetic images in his verses and narrative poems, Bazhan attained profundity of thought in combination with simplicity and clarity of poetic form."

A790. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Boichenko, Aleksandr Maksimovich" / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 3 (1973): 405-406.

A twenty-line note about Oleksandr Boichenko (1903-1950) who is characterized as "Soviet Ukrainian writer and public figure" who wrote both in Ukrainian and Russian.

A791. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Kopylenko, Aleksandr Ivanovich" / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 378. Biblio.

A 20-line bio-bibliographical note about Oleksandr Kopylenko (1900-1958), author of short stories and novels, as well as a number of children's books.

A792. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Kulik, Ivan Iulianovich" / S. A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13(1976): 558-559. Biblio.

The poet Ivan Kulyk (1897-1941) spent some time in the U.S. and Canada. Kryzhanivs'kyi characterizes his poetry as "civic and internationalist" and says: "An important theme is the depiction of capitalist reality in America. The narrative poem "A Black Epic" (1929) deals with the struggle of American Negroes for civil rights." (24 lines).

A793. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Nekhoda, Ivan Ivanovich" / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 418. Biblio.

"Nekhoda's lyrical and narrative poems reflect the attitudes of his contemporaries..." says Kryzhanivs'kyi. "Much of his poetry was written for children." Ivan Nekhoda was born in 1910 and died in 1963. (18 lines).

A794. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Novichenko, Leonid Nikolaevich" / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 18 (1978): 306. biblio.

Leonid Novychenko, born in 1914, is characterized as a "Soviet literary scholar and critic" who has written works on socialist realism, the history of Ukrainian literature, "as well as studies on the interrelation of the literatures of the peoples of the USSR..." (20 lines).

A795. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "On the highway of our age. Reflections on contemporary poetry." / Stepan Kryzhanivs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Unkrainian Press. 11.11 (November 1967): 10-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna. 8 (August 1967): 129-138].

"...In the 1960s," says Kryzhanivs'kyi, "the art of poetry leads a vigorous existence". He claims that between 150 and 200 collections of poetry are published in Ukraine every year. Kryzhanivs'kyi speaks of recent creative tendencies, such as the stress on the value and uniqueness of the individual, greater intensity of ethical and psychological themes, the growth of aesthetic devices used by poets, the arrival of a new generation of poets who "have taken strong root in our poetic life". He also mentions the short-lived "movement of opposition and 'nihilism'" and the spread of "real hack writing and graphomania". Criticism, says Kryzhanivs'kyi, "must show the public the difference between true poetry and hollow-ringing verse fabrication." The Digest's suplied title reads: "Critic speaks out on poetry."

A796. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "On the interpretation of the literary process of the 1920's-30s."/ S.A. Kryzhanivs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.9 (September 1974): 14-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo. 1 (January 1974): 42-52].

Kryzhanivs'kyi takes issue with critics who, in his words, made "attempts to 'change the history of Soviet Ukrainian literature by means of rehabilitating a number of works and ideologically erroneous tendencies and by means of reappraising the role of individual literary organizations (this is done with particular frequency in the case of 'Vaplite' and the neoclassicists)." Such tendencies, according to Kryzhanivs'kyi, are evident in the volumes 6, 7 and 8 of the history of Ukrainian literature (1970-72), in Vasyl' Iaremenko's [Yaremenko's] foreword to the works of Mykola Kulish [Tvory. Kyiv: Molod, 1968], in B. Antonenko- Davydovych's article about H. Kosynka in a book of recollections about Kosynka ["About Hryhorii Kosynka", Kyiv: Radians'kyi pys'mennyk, 1969, p.38], in B. Antonenko-Davydovych's self-rehabilitation of his own novel Smert'; in Liubomyr Senyk's comments on the first edition of Holovko's novel Maty [Kyiv: Radians'kyi pys'mennyk, 1963]; in M. Matviychuk's and M. Parkhomenko's high evaluation of Ianovs'kyi's [Yanovs'kyy's] novel Chotyry shabli [in the journal Zhovten', no.8, 1972 and in Obnovleniie tradytsii]; in idealizing the writers from the Borot'bist party: V. Ellan, V. Chumak, A. Zalyvchyi [Zalyvchyy], H. Mykhailychenko [H. Mykhaylychenko]., S. Zarudnyi [Zarudnyy] [M.D. Rodko: Ukrains'ka poeziia pershykh pozhovtnevykh rokiv. Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1971; V.I. Pivtoradni. Ukrains'ka literatura pershykh rokiv revoliutsii (1917-1923 rr. Kyiv: Radians'ka shkola, 1968].

A797. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Ryl'skii, Maksim Fadeevich" / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 22 (1979): 524-525. Biblio.

Maksym Ryl's'kyi (1895-1964), according to Kryzhanivs'kyi, "was a master of strict poetic forms, for example, the sonnet, tercet, and octave, and of stanzaic verse in general. His work is characterized by a striving for clarity and simplicity of expression, melodiousness, richness of vocabulary, and an abundance of rhythms and intonational patterns... He also did prolific work in the field of literary scholarship, linguistics, folklore studies, and art criticism." (48 lines).

A798. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Ukrainian literature today" / Stepan Krizhanivsky. Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 4, 15. col. illus.

According to Kryzhanivs'kyi, "Soviet Ukrainian literature today is highly developed and possesses a broad range of styles, forms and genres", it has had "some great and lasting successes" during "the 60 odd years of the new socialist era". He characterizes this literature as being innovative and optimistic and devoted to high ideals of morality, patriotism and the "humanitarian essence of modern Soviet life". "Issues of the present day occupy a leading place in it, since very many subjects, plots and settings are adapted from the life of workers, farmers and intellectuals", says Kryzhanivs'kyi. In addition to "the classical heritage of Soviet Ukrainian belles lettres" represented by such names as Tychyna, Ryl's'kyi, Holovko, Ianovs'kyi, Dovzhenko and Korniichuk, Kryzhanivs'kyi singles out as "the fame and hope of Ukrainian letters today" the poets B. Oliinyk, I. Drach, D. Pavlychko, the prose writers M. Stel'makh, O. Honchar, P. Zahrebel'nyi and Ie. Hutsalo and the playwrights Mykola Zarudnyi and Oleksii Kolomiiets'.

A799. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "'The Ulyanovs' and its author." / Stepan Kryzhanovsky. Soviet Literature. 4 (277) (1971): 66-67. port. of Kanivets'.

An article about Volodymyr Kanivets' and his novel "Ulianovy", an excerpt of which is published in the same issue [cf. T157]. According to Kryzhanivs'kyi, Kanivets' has been working on the Lenin theme for about twenty years and has previously published a biographical novel "Alexander Ulyanov" about Lenin's older brother (1961). Ulianovy, which was awarded the Ukrainian SSR's Shevchenko Prize in 1971, says Kryzhanivs'kyi, "although based on documents, is not a kind of family chronicle or a collection of biographiocal details. It is a novel, a work of literature, which presents a vast gallery of historical personages against a broad social background... In the multinational literature about Lenin, Kanivets's books certainly occupy a leading place."

A800. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Voron'ko, Platon Nikitovich". / S.A Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 5 (1974): 600. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 21 lines about the poet Platon Voron'ko, born in 1913. According to Kryzhanivs'kyi, Voron'ko's poems are "optimistic in tone", "have a vivid national coloration" and deal mostly with "the life of young people, the struggle for peace, the friendship of peoples and socialist construction".

A801. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Vsesvit." / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 5 (1974): 628.

An 11-line note about the journal published in Kharkiv in 1925-1934 and about its continuation published since 1958 in Kyiv. According to Kryzhanivs'kyi, Vsesvit publishes foreign literature in translation, critical reviews, publicistic material, photographic reports and a chronicle of cultural life abroad, and had in 1970 a circulation of more than 50,000 copies.

A802. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Vyrgan, Ivan Anikeevich". / S.A. Kryzhanovskii. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 5 (1974): 641. Biblio.

A note of 11 lines about Ivan Vyrhan (b.1908), "Soviet Ukrainian poet" who, according to Kryzhanivs'kyi, "praises the new Socialist Ukraine".

A803. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Yevhen Kyrylyuk -75." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 [sic, i.e.5] (May 1977): 19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (18 March 1977): 3].

A tribute to the literary scholar Ievhen Kyryliuk on the occasion of his 75th birthday. Kryzhanivs'kyi lists the most important scholarly contributions of Kyryliuk: he was the editor of the Shevchenko dictionary, of the eight-volume history of Ukrainian literature, of the 50-volume edition of Franko as well as of numerous other important publications. Kyryliuk, according to this article, has written hundreds of works on Shevchenko - books and articles, as well as studies of many other Ukrainian writers, and he has influenced entire generations of scholars specializing in Ukrainian literary history. The Digest's title: "Shevchenko scholar Ye. Kyrylyuk honored on 75th birthday."

A804. Kryzhanivs'kyi, Stepan. "Young Ukrainian poets." / Stepan Kryzhanovsky. Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (1973): 177-179.

The article discusses the poetry of Ivan Drach, Vitalii Korotych [Vitali Korotich], Vasyl' Symonenko [Vasil Simonenko], Borys Oliinyk [Boris Oleinik] and Mykola Vinhranovs'kyi [Mikola Vingranovsky] who - in the author's view - "brought into Ukrainian poetry the new themes, motifs of a generation which did not take part in the war but clearly remembered it..." The common characteristic traits of this group, according to Kryzhanivs'kyi, are "the irreconcilability of them all to provincial narrow-mindedness, to stagnation of thought and to mediocrity, their enhanced sense of social and national dignity..." He gives brief characterizations for each poet: Drach introduced "new elements into the traditional forms of ballad and elegy and new notes of a philosophical nature into meditative lyrics", he is a "poet of ample talent, powerful thought" with "a keen feeling for words" and "original imagery"; Symonenko: a "poet of public-spirited intonation", with "Shevchenko-like public mindedness"; Vinhranovs'kyi: a poet with "the headlong romantic urge"; Borys Oliinyk: "poet of civic and philosophical themes", author of "public-spirited lyrics"; Korotych: a "writer of broad creative range", a "poet of a meditative frame of mind". "The Ukrainian nationalist emigrés abroad," says Kryzhanivs'kyi, "staked heavily on the youth 'boom', hoping the young poets would reject not only the authority but also the ideals of their fathers - humanist, communist and internationalist ideals, but their hopes were dashed". Contrary to these expectations from abroad, according to Kryzhanivs'kyi, "all the young poets are politically active, they are public-minded..."

A805. "Kryzhanovsky, Stepan Andreevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 328.

A bio-bibliographical note of 52 lines about the literary scholar Stepan Kryzhanivs'kyi, born 1911.

A806. Kuchar, Roman V. "Orgy - the tragedy of individual and national dignity." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.2 (Summer 1970): 17- 24.

Lesia Ukrainka's drama "Orhiia" is called here a "short drama of epic dimensions". Even though the action takes place in Corinth during the period of Roman domination of Greece, says Kuchar, "Orhiia" "is definitely not a historical play, for that its poetic image is too transparent just as the sounds of contemporary notes in it are too intensive." It is, in Kuchar's view, "essentially the tragedy of character regardless of the fact that dignity of the entire nation is obviously at stake." National ramification of the drama, according to Kuchar, "does not affect its artistic integrity". It is a work, says Kuchar, that "by its intensive humanism, intimate artistry, appealing universal values of dignity and conscience, together with deeply interwoven symbolism challenges brute forces of physical power of all ages." The dialog between Phedon and Anteus (30 lines beginning with "I see more suitable making mausoleums") appears on pp.21-22 in the author's own translation.

A807. Kuchar, Roman V. "Shevchenko and S owacki - parallels." Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 272-273.

An English summary of a Ukrainian article on pp. 86-96. The Ukrainian poet Shevchenko and the Polish poet S owacki, according to this summary, "display characteristic qualities that have much in common", both in "their poetry of intimate lyricism" and in their "poems with historical background". S owacki, according to Kuchar, "even to the greater degree than the poets of the so called 'Ukrainian school in the Polish literature'... had masterly depicted the glory and tragedy of the Ukrainian past."

A808. Kuchar, Roman V. "The traditional and the contemporary in Ukrainian émigré literature." / Roman Kuchar (Kukhar). Ukrainian Review (London). 19.1 (Spring 1972): 66-81. Biblio.

A survey of Ukrainian literature in exile with an emphasis on literary associations and their periodical publications from MUR in the late 1940's to SLOVO in the 1950'-1960's. According to Kuchar: "The émigré writers in their majority resent being linked in any way with the 'modernism', claiming their writing to be contemporary though based on the traditional principle..." "The lines between the 'contemporary-traditional' on the one side, and the 'modern' on the other, are drawn in this context sharply enough and interpreted as two different ideologies, national, self-identifiable and cosmopolitan, foreign respectively, both of them not necessarily sensitive to each other." "... writing style branded 'modern' proves to be much less popular than the traditional type among Ukrainian émigrés."

A809. Kuchar, Roman V. "Ukrainian clandestine literature in the USSR." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.3 (Autumn 1978): 276-282.

A review of the six issues of Ukrains'kyi visnyk, an underground journal published since January 1970 in Ukraine and smuggled out to the West, and of the literary and political writing circulating in Ukraine by such authors as Ivan Dziuba, Valentyn Moroz and Ievhen Sverstiuk.

A810. Kuchar, Roman V. "Ukrainian emigre literature after 1945." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.3 (Autumn 1977): 264-270.

Not a critical survey, but the author's general comments and reflections on the state of Ukrainian émigré literature in the West. Says Kuchar: "...the growth of émigré literature has been stunted by the struggle to survive on the part of Ukrainian and other émigré writers themselves, the absence of a systematic and informed literary criticism, the lack of sophisticated readers and the lack of publishing funds..." "It is too early... to pass final judgment on what should be considered a great or mediocre work in the maze of recent literary production within the Ukrainian émigré symbiosis. Neither the traditional camp nor any group of modernists seems to have produced any arresting work of art."

A811. Kuchkin, V.A. "Primary Chronicle". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 20 (1979): 538. Biblio.

An encyclopedic article of over one half-page about Povest vremennykh let. The work is characterized as "An all-Russian chronicle codex compiled in Kiev in the second decade of the 12th century." Says Kuchkin about PVL: "Even though it did nor survive as a separate, independent literary monument, the Primary Chronicle served as the basis for most of the chronicle codices that have been preserved. The oldest, basic copies are the Laurentian chronicle which reflects the second redaction of the Primary Chronicle, and the Hypatian Chronicle, which reflects the third redaction."

A812. "Kulchytskyi, Mykola." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 56.

Described as "a young poet from the Dniprodzerzhynsk region" (4 lines).

A813. "Kulik, Ivan Yulianovich (pseudonyms: R. Rolinato, Vasil Rolenko)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 325.

Bio-bibliographical data (25 lines) about Ivan Kulyk (b. 26 January 1897, died in prison 14 October 1941).

A814. "Kulish, Mikola Gur'ievich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 560. Biblio.

Unsigned 24-line bio-bibliographical note about Mykola Kulish (1892-1942). Individual plays are given brief characteristics, e.g. "Bourgeois-nationalist tendencies appeared in Kulish's tragedy The People's Malakhii (1927; staged, 1928; 2nd ed. 1929) and in the comedy Mina Mazailo (1929). He attempted to overcome his ideological and aesthetic errors in the play Sonata Pathetique (staged, 1931) which affirmed the triumph of the Revolution..."

A815. "Kulish, Mykola (Nikolay Gur'yevich)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 325.

Twenty lines of bio-bibliographical data about the playwright Mykola Kulish (b. 6 December 1892, d. in prison in 1937).

A816. "Kultura i zhyttia". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 562.

An 11-line note about a Ukrainian newspaper published in Kyiv since 1945 (originally under the title Radianske mystetstvo). It specializes in the news about cultural activities in Ukraine. It's circulation in 1973, according to this entry, was 64,000.

A817. "Kundzich, Alexei Leonardovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 14 (1977): 109. Biblio.

Oleksii Kundzich (1904-1964) was a short story writer and translator. (12 lines).

A818. "Kurbas, Aleksandr (Les') Stepanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 328-329.

Forty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about Les' Kurbas, the theater director born 12 September 1887, died in prison 15 October 1942.

A819. Kuziakina, Nataliia. "Face to face with one's life" / Nataliya Kuziakina. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.8 (August 1969): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna 5 (1969): 170-177].

The chapter on Mykola Kulish in Smolych's memoirs Rozpovid' pro nespokiii, according to Kuziakina, "contains a great deal of interest. It is written with unquestionable respect for that dramatist and literary activist". Smolych admits, says Kuziakina, that "as a dramatist, Kulish possessed a talent of international dimensions." However, according to Kuziakina, "what Smolych of today says about Kulish's plays does not always correspond to what Smolych wrote about these same plays at the time of their first appearance." The Digest supplied title reads: "Smolych criticized for his portrayal of M. Kulish".

A820. "Kuzmowycz, Olha Nadia." Who's Who of American Women. 10th ed. (1977-1978): 500.

Thirteen lines of bio-bibliographical data about the journalist Ol'ha Kuz'movych (b. 1917).

A821. "Kuzmowycz, Olha Nadia." World Who's Who of Women. 4th ed. Ed. director: Ernest Kay. Cambridge: International Biographical Centre, 1978. 657. port.

Twenty two lines, with portrait, about the journalist Ol'ha Kuz'movych.

A822. "Kuzyakina, Nataliya Borisovna." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 343.

Bio-bibliographical data about Nataliia Kuziakina (born 1928), characterized here as a Ukrainian literary critic. (17 lines).

A823. "Kvitka, Kliment Vasil'evich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 637.

A bio-bibliographical note (18 lines + biblio.) about Klyment Kvitka (1880-1953), characterized here as "Soviet musicologist and folklorist. Husband of Lesia Ukrainka" who "wrote many works on the theory of Ukrainian musical folklore..."

A824. "Kvitka, Kliment Vasil'yevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 334.

Bio-bibliographical data (17 lines) about Klyment Kvitka, folklorist, music historian (b.4 February 1880, d. 19 September 1953).

A825. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "The great 'paver of the way'." / Yevhen Kirilyuk. Ukraine. 3(27) (1976): 9-11. illus., part col.

The article, written on the occasion of the 120th birth anniversary of Ivan Franko, has 11 illustrations which include monuments to Franko in Lviv and Kyiv, photos of the house he lived in and his study, a display of his books in foreign languages, his portrait from 1890, and photos of Franko with his wife and with B. Hrinchenko. Kyryliuk stresses the political aspects of Franko's work and claims that "Franko's patriotism was inseparably bound to his internationalism". About the poem Moisei, which he considers "the peak of Ukrainian literature", Kyryliuk says the following: "It was written under the influence of the revolutionary events in Russia. In the introduction the author voices his firm belief that the revolution in Russia will bring freedom to the Ukrainians and other fraternal nations 'with the seal of his spirit upon them'."

A826. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "The ideological struggle surrounding the works of Shevchenko." / Ye.P. Kyrylyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.10 (October 1972): 6-8. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo (no.3, March 1972, 62-72)].

A political attack on Shevchenko studies in the West, especially on the 14 vol. edition of Shevchenko's works published by M. Denysiuk in Chicago and on such Shevchenko scholars as P. Zaitsev, V. Miiakovs'kyi, P. Odarchenko, B. Kravtsiv, T. Os'machka and I. Dziuba (whose article on Shevchenko and Khomyakov was published in the émigré journal Suchasnist'). The Digest's title: "Ukrainians abroad told: Hands off Shevchenko!"

A827. Kyryliuk Ievhen. "In an atmosphere of creativity: note from the 7th International Congress of Slavists." / Yevhen Kyrylyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.10 (October 1973): 28-29. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 September 1973): 2].

Kyryliuk reports on the 7th International Congress of Slavists, that took place in Warsaw, on 21-27 August. According to Kyryliuk, among some 900 papers and reports delivered at the Congress, some dealt with Ukrainian literature. He mentions specifically B. Rybakov's paper on the Slovo o polku Ihorevim, Likhachov's paper on literary genres in Kyivan Rus', M. Pishut's (of Czechoslovakia) paper on Shevchenko and Yanko Kral, S. Kozak's (Poland) paper on Kostomarov and Mickiewicz, Vira Sher's (Hungary) paper on I. Franko, M. Laslo's (Romania) paper on Skovoroda's influence on Shevchenko, as well as comparative papers by Ukrainian literary scholars I. Zhuravs'ka, Iu. Bulakhovs'ka, V. Zakharzhevs'ka, N. Krutikova, H. Veres, Ie. Kyryliuk. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian linguist reports on 7th Congress of Slavists."

A828. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "Karadzhich and Ukrainian culture". / E.P. Kyryliuk [in Cyrillic script]. VIII. Medunarodni Slavistički Kongres, Zagreb, 3-9. IX. 1978, Ljubljana. Knjiga referata. [Uredili Ivo Frangeš et al.]. Zagreb: Medunarodni Slavistički Centar SR Hrvatske, 1978. 1:420.

An English abstract of a paper delivered at the 8th International Congress of Slavists in Zagreb in 1978. Kyryliuk discusses Vuk Karadzhich (1787-1864), his publications, especially the Serbian dictionary and the Serbian folk songs and their influence on O. Bodians'kyi (Bodyansky), M. Maksymovych (Maksymovich) and I. Sreznevs'kyi (Sreznevsky).

A829. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "A monument to the eternal revolutionary. The 120th anniversary of the birth of Ivan Franko." / Yevhen Kyrylyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.8 (August 1976): 25-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 June 1976): 3].

Kyryliuk, who is chairman of the editorial board for the publication of Franko's works, speaks on the occasion of the publication of vol.1 of the projected 50-vol. edition. Kyryliuk provides the following information: Franko's archives have been transferred to Kyiv and have made possible new studies, scholarly conferences, the regular publication of archival materials. Almost all fifty volumes have been compiled and are now being edited. The edition is expected to be completed in time for the 125th anniversdary of Franko's birth in 1981. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "50-volume edition of Franko works to appear by 1981".

A830. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "Poetry of great reasoning power." / Yevhen Kirilyuk. Ukraine. 4(40) (1979): 20-21. port.

The article was written to celebrate Mykola Bazhan's 75th birth anniversary. "Poetry projects feeling, but without deep underlying thought and a definite message it looses its vitality and value. That is why we call Bazhan's poetry philosophical, because it is always charged with a deep message of great reasoning power. It is not a shallow statement or the author's momentary stance, but a vital figurative fabric of thought which never fails to excite the reader," says Kyryliuk. The article deals with Bazhan as a poet, translator and encyclopedic scholar. Kyryliuk mentions the fact that Bazhan paid tribute to futurism and romanticism, before he finally "took the path of socialist realism." Illustrated with a large b/w portrait of Bazhan.

A831. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "Taras Shevchenko - the great humanist." / Yevhen Kirilyuk. Ukraine. 1(33) (1978): 24-25. col. illus.

A slightly abridged reprint of the introductory essay to a bi-lingual Ukrainian-English edition of Shevchenko's selected poetry published by Dnipro in Kyiv in 1977. [cf. B085]. Kyryliuk stresses the political aspects and "internationalist sentiments" in Shevchenko's poetry. The article is illustrated with reproductions of two Shevchenko paintings, the cover of Selected Poetry with Shevchenko's self-portrait and a photograph of Shevchenko's monument in Kaniv - all in color.

A832. Kyryliuk, Ievhen. "Words that unite peoples". / Yevhen Kyrylyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 6-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina ( March 1974): 3].

About the interest in and influence of Shevchenko in Poland, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Belarus, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Germany, Mongolia, Japan, India, Vietnam. The survey is limited to selected older materials and provides no bibliographical data. The Digest's title: "Shevchenko studies in foreign countries."

A833. Kysel'ov, Iosyp. "The theater of Mykola Kulish." / Yosyp Kyselyov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.3 (March 1973): 9-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kul'tura i zhyttia (7 January 1973): 2-3].

Mykola Kulish, according to the author, "blazed new trails in the search for new poetics and new dramaturgical techniques..." Kulish's language, in Kysel'ov's view, has "life-giving freshness and clarity", and he uses music not as a means of simple illustration, but "as an active factor in the drama of events". Kysel'ov cites the German critic Friedrich Wolf who, allegedly, called "Sonata Pathetique" the greatest Ukrainian dramatic poem, comparing it with "Faust" and "Peer Gynt". Kysel'ov compares "Maklena Grasa" to A. Miller's "Death of a Salesman" published ten years later. The Digest's title: "Mykola Kulish praised as innovator in drama."

A834. Kysel'ov, Oleksandr. "Grabovskii, Pavel Arsen'evich." / A.I. Kiselev. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 325-326. Biblio.

An article of 30 lines about Pavlo Hrabovs'kyi (1864-1912). According to Kysel'ov, "Grabovskii is an outstanding representative of Ukrainian democratic-revolutionary poetry of the 1880's and 1890's, in the tradition of T.G. Shevchenko."

A835. Kyyashko, H. "In the land of metallurgists and farmers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.11 (November 1971): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (8 October 1971): 1].

The Digest's title: "Week of Ukrainian literature in Dnipropetrovsk oblast". To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the formation of the USSR, according to this report, "Six groups of established masters of the literary craft accompanied by young writers visited gigantic factory shops, construction sites and scientists in their laboratories. Their task was to satisfy the professional thirst for knowledge, discovery and impressions."

A836. Laber, Jeri. "The 'wire skeleton' of Vladimir prison." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.4 (Winter 1974): 56-57.

This article about Valentyn Moroz appeared originally on the OpEd page of the New York Times on Saturday, 9 November 1974. Says Laber about Moroz: "He is suffering from blood and liver disorders and has been given drugs that he fears are damaging his brain. On July 1 he began a hunger strike, declaring that he preferred death to insanity." Laber believes that publicity is a major weapon in the fight for survival of Moroz and other political prisoners.

A837. Laferrière, Daniel. "Potebnja, Šklovskij, and the familiarity-strangeness paradox." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974-1975. 5 (1974-1975): 47-49. Biblio.

Summary of the paper delivered by Daniel Laferrière, professor of Tufts University, at literature seminar on 13 February 1975 and of the discussion that followed. The chief conflict between Oleksandr Potebnia and Viktor Shklovskii, according to this summary, involves Potebnia's concept of "synecdochicness" and Shklovskii's notion of defamiliarization (ostranenie). The speaker, according to the summary, attempted a reconciliation of the two views.

A838. Laferrière, Daniel. "Potebnja, Šklovskij, and the familiarity/strangeness paradox." Russian Literature. 4.2 (April 1976): 175-198. Biblio.: 192-198.

The literary theories of Oleksandr Potebnia (1835-1891) were rejected by Viktor Šklovskij (b.1893) whose 1917 article "Isskustvo kak priem" is "regarded as the manifesto of Russian Formalism", according to Laferrière. The author attempts "to closely examine Šklovskij's somewhat delayed rejection of Potebnjanism, to determine whether and to what extent this rejection was justified, and to formulate a paradox that arises out of the clash between Šklovskij and Potebnja."

A839. "Lagoda, Valentin Konstantinovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 345.

A bio-bibliographical note of 25 lines about Valentyn Lahoda, writer, satirist and poet born in 1913.

A840. Lakiza, N.A. "Le, Ivan Leont'evich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 14 (1977): 312-313. Biblio.

Ivan Le, pseudonym of I.L. Moisia (b. 1895), was the author of short stories and novels.

A841. Landa, Malva. "The case of Vasyl Stus: Persecuted poet." / Malva Landa and Tatyana Khodorovich. Index on Censorship. 6.4 (July-August 1977): 13-14.

An account (with an editorial note) of prison experiences of Vasyl' Stus in both camp no.17 in Mordovia (from Autumn 1975 to June 1976) and camp no.19 to which he was transferred in June 1976. The authors relate how Stus was denied the special diet prescribed for him after an ulcer operation, how his correspondence was blocked, how he was handcuffed, subjected to daily searches, obliged to strip naked, etc. After Stus returned from the hospital, according to the authors, "he was officially informed that all his poetry (at least 300 stanzas) had been confiscated - perhaps destroyed. In June 1976, when camp no.17 was dissolved, another 300 stanzas - poems by Goethe, Rilke and Kipling, translated by Stus - were taken from him. Stus was also informed of an official authorization for the destruction of all his poetry - not less than 600 (or 800) poems - the work of all his years in camp..." According to Landa and Khodorovich, Stus's fellow- inmates (Soldatov, Penson, Heifetz, Yuzkevich) petitioned the authorities on behalf of Stus and as a protest declared a partial hunger strike (no hot food) which lasted four days. On behalf of political prisoners of camp no.19, the authors make the following appeal to the English PEN Club: "... the poetic legacy of the Ukrainian poet Vasyl Stus is threatened with destruction. Throughout the whole length of his term in camp his poetry has periodically been taken from him. The political prisoners of camp no.19 request the PEN Club to come to the defence of Stus and his work, and also to petition the government of the USSR."

A842. LaPica, Larry. "Taras Shevchenko: Bard of Ukraine." Ukrainian Quarterly. 28.2 (Summer 1972): 146-165.

An appreciation of Shevchenko written by a young student at the University of California at Riverside. Based on available English language materials, the article quotes a number of Shevchenko poems, reprinted from a variety of sources. The longer quotes are: Thoughts from a prison (The sun sets, mountains fade) / Tr. Florence Randal Livesay (29 lines, pp.146-147); Dedication (Songs of mine, O songs of mine) / Tr. John Weir (16 lines, pp.152-153); The Dream (Dawn! Flying, I watch it from above) / Tr. Arthur Prudden Coleman (33 lines, pp.155-156); The dream (My God, my only God)/ Tr. C.A. Manning (13 lines, p.157); The Testament (When I am dead, then bury me) / Tr. John Weir (24 lines, p.158). For identifications of individual poems see Index.

A843. Laszlo-Kutiuk, Magdalene. "Main trends of the Ukrainian poetry of the XXth century." VIII. Medunarodni Slavistički Kongres, Zagreb, 3-9. IX. 1978, Ljubljana. Knjiga referata. [Uredili Ivo Frangeš et al.]. Zagreb: Medunarodni Slavistički Centar SR Hrvatske, 1978. 2:495.

A one-page abstract in English of a paper delivered at the 8th International Congress of Slavists in Zagreb in 1978. The author characterizes what she considers the main phases in the development of Ukrainian poetry, i.e. a/1901-1903, an attempt to introduce symbolism (Voronyi, Moloda muza, Ukrains'ka khata); b/ 1914-1921, second wave of symbolism (Tychyna, Ryl's'kyi); c/ 1921-1931, vanguard movement (Iohansen, Shkurupii, Pluzhnyk, Ellan-Blakytnyi, Bazhan); d/ neoclassical movement (Ryl's'kyi, Drai-Khmara, Zerov); e/ 1932-1960, strict conformity to the principles of socialist realism; f/ 1961- a tendency of returning to the sources.

A844. Lavrynenko, Iurii. "The literature of border line situations." / Jurij awrynenko. Tr. by Colleen Taylor. Kultura Essays. Leopold Tyrmand, ed. New York: Free Press in coop. with the State University of New York at Albany; London: Collier-Macmillan [©1970]. 198-210.

Lavrynenko uses Oswald Spengler's concept of an individual's "ultimate decision" in certain borderline situations where such a moral decision may have a serious effect on the future of mankind. But, says Lavrynenko, "Spengler was not familiar with the 'borderline situation' as a continually developing crisis, a permanent state". Spengler's 'responsible man" says Lavrynenko, "was not yet confronted with the division of his own personality because the struggle as yet was being waged only in the outer world and not within the human soul. He did not have to face directly the compromise with the devil as the iron command of history, the will of God." In his essay Lavrynenko gives four variations of the Spenglerian 'ultimate decision' by presenting examples of four writers of the post-revolutionary Ukraine who "destroyed their souls", each in his own way, in the name of victory over evil: Pavlo Tychyna who chose compromise and total self-renunciation, Mykola Khvylovyi [Chvylovy in text] who committed suicide demonstrating his protest; Mykola Kulish who perished in a Soviet concentration camp and Todos Os'machka (Teodozy Osmachka in text) who chose 'weakness as the ultimate escape' and survived by feigning insanity.

A845. Le, Ivan. "How our 'Literaturka' was born (On the 3000th issue of Literaturna Ukraina)." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 24-25. [Original in Ukrainian in Literaturna Ukraina (5 December 1972): 1].

Remarks of Ivan Le who was the first editor of this literary weekly, the first issue of which was published in March 1927 under the title Literaturna hazeta. Prior to this, according to Le, literary pages were published as part of the oblast newspaper Proletarska pravda. The Digest's title: "Literaturna Ukraina marks 3000th issue."

A846. "Le (real name: Moysya), Ivan Leontevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 352.

Thirty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about the novelist and short story writer who wrote under the pseudonym Ivan Le (real name: Ivan Moisia, born 1895).

A847. "Lectures on Ukrainian literature at Queens College." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.2 (Summer 1973): 211-212.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events" about a series of four lectures on Ukrainian émigré literature - drama, prose, literary criticism and poetry - given at the Slavic Department of Queens College in Flushing, N.Y. on May 1, 8, 11 and 15 by Larissa Onyshkevych, Leo Rudnytzky, John Fizer and Bohdan Rubchak.

A848. Leeming, Monika. "Greek and Latin elements in Pamvo Berynda's Lexicon of 1627." Slavonic and East European Review. 51.123 (April 1973): 182-213.

"Pamvo Berynda's Church Slavonic-Ukrainian lexicon is one of the most important monuments of East Slavonic lexicography," says Leeming. She provides a listing of words from Berynda's lexicon which are derivatives or borrowings from Greek and Latin.

A849. Lencyk, Wasyl. "Bohdan Lepky's letter to V. Lotocky, editor-in-chief of Svoboda." Al'manakh Ukrainskoho Narodnoho Soiuzu na rik 1974. Jersey City, N.J. : Svoboda, 1974. 184.

An English language summary of an article that appears in Ukrainian on pp. 58-59. Bohdan Lepkyi's letter is from the year 1919 and was sent from Wetzlar, Germany.

A850000. Lenhoff, Gail. "The making of the medieval Russian journey "/ Vroon, Gail Diane Lenhoff. Dissertation Abstracts International. 39.3 (September 1978): 1630-A.

Abstract of a 1978 PhD dissertation at the University of Michigan. "The journey or xoždenie... provides many insights into the nature and development of Russian letters", says the author. Four works are examined in the dissertation: pilgrimages of Abbot Danylo and of Archbishop Antonii to Constantinople, as well as journeys of Ignatii of Smolensk and of Afanasii Nikitin, the latter ("Journey beyond three seas), according to the author, representing the "culmination of the entire tradition." The dissertation, 273 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no. 7815328.

A851. "Leonid Plyushch, Ukrainian cyberneticist." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 24.11/12 (287-288) (November/December 1973): 31- 32. port.

According to this unsigned article, a trial was held in Kyiv on 14 January 1973 at which Leonid Pliushch was sentenced to a psychiatric prison for an undisclosed length of time. Pliushch was charged with anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda according to Art. 62 of the Criminal code of the Ukrainian SSR. The anonymous article provides biographical data about Pliushch. Leonid Pliushch, the mathematician, is also a literary critic.

A852. Leont'ev, A.A. "Potebnia, Aleksandr Afanas'evich" / A.A. Leont'ev and R.M. Tseitlin. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 20 (1979): 472-473. Biblio.

Oleksandr Potebnia (1835-1891) who wrote a number of works on Ukrainian language, Ukrainian folklore, theory of literature, ethnology, thought and language, is described here as "Ukrainian and Russian Slavic philologist and Slavicist". The authors discuss Potebnia's contributions in an article over half-page long and say, among other things: "Potebnia actively participated in the creation of Ukrainian culture, the development of which he saw closely related to the history of the Russian culture..." and "Of particular interest are Potebnia's 'linguistic poetics' and his views on poetic language, the nature of poetry, and the nature of art in general."

A853. "Lesya Ukrainka centennial." Forum. 14 (Fall 1970): 12. illus.

An unsigned note about the plans for the centennial jubilee celebrations of Lesia Ukrainka in 1971. Plans include performances of L. Ukrainka's plays, a film based on a script by Ivan Drach, a commemorative medal, etc.

A854. "Lesya Ukrainka monument in Kiev." Forum. 25 (1974): 22-23. illus.

An unsigned note about the unveiling of Lesia Ukrainka's monument (the work of the sculptor H. Kalchenko) that took place in Kyiv on 3 September 1973. There is a full page photo of the monument on p.23 and an illustration of Halyna Kalchenko at work on p.22.

A855. "Let the people judge: the true story behind the monument to Lesya Ukrainka in Saskatoon." / Statement by the National Executive Committee of the Association of the United Ukrainian Canadians. Ukrainian Canadian. 29.597 (91) (February 1977): 8-21. illus.

A polemic against the so-called "nationalist" Ukrainians in Canada who, according to this article, attempted to prevent the erection of Lesia Ukrainka's statue, a gift of the Ukrainian SSR, on the grounds of the University of Saskatchewan. Illustrated with six photographs, including photos of Lesia Ukrainka and Taras Shevchenko monuments and a group photo depicting the sculptors Halina Kalchenko and Anatoly Ignashchenko and the writers Iurii Kosach and Petro Kravchuk [Peter Krawchuk].

A856. "Let us increase our spiritual treasures. From the open party meeting of the Kiev Writers' Organization." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.3 (March 1967): 20-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 February 1967): 1-4].

L. Dmyterko who spoke at the meeting said that "the skill of the author is also an ideological category". He noted that "some young writers see only the negative aspects of life, and therefore their works are by and large twisted and distorted." Singled out for critical attention as "vague" or "ideologically foreign" were B. Oliinyk's poem "Doroha" (published in Dnipro, no.1 for 1967) and Ia. Stupak's story "Hordynia" (published in Vitchyzna no.12). The Digest's supplied title reads: "Kiev writers criticize lack of ideology in prose".

A857. "Letter to P. Shelest." Ukrainian Review (London). 16.1 (Spring 1969): 43-44.

A letter to the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Ukraine Petro Shelest on behalf of Viacheslav Chornovil sentenced in November 1967 to 3 years imprisonment for preparing and disseminating for, what was called, "libellous inventions". The letter - written probably in May- June 1968 - is signed by Ivan Dziuba, Ivan Svitlychnyi, Nadia Svitlychna and Lina Kostenko.

A858. Lev, Vasyl'. "Hryhoriy Skovoroda: a Ukrainian philosopher." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.2 (Summer 1973): 12-14.

A biographical article written on the occasion of Skovoroda's 250th birthday. The article includes seven lines of Skovoroda's poem "Every city has its customs and rights" in an unattributed translation.

A859. Lev, Vasyl'. "Mykhaylo Vozniak - a literary historian and literary scholar" / Wasyl Lew. Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 273-274.

An English summary of a bio-bibliographical study of Mykhailo Vozniak (1881-1954) that appears in Ukrainian on pp. 97-106.

A860. Lev, Vasyl'. "Philological studies within the framework of the Shevchenko Scientific Society over a period of one hundred years." / Wasyl Lew. Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 269.

English summary of a bibliographical survey in Ukrainian that appears on pp. 5-18.

A861. Lev, Vasyl'. "Resume". In his Bohdan Lepkyi, 1872-1941: zhyttia i tvorchist'. New York: Naukove Tovarystvo im. Shevchenka, 1976. (Zapysky Naukovoho Tovarystva im. Shevchenka, t.193). 393-395. illus.

A two-and-a half page English summary of a book in Ukrainian about the life and work of Bohdan Lepkyi (1872-1941). Bohdan Lepkyi was a poet, novelist and literary scholar, author of many books of poetry, prose, history of literature and literary studies. The book contains, in addition to a detailed biography and a literary analysis of Lepkyi's poetry, short stories and novels, an extensive (pp.293-363) multilingual bibliography of works by and about Lepkyi. The table of contents appears also in English on pp. 398-399. The book is illustrated with a series of b/w photographs of biographical interest.

A862. Levada, Oleksandr. "Under the Leninist banner of Party- and People-Mindedness". Address by Oleksandr Levada, Secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 31-35. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 May 1973): 1-3].

Levada spoke at the joint meeting of the Executive Board Presidiums of the Creative Unions of writers, cinematographers, composers and artists of Ukraine on 22 May 1973 in Kyiv. He said, among other things: "...our community will no longer tolerate any kind of ideological waverings, any kind of flirtation with concepts that are ideologically hostile to our world outlook..." "... it was only when certain writers permitted themselves antisocial activity, when they cynically passed their slanderous samizdat (self-published) scribblings abroad into the hands of our most inveterate enemies, when certain artists - for a mess of potage - were ready to sell the fruits of socialist literature and art and demonstratively, servively bowed before the most corrupt examples of bourgeois literature and art - it was only then that attempts were made to introduce elements of an unhealthy tendency into the creative atmosphere of our unions, to create collisions between the older and the younger generations, to discredit even our creative method - socialist realism - before the whole world. Now an end has been put to these attempts. As a result, we can now work more confidently and more calmly..." Ivan Bilyk's Mech Areia, Volodymyr Zaremba's Ivan Mandzura, Ivan Ilienko's biography of Hryhorii Kvitka- Osnovianenko, P. Shelest's Ukraina nasha radians'ka, M. Kytsenko's Khortytsia v heroitsi i lehendakh are singled out as examples of books with ideological errors. The Digest's title: "Levada rehashes latest Party guidelines for creative unions".

A863. Levada, Oleksandr. "We must raise the work of our printed organs to the level of today's needs. Speech by Oleksandr Levada.". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 8-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 February 1975): 1-3].

A critical examination and evaluation of literary journals of Ukraine. Levada focuses on the shortcomings in the light of the latest party directives. Literaturna Ukraina is accused of "thoughtlessness evident in organization and even in the manner of presenting various materials", of its inability "to strike the correct tone in certain critically controversial articles". Vitchyzna is accused of having printed "ideologically inferior, artistically imperfect works, marked by asocial attitudes, artificial philosophizing, estheticism in the worst sense of the word, and petty bourgeois tastes..." Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo is given credit for its "greater activization", but criticized for its low circulation and lack of popularity among writers. Zhovten', Prapor, Donbas and Vsesvit, according to Levada, "rarely carry important articles on the contemporary literary process, and sometimes they feature materials that are in themselves highly deserving of harsh criticism".

A864. "Levada (real name: Kosyak), Aleksandr Stepanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968).

Bio-bibliographical data (38 lines) about Oleksandr Levada, the poet and playwright born in 1909 whose real name was Kosiak.

A865. Lewin, Paulina. "The Ukrainian popular religious stage of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries on the territory of the Polish Commonwealth." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.3 (September 1977): 308-329.

According to Lewin, Ukrainian religious plays in the 17th and 18th centuries "were created and performed by members of semi-professional wandering companies", consisting primarily of students or graduates of the brotherhood schools or the Mohyla Academy, and were generally connected with holy days of the Church calendar, especially during the Holy Week before Easter. Lewin discusses a few plays or fragments of plays from this time period, and analyzes Slovo o zburenniu pekla, which she calls the most interesting and dramatically most mature play".

A866. Libman, Z. "Critical paradoxes". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.6 (June 1970): 11-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Robitnycha hazeta (25 April 1970):3].

The editors of Vsesvit are criticized for publishing critical articles by H. Kochur (about the French modernist poet St. John Perse and about Lorca) and by V. Hakkebush (on Pirandello), for not providing Marxist-Leninist critical comments to accompany the publication of translations of the work of such writers as Eugene Ionesco and Somerset Maugham. The Digests title: "Vsesvit censured for lack of Marxist-Leninist interpretations". A867. Likhachov, Dmitry. "The authenticity of the Slovo o polku Igoreve; a brief survey of the arguments." / D.S. Likhachev. Oxford Slavonic Papers. 13 (1967): 33-46.

Ilchester lecture delivered in the Taylor Institution, Oxford, on 16 February 1967. The author discusses textological and linguistic evidence for the authenticity of Slovo o polku Ihorevim, motives for its composition, parallels of individual images in the old Kyivan Rus' literature and in folklore, the interrelationship of Slovo and Zadonshchina, the incompatibility of Slovo with the 18th century, the pagan character of Slovo, etc. Likhachov's conclusion: "the whole hypothesis of the sceptics, that the Slovo is of late origin, remains - to say the least - quite unproven."

A868. Likhachov, Dmitry. "Further remarks on the textological triangle: Slovo o polku Igoreve, Zadonshchina and the Hypatian Chronicle." / D.S. Likhachev. Oxford Slavonic Papers. n.s. 2 (1969): 106-115.

A continued discussion about the authenticity of the Slovo o polku Ihorevim, a response to J. Fennell's paper published in the previous year. [cf. A337]. Likhachov points out, among other things, that Slovo was first published in 1800, Zadonshchina in 1852 and Hypatian Chronicle in 1843. "The hypothesis that the Zadonshchina influenced the Slovo consequently rests upon another hypothesis, according to which the eighteenth- century author of the Slovo was familiar with the unpublished and comparatively rare manuscript of the Zadonshchina and of the Hypatian Chronicle: this fact by itself considerably diminishes the probability of the first hypothesis."

A869. Likhachov, Dmitry. "Tale of Igor's Campaign, The" / D.S. Likhachev. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 23 (1979): 719. Biblio.

More than half-page article (61 lines) on the Slovo o polku Ihorevim, called by this entry "a monument of old Russian literature dating from the late 12th century" with the following caveat: "The Tale dates from a period when Old Russian literature had not yet become divided into Russian, Ukrainian, and Byelorussian literatures; it belongs in equal measure to all three fraternal peoples and has influenced all three literatures."

A870. Likhachov, Dmitry. "The type and character of the Byzantine influence on Old Russian literature." / D.S. Likhachev. Oxford Slavonic Papers. 13 (1967): 14-32.

Delivered originally as a lecture in the Taylor Institution, Oxford, on 17 February 1967. According to Likhachov, "...it is more correct to speak of the transplantation of Byzantine culture unto Slavonic soil rather than of cultural 'influences'. A cultural trait on transplantation begins in its new surroundings an independent existence, and sometimes takes on a fresh form." This transplantation, in the author's view, was not a mechanical process; the translated literature did not reflect the contemporary Byzantine literature, but consisted of certain selections; the Slavonic recension of Byzantine culture came by way of Bulgaria, and the role of Old Church Slavonic was similar to that of Latin and Arabic. Says Likhachov: "Native forms of the literature of the upper feudal classes and local works of national significance confined within the boundaries of one country began to appear very early in the South and East Slavonic countries. In Kievan Russia chronicles were written which had no connexion [sic] - either in form or content or in the ideas they express - with the historical works of Byzantium; political oratory, reflecting local political problems, made its appearance, as well as local forms of hagiographical literature, and so on. These local works and literary forms penetrated to other Slavonic countries much less easily than did the works which were more clearly connected with Byzantine literature, i.e. the works of the Slavonic recension of Byzantine culture."

A871. Likhachov, Dmitry. "What is the essence of the differences between old and modern Russian literature?" / D.S. Likhachev. Soviet Studies in Literature. 2.3 (Spring 1966): 64-88.

A translation of an article published originally in Voprosy literatury (no.5, 1965). In discussing the structural differences, the author characterizes the literature of Kyivan Rus' in the following words: "...writing in Old Rus' bore a less personal nature and had certain qualities in common with folklore... personal styles were less pronounced... the chief difference between one genre in Old Russian literature and another was the use to which it was put - ritualistic, legal or other functions. The boundaries of literature were not clearly drawn..." "Old Russian literature, particularly in its beginning, was represented by individual writings highly diverse in nature, each of which was more or less sui generis in type and form". He cites as examples Slovo o polku Ihorevim, Ilarions's [Hilarion's] "Oration", Monomakh's "Pouchenie ditiam", etc.

A872. Lipatov, Valentin. "The greatest monument - a renewed Ukraine." Ukrainian Canadian.. 23.537 (58) (July/August 1971): 11. illus.

Lipatov, First Secretary of the USSR Embassy to Canada, spoke at the unveiling of the Vasyl' Stefanyk monument on 22 May 1971 in Edmonton. He said: "Soviet Ukraine... marked this 100th anniversary of Wasyl Stefanyk's birth with honour and respect... But the greatest monument to the writer-democrat is the renewed Ukrainian nation - a happy Ukraine."

A873. "Lisovyy, Pyotr Andreyevich (pen name: Svashchenko)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 352.

Bio-bibliographical data (8 lines) about the writer and journalist Petro Lisovyi (b.12 June 1892, d.17 January 1943).

A974. "Literary criticism in today's ideological struggle (Round table discussion sponsored by the Literaturnoe obozreniye (Literary review) and Radyans'ke literaturoznavstvo (Soviet literary studies) journals." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.12 December 1975): 18-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo. 5 (May 1975): 56-76 and 6 (June 1975): 63-81].

A meeting of critics and literary scholars, organized by the Russian journal Literaturnoie obozreniie and Ukrainian journal Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo, was held in Kyiv on 30-31 January 1975. The recently published collections of articles Proty fal'shyvykh kontseptsii, V chadu fal'shyvykh idei, Spivdruzhnist' literatur i suchasna ideolohichna borot'ba, Literatura pravdy i prohresu served as the basis for discussion. Participants included: Yu.I. Surovtsev, V.H. Byelyayev, D. Pavlychko, the editor of Vsesvit, A.T. Hordiyenko, M.M. Parkhomenko, S.A Kryzhanivskyy, H.D.Verves, I.O. Dzeverin, V.H. Donchyk and others. Ideological struggle and the role played in it by literary criticism was the main subject of discussion. Concerns were expressed about attempts to supplement Marxism with existentialism and Freudianism, to rehabilitate the Ukrainian neoclassic writer Oswald Burghardt-Iurii Klen, to revive the slogans "Away from Moscow" and "Give us psychological Europe" "under the false pretense of internationalism", to characterize Ukrainian literature as backward because of socialist realism, etc. The Digest supplied title reads: "Hold conference on role of criticism in ideological struggle".

A875. "Literature." Soviet Ukraine. Chief editorial board: M.P. Bazhan (editor-in-chief), et al. Kiev: Editorial Office of the Ukrainian Soviet Encyclopedia, Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian S.S.R. [1969?]. 481-498. illus.

An unsigned encyclopedic survey of the history of Ukrainian literature from the early oral folklore to the Soviet Ukrainian belles lettres of the early 1960's, illustrated with a fascimile of the title page of 1798 Eneida, a photograph of Shevchenko, of Franko's monument in Lviv and three group photos of Ukrainian writers. There are separate chapters entitled "Folk poetical art", "Literature before the October revolution" and "Soviet literature" - the latter divided into subchapters: Literature during the October revolution and civil war (1917-1920); Literature of the 1920's; Literature of the 1930's; Literature during the Great Patriotic War of the Soviet Union (1941-1945); Literature of the final stage in building socialism and the period of fullscale building of communism. A preliminary note characterizes Ukrainian literature in the following words: "In its basic tendency, which was democratic and progressive, Ukrainian literature truthfully portrayed the people's struggles against social and national oppression, for liberty and independence.".... Ukrainian Soviet literature today is a component part of the literature of socialist realism, a powerful means of communist upbringing and an ideological instrument of the C.P.S.U. in the struggle to build a communist society."

A876. "Literature". Ukraine: A Concise Encyclopaedia. Prepared by Shevchenko Scientific Society. Ed. by Volodymyr Kubijovyč. Toronto: Published for the Ukrainian National Association by University of Toronto Press, 1963-1971. 2v. illus., ports. bibliographies.

While the bulk of material on Ukrainian literature appears in Chapter VIII of this encyclopedia [v.1, pp.960-1097], there are additional literature-related subsections in other chapters in both volumes. An attempt is made here to enumerate this material in the detailed contents, as follows:

Contents: 1. History of the study of Ukrainian literature: The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Contemporary period. / N. Hlobenko. [1: 960-972]. Ukrainian literature and literary criticism abroad / B. Krawciw. [1: 972-973]. 2. The old period: eleventh to fifteenth centuries. The beginnings of writing and of literature. Translated and borrowed literature. The monumental style (Literature of the great Kievan realm). The ornamental style in literature (The period of disintegration of the Kievan realm). The period of transition (Fourteenth-fifteenth centuries). / D. Čiževsky. [1:974-990]. 3. The renaissance, the reformation and the baroque. The renaissance and the reformation. Baroque. / D. Čiževsky. [1: 990-1001]. 4. Classicism. Poetic travesty. Dramatic literature. Prose. / D. Čiževsky. [1: 1006-1007]. 5. Romanticism. Preliminary remarks. The Kharkiv group of romanticists. The Rus'ka Triitsia. The high point in the romantic movement. / D. Čiževsky. [1: 1007-1019]. 6. The period of realism. Introductory remarks. From romanticism to realism. The realism of the second half of the nineteenth century / N. Hlobenko. [1: 1019-1031]. 7. The age of modernism. Preliminary remarks. Prose and dramaturgy in prose. Poetry and poetic drama / N. Hlobenko. [1: 1032-1042]. 8. The period between the two world wars. Central and Eastern Ukraine. / N. Hlobenko. [1: 1043-1059]. Western Ukraine and the emigration. / I. Korowytsky. [1: 1059-1068]. 9. During and after the Second World War. Soviet Ukraine / G. Boiko-Blokhyn and B. Krawciw. [1: 1069-1079]. The emigration after the war / I. Korowytsky. [1: 1079-1087]. 10. Ukraine in literary works written in the Russian language / N. Hlobenko. [1: 1087-1092]. 11. Polish-Ukrainian literary relations / Józef obodowski. [1: 1092-1097].

Other literature-related material:

The national anthem / Z. Lysko [1: 36-37]. Oral literature of the people. / V. Petrov. [1: 350-361]. The historical epos. Occupational songs. Lyric songs / S.Yu. and P. Odarchenko. [1: 361-366]. Lyric and epic poetry. Folk prose / V. Petrov and P. Odarchenko. [1: 366-371]. Ritualistic poetry and "Soviet folklore" / B. Krawciw [1: 426-427]. Book publishing and the press. 1. Survey of bibliological research / B. Krawciw [2: 428-431]. 2. Bibliography / B. Krawciw [2: 431-440]. 3. The beginnings of printing / B. Krawciw [2: 441-444]. 4. Book printing in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries / B. Krawciw [2: 444-450]. 5. Nineteenth and early twentieth centuries / V. Doroshenko, B. Krawciw, P. Zlenko [2: 450-458]. 6. Book publishing 1919-66 / V. Doroshenko, P. Zlenko, B. Krawciw, V. Kubijovyč. [2: 458-473]. 7. The sale and distribution of books / B. Krawciw [2: 473-476]. 8. The press / A. Zhyvotko, B. Krawciw [2: 476-519]. Theater (especially sections dealing with: Drama criticism [2: 616-617]; The ancient Ukrainian theater / G. Luzhnytsky [2: 618-622]; Repertory / V. Haievsky. [2:625-627]; Dramaturgy / V. Haievsky, V. Revutsky [2: 637-639]; Dramaturgy / V. Revutsky [2: 647-648; 652-654]. Ukrainians abroad. In the United States: Cultural and community life. Press and publishing. Literature. / V. Markus [2: 1139-1142]. In Canada: Press and publications / B. Kazymyra [2: 1178-1180]; Ukrainian literature in Canada / C.H. Andrusyshen [2: 1180-1182]. In Brazil: Literature, scholarship, arts / O. Boruszenko [2: 1202- 1203]. In Argentina: Art and literary life / E. Onatsky [2: 1211-1212]. In Poland: Literature, art, scholarship / V. Kubijovyč [2: 1239]. In Czechoslovakia: Literary and artistic life. Publishing and broadcasting / V. Markus [2: 1246-1247]. In Australia: Educational and cultural life / T. Lachowych [2: 1260-1262].

The extensive scholarly encyclopedic treatment of various aspects of Ukrainian literature is illustrated with b/w reproductions of title pages, illuminations from medieval books, autographs and portraits of major Ukrainian writers, among them I. Kotliarevs'kyi, P. Hulak-Artemovskyi, H. Kvitka-Osnovianenko, M. Shashkevych, T. Shevchenko, P. Kulish, M. Vovchok, Iu. Fed'kovych, A. Konys'kyi, I. Nechui-Levyts'kyi, P. Myrnyi, B. Hrinchenko, I. Franko, I. Tobilevych, P. Hrabovs'kyi, M. Kotsiubyns'kyi, V. Stefanyk, O. Kobylians'ka, L. Ukrainka, P. Tychyna, M. Ryl's'kyi, M. Khvyl'ovyi, Iu. Ianovs'kyi, E. Malaniuk, O. Ol'zhych. All of these portraits appear in the main section in v.1; a group photo of members of VAPLITE is reproduced at 1: 1048. Additional portraits of Ukrainian writers P. Kulish, T. Shevchenko, O. Dovzhenko, M. Sadovs'kyi, O. Saksahans'kyi, I. Karpenko-Karyi appear in v.2 in the sections on painting, graphic arts and cinematography.

A877. "Literature. Comment on foreign writings. Writing about Vsesvit in 1969..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 10.

An eleven-line digest of an article that appeared in Literaturna Ukraina on 13 January 1970 [author not named]. The article complained about Vsesvit's editorial policy of not publishing Ukrainian translations of books which have already appeared in Russian.

A878. "Literature. Criticism: Referring to V.I. Shevchuk's Karel Čapek: Antyfashysts'ki tvory (Kiev), H. Konovalov..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 7.

Digest of an article published originally in Literaturna Ukraina on 9 January 1970, p.3. [11 lines].

A879. "Literature. Translations: Chairman of the Ukrainian Society for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Abroad..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 10.

An 11-line digest of an article published in Literaturna Ukraina on 20 January 1970 at p.2. The article complains about unused opportunities to publish Ukrainian literature abroad. Gallimard is named as having requested 20-25 contemporary Ukrainian novels for publication in French. Author's name is not given. A880. "Literature. Translations: The holding of seminars in the Ukraine..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 9.

About a seminar for foreign translators of Ukrainian literature. A 6-line digest of an article published in Literaturna Ukraina on 9 January 1970, p.1.

A881. "Literature. Translations: A report has been addressed to the plenum of the Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 9-10.

The report (published originally in Literaturna Ukraina on 16 January 1970, pp. 2-3) complained about insufficient projection of Ukrainian literature abroad and poor representation of Ukrainian literature among publications issued by Progress Publishers in Moscow and in the journal Soviet Literature. (A 30-line digest).

A882. "Literature. Translations: Ukrainian literature is very little known abroad..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 9.

A 30-line digest of an article published in Literaturna Ukraina on 13 January 1970 at p.3. The article complained about insufficient translations of Ukrainian literature into foreign languages and about the attempts by Dnipro Publishers to remedy the situation.

A883. "Literature. Translations: The Ukrainian monthly Vsesvit..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 26 (April 1970): 8-9.

An 18-line digest of an article about Vsesvit published originally in Literaturna Ukraina on 9 January 1970, p.1.

A884. "Literaturna Ukraina". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 14 (1977): 561.

About the Ukrainian literary newspaper that was founded in 1927 and was, according to this entry "the first newspaper of its kind in the USSR." (13 lines).

A885. ["Little Taras from the script for 'Heritage 73']." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.556 (49) (March 1973): 29-33. illus.

Vignettes from the poetry and boyhood of Taras Shevchenko, presented on stage by the narrator, reader, Canadian children with their mother, little Taras and Oxana. Includes excerpts of Shevchenko's poetry, i.e. "I was thirteen, I herded lambs" (50 lines), "Old Perebendya, minstrel blind" (28 lines). No author, translator or title is supplied. The title in brackets is from the contents page of the issue.

A886. Litvinov, Volodimir. "Vast treasury of thought." Ukraine. 3(7) (1971): 16. port.

About the life and work of Teofan Prokopovych [Theophan Prokopovich in text], with his portrait. Prokopovych is characterized as "the noted Ukrainian philosopher, historian, cleric and statesman." According to Litvinov "Prokopovich propagated the best achievements in the theory of world literature of his days. Unlike the classicists who advocated a strict adherence to literary genres, he proposed to blend opposing genre categories in one work, as in the tragicomedy. He applied his poetic principles to his tragicomedy Vladimir, the first drama in Ukrainian as well as in Russian literature, which was based not on the traditional themes from the lives of the saints, but on the author's current realities."

A887. Litvinov, Volodimir. "Vast treasury of thought." Ukrainian Canadian. 27.575 (68) (December 1974): 37-40. illus., port.

About Teofan Prokopovych [Theophan Prokopovich in text]. Apparently, a reprint from Ukraine. [cf. A886].

A888. "Loboda, Andrey Mitrofanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 353.

Bio-bibliographical data (19 lines) about Andrii Loboda, folklorist and literary historian (b.26 June 1871, d.1 January 1931).

A889. "The lofty civic responsibility of the artist. Resolution of the joint meeting of the Presidiums of the Executive Boards of the Creative Unions of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 36-37. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 May 1973): 3].

The resolution calls for using the plans for literature and art outlined by the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and presented in L.I. Brezhnev's report as "the basis of the creative, ideological, civic and organizational work of the unions, of their printed organs, of their oblast branches..."

A890. Lohvynenko, Anatolii. "'Momentum' is gathering momentum." / Anatoliy Lohvynenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 21-23. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (2 July 1976): 3].

About a readers' conference of scientists and oblast writers' organizations held in Kharkiv to discuss Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi's novel Rozhin. The participants expressed their appreciation of the novel and gave some critical comments. Among the critical remarks: "unsatisfactory depiction of the specific scientific and industrial environment", "unconvincing nature of certain episodes". The Digest's title reads: "Cybernetics confer on Zahrebel'nyy's new novel."

A891. Lord, Albert B. "The dumy and the South Slavic epic tradition." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974-1975. 5 (1974-1975): 29-31. Biblio.

Summary of the paper presented by Harvard University professor Albert B. Lord at the general seminar on 14 November 1974 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, according to this summary, examined the differences and similarities between the Balkan or Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian oral epic and the Ukrainian dumy in terms of metrical systems, instruments used in performance and the use of formulaic expression.

A892. Loshchits, Iu.M. "Skovoroda, Grigorii Savvich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 23 (1979): 511. Biblio.

Over half-a-page (78 lines) about Hryhorii Skovoroda (1722-1794), "Ukrainian philosopher, poet and pedagogue". Skovoroda's literary manner, according to the author, "is characterized by expressive imagery, by striking transitions from the passionate to the humorous or the grotesque, and by an abundance of metaphors, antitheses, recurring images and symbols."

A893. Luchka, Ivan. "The princess and the poet." Forum. 9 (Summer 1969): 14-15, 18-24. illus.

The story of Shevchenko's relationship with Princess Varvara Repnina. The article consists mainly of long excerpts of Varvara Repnina's letters to her friend in Switzerland, Charles Eynard, interspersed with explanatory comments by the author. The article is illustrated with Shevchenko's self-portrait presented to Repnina in 1843 (full page at 14), Varvara Repnina's portrait by Hlafira Psyol (p.15), portrait of Prince M. Repnin by Joseph Hornung which Shevchenko was commissioned to copy in 1843, views of the country house of Prince Repnin in Yahotyn, children of Varvara Repnina's brother painted by Shevchenko in 1844 (full page at 23), as well as a view of the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts and of the title page of the first edition of Kobzar.

A894. Luciw, Theodore. "Shevchenko's influence on Honcharenko." In his Father Agapius Honcharenko, First Ukrainian Priest in America. New York: Ukrainian Congress Committee of America, 1970. 24-25.

Ahapius Honcharenko is credited with the publication of the first mention of Shevchenko in the English language press. [See ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965: A108]. Luciw's book length biography of Honcharenko contains some material relevant to Ukrainian literature, i.e. an unattributed translation of the "Song of kozak Baida (Hey! Young Baida drinks mead-whiskey strong) (pp. 9-11), an excerpt from another duma "A poor slave in Turkey sends greetings" (p.11); a chapter entitled: "The Brotherhood of Sts. Cyril and Methodius: rise of Ukrainian literary nationalism" (pp. 19-20) and the chapter on Shevchenko's influence listed above which has some notes on Shevchenko's life and a few lines of quotations from his poetry. Among the book's illustrations, photographs of Honcharenko, etc. there is also a small portrait of Shevchenko on p.180.

A895. Luckyj, George S.N. "The archetype of the bastard in Ševčenko's poetry." Slavic and East European Journal. 14.3 (Fall 1970): 277-283. Notes.

An attempt to apply the Jungian precepts of archetypes ("The contents of the collective unconscious...") to Taras Shevchenko's poetry. Luckyj discusses some of Shevchenko's archetypal motifs, especially the archetype of the mother as a seduced girl, a "pokrytka", and the related archetype of her illegitimate child - the bastard. The bastard - frequently as a tragic figure - appears in a number of Shevchenko poems, notably in "Prychynna", "Utoplena", "Kateryna", "Naimychka", "Osyka", "Tytarivna", "Maryna", "U nashim rai na zemli", "Haidamaky" and "Mariia", all of which are analyzed by the author. 14 lines of "Mariia" quoted in the original are given literal prose translation in English on p. 282 ("All my hope in").

A896. Luckyj, George S.N. "Dmytro Ivanovych Chyzhevs'kyi, 1894-1977." Slavic Review. 36.3 (September 1977): 550-551.

An obituary article about the eminent Slavic scholar (born 23 March 1894 in Oleksandria, Ukraine; died in Heidelberg, Germany, on 18 April 1977). Chyzhevs'kyi is characterized by Luckyj as a "truly cosmopolitan European." "Chyzhevs'kyi's contribution to Slavic studies has indeed been monumental", says Luckyj, "he was as much at home in Czech and Slovak literature as in Russian and Ukrainian; he was a literary critic and historian, as well as a linguist and philosopher. The breadth of his knowledge was phenomenal, and he had the rare gift of grasping the essential and relating his findings in a new and illuminating way." [Chyzhevs'kyi was known also as Čiževskij or Tschižewskij].

A897. Luckyj, George S.N. "Introduction." Vaplitians'kyi zbirnyk. Vyd.2-e, dop. pid red. Iuriia Luts'koho. Z nahody piatdesiatyrichchia VAPLITE. Oakville, Ont.: Published for the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies by Mosaic Press, 1977. 7-26.

A reprint, with minor editorial changes regarding transliteration, of the first study in English of VAPLITE, the Free Academy of Proletarian Literature, based on the unpublished records of this organization preserved among the private papers of Arkadii Liubchenko. The study was published originally in Harvard Slavic Studies [3 (1957): 227-246)] under the title "The battle for literature in the Soviet Ukraine: a documentary study of VAPLITE, 1925-1928" and was also issued as a separate offprint. [For annotations see ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B37 and ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A402].

A898. Luckyj, George S.N. "Polarity in Ukrainian intellectual dissent." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.2 (Summer 1972): 269-279.

The polarity, as seen by Luckyj, is between those critics of the Soviet regime who, like Ivan Dziuba, point out the discrepancies between Soviet theory and practice taking Marxism- Leninism as their point of reference and influencing public opinion more or less openly and those ardent nationalists, like Valentyn Moroz, who pay for their views with imprisonment and can only influence public opinion through the underground. "The divergence between Dziuba's and Moroz's views exemplifies not only the rift in the Ukrainian resistance but also the dilemma of the intellectual dissent in general", says Luckyj. "It is only possible to say that at the moment there is room in the Ukraine for both points of view and that the polarity between them is a positive fact. It enables many dissenters to express differing opinions which do not necessarily coincide with those of either Dziuba or Moroz." A brief French resume of this article appears on p.279.

A899. Luckyj, George S.N. "Ševčenko and Blake." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.1 (March 1978): 94-115.

A comparative study of Taras Shevchenko and the English poet William Blake. "Both Blake and Ševčenko are mythopoic poets," says Luckyj. "On its deepest level, their work represents a vision of life composed of archetypes." According to Luckyj, "a special affinity exists between the components of this vision in Ševčenko's and Blake's poetry... Moreover, the visionary and anthropocentric qualities of their writings distinguish these two poets from many other Romantic poets." Luckyj discusses the main archetypes in Shevchenko's poetry: images of seduced woman, of the wise old man - the minstrel or kobzar, of the warrior-cossack. Luckyj finds Blake's counterparts to Shevchenko's seduced woman and his archetypes dolia-nedolia, volia-nevolia, pravda-nepravda - innocence and experience, love and hate, freedom and slavery, fall and eden. "The never-ending conflict between good and evil, God and Satan, freedom and oppression that Ševčenko writes about is also the central theme of Blake's poetry," says Luckyj. "And although the details of the vision of these two poets differ, as does their poetic expression, striking similarities exist between them. Both are visionary or 'oracular' poets, both create mythologems from partly national... and partly biblical material, both rebel against the existing social order and enunciate moral principles to a far greater extent than do their contemporaries, and both are vatic poets." The article is interspersed with quotations from Shevchenko's poetry in Ukrainian with literal English translation by the author. The longer fragments are: In our earthly paradise = U nashim rai na zemli (11 lines, p.99); I am alone, quite alone = Oi odna ia, odna (16 lines, p.101); The thick braids unwound = Rozplelasia husta kosa (17 lines, p.102); With a slim waist and beauty = I stanom hnuchkym i krasoiu (17 lines, p.103); My dear God = Mii Bozhe mylyi (from "Maryna", 10 lines, p.105); The old man hid = Staryi zakhovavsia (from "Perebendia", 25 lines, p.107-108).

A900. Luckyj, George S.N. "Some practical problems of Ukrainian literary studies." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. 4 (1973-1974): 82-85.

A summary of the paper presented on May 2, 1974 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed the declining linguistic competence in Ukrainian among young scholars in North America, the "incompleteness of Ukrainian literary criticism and scholarship and the large gaps in the continuity of the Ukrainian literary tradition which are reflected in research and scholarship", and the vital needs for basic, comprehensive studies of Ukrainian literature and for competent English translations of Ukrainian literary texts.

A901. Luckyj, George S.N. "To the editors." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.3 (September 1978): 391-392.

A rebuttal of George G. Grabowicz's review-article of Chyzhevs'kyi's A History of Ukrainian Literature: From the 11th to the End of the 19th century [cf. B006] which was edited by G.S.N. Luckyj. The Grabowicz review-article appeared under the title "Toward a history of Ukrainian literature" in Harvard Ukrainian Studies, [cf. A405] and was later issued in 1981 as a separate book in the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute monograph series [cf.ULE: 1980-1989, B046].

A902. Luckyj, George S.N. "Translations, translations!" / George Luckyj. Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 2.1 (Spring 1977): 104-106.

A polemic response to M. C. [Marco Carynnyk]'s review of Luckyj's translation of Sonata Pathetique by Mykola Kulish. [cf. R127.1].

A903. Luckyj, George S.N. "Turmoil in the Ukraine." / George Luckyj. Problems of Communism. 17.4 (July-August 1968): 14-20.

Among the subjects discussed by George Luckyj are: 1/ the young poets of Ukraine, the so called "shestydesiatnyky", whose impact, in his view, is mainly "on a universal esthetic plane" and whose protest "is expressed in human rather than national terms"; 2/ the fire at the Academy of Sciences Library in Kyiv on 24 May 1964, which he witnessed himself; 3/ the cult of Vasyl Symonenko whose works were circulated clandestinely; 4/ arrests and persecutions in 1961 and 1965 of Ukrainian intelligentsia; 5/ the documents of Viacheslav Chornovil Lykho z rozumu, published in Paris in 1967 in Ukrainian; and 6/ Ivan Dziuba's Internationalism or Russification, published in English, in London in 1968 [cf. B018].

A904. Luckyj, George S.N. "The Ukrainian literary scene today." Slavic Review. 31.4 (December 1972): 863-869.

A critical survey of Ukrainian literature from 1960 to 1972. Luckyj writes about the poets called shestydesiatnyky (Kostenko, Drach, Korotych, Vinhranovs'kyi, Symonenko) whose greatest achievement, in his view, was "the rediscovery of the function of poetry" and whose very appearance "out of a sea of mediocrity and conformism proves the vitality of Ukrainian literature". He calls attention to "a flood of historical fiction" (Zahrebel'nyi et al.), to younger promising writers such as Hutsalo, Valerii Shevchuk and Iurii Shcherbak, to achievements in the field of translation from foreign literature (Mykola Lukash, Borys Ten, Hryhorii Kochur) and to the impact of intellectual dissent and the prominent role in that dissent of writers such as Chornovil, Osadchyi, Dziuba, Sverstiuk and Valentyn Moroz. Among the poets whose work is disseminated in underground publications, Luckyj mentions Kalynets', Holoborod'ko, Hryhorii Chubai and Vasyl' Stus.

A905. Luckyj, George S.N. "Ukrainian literature." / George Luckyj. Encyclopedia of World Literature in the 20th century. Gen. ed. Wolfgang Bernard Fleischmann. New York: F. Ungar. 3 (1971): 445-448. Biblio.

A survey of Ukrainian literature from Slovo o polku Ihorevim in the medieval Kyivan Rus to the contemporary modernist New York Group of Ukrainian émigré poets. Luckyj discusses briefly the romantics, the realists, the romantic and ethnographic tradition in Ukrainian drama, the process of europeanization, modernism, the nationalist writers in exile and socialist realism in Soviet Ukraine, but his main emphasis is on Ukrainian literature of the 1920's, which, according to Luckyj, "showed great vitality", but the period "was marked by the most violent purges of cultural and literary organizations... [which] resulted in a severe struggle between the regime, which was intent on achieving conformity and obedience at any price, and the Ukrainian writers and scholars, who forcefully resisted the dictates of the party." In the 1930's the Soviet purge of Ukrainian writers, says Luckyj, "claimed more than one hundred victims. Among them Khvyl'ovyi, who shot himself in 1933, and many other writers of the first rank... The arrest and deportation of [the playwright] Kulish was the single greatest loss to Soviet Ukrainian literature."

A906. Luckyj, George S.N. "Ukrainian literature." Discordant Voices: the Non-Russian Soviet Literatures, 1953-1973. George S.N. Luckyj, ed. Oakville, Ont.: Mosaic Press, 1975. 127-144.

After Stalin's death in 1953 new trends began to appear in Soviet Ukrainian literature, says Luckyj. The rehabilitation of Soviet Ukrainian writers who perished in the 1930's in Stalinist purges and some publication of their works encouraged and influenced the younger generation of writers. The poets of the sixties (Drach, Kostenko, Symonenko, Korotych, Vinhranovs'kyi) "vigorously objected to the simplistic Soviet view of life and rediscovered human anguish and suffering, as well as the fragility of human relationships. Symonenko's commitment to social and national problems led to a veritable cult among the young. Other poets "may be classed as 'modernists' since to them the form and language of their poems were of primary importance. L. Kostenko, the leader of this group, is known for "the quiet exploratory, inward-evolving orientation of her best poems". "Drach's 'thirst' for discovering reality as it is, unvarnished by ideology, compels the reader to look at things in a new light and to think independently". The poets of the sixties found a large following among the young and even had some influence on the older generation of Ukrainian writers. Luckyj claims that "revival of Ukrainian poetry in the 1960's was not accompanied by any resurgence of prose." Among the exceptional prose works worth noting, he singles out Pervomais'kyi's Dykyi med, whose merit, according to Luckyj, lies in its structure and restraint, Honchar's Sobor, which centers on the problem of historical awareness, but is, in Luckyj's view, "inferior in style". Among historical novelists who try a more sophisticated approach ["which often falls flat"] Luckyj singles out Zahrebel'nyi and his novel Dyvo ["replete with false profundity"]. There is "crude propaganda", says Luckyj, in novels dealing with life on collective farms (e.g. novels by Stel'makh) - one exception, despite tendentiousness is, in Luckyj's view, Vyr by Hryhorii Tiutiunnyk, "which shows real talent". "The present state of Ukrainian prose", says Luckyj," is full of problems. The narrow formulae of socialist realism keeps it structurally on the level of second rate 19th century fiction. These innovations which were made in the novel in the 1920's (Yanovsky, Pidmohylny) have been wiped out. Yet in spite of the dullness of the average novel, attempts are being made by younger writers to widen the limits of socialist realism. Two prose writers, in particular, have demonstrated that they have the potential to create a different realistic style. They are Valerii Shevchuk... and Yurii Shcherbak..." Luckyj also provides a survey of the literature of dissent beginning with the late 1960's and of the repressions that followed. Chornovil, Sverstiuk and Valentyn Moroz (the latter characterized as one of the best "contemporary protest writers in any literature") are discussed in this context. Underground publishing has produced also such poets as Ihor Kalynets ["great poetic virtuosity", "free of overt political themes"], Mykola Vorobiov, Vasyl' Holoborod'ko, Hryhorii Chubai and Vasyl' Stus ["less sophisticated" in Luckyj's view, but "excels as a lyricist"].

A907. Luckyj, George S.N. "Ukrainian literature". World Literature Since 1945: critical surveys of the contemporary literatures of Europe and the Americas. Ed. by Ivar Ivask & Gero von Wilpert. New York: F. Ungar [©1973]. 668- 673. Biblio.

A critical survey of Ukrainian literature after World War II. "Ukrainian literature of the period 1945-70 can best be studied in its various themes, as they reflect or run contrary to the official ideology", says Luckyj. "Strict conformity to the principles of socialist realism prevailed" until Stalin's death in 1953. Then new trends emerged and some of the writers who perished in the decades of terror were partially rehabilitated. Still the official doctrine of literature as "socialist in content and national in form" meant in practice, according to Luckyj, "that Ukrainian literature was dependent on Russian models", that a great deal of it was "crudely propagandist..." and of low quality. The significant exception, according to Luckyj, is the poetry written in the 1960's, with its greater sophistication in both language and style and its "desire to turn away from political ideology toward universal themes." Among writers reflecting the official ideology Luckyj mentions briefly Honchar, Pervomaiskyi, Ryl's'kyi, Panch, Ilchenko, Skliarenko; he singles out as especially noteworthy despite some tendentiousness: Tiutiunnyk, Ianovskyi, Dovzhenko, Smolych, and among the poets of the 1960's - Kostenko, Drach, Korotych, Symonenko and Vinhranovs'kyi. Luckyj mentions the arrests among the writers in the mid 1960's and discusses briefly Ukrainian writers in exile.

A908. Luhova, A. "The golden ring". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.8 (August 1970): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vil'na Ukraina (20 May 1970): 3].

The Digest's title: "Forgotten opera of the 20's performed in Lviv". About the opera "Zolotyi obruch" by B. Liatoshyns'kyi [Lyatoshynskyy in text], with libretto by Ia. Mamontov based on Ivan Franko's novel Zakhar Berkut.

A909. "Lukash, Mykola Oleksiyovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 60-61.

About the dissident activities of the translator and scholar Mykola Lukash. (15 lines).

A910. "Lukash, Nikolay Alekseevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 359.

Bio-bibliographical data (18 lines) about the poet and translator Mykola Lukash, born 1919.

A911. Lukianenko, H. "The golden bridges of friendship" / H. Lukyanenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.11 (November 1974): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 October 1974): 2].

About translations of Mykola Bazhan's poetry into Polish, Bulgarian, Czech and German. Andrei Germanov, the Bulgarian translator, and Peter Kirchner, the German translator, are mentioned by name; the Polish and Czech translators are not named.

A912. Lukin, Yuri. "Poetic prose (On the sixtieth birthday of Mikhail Stelmakh)." Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 6(291) (1972): 148-152.

"Typical of Mikhail Stelmakh's historical revolutionary novels is his striving to grasp the essence of historical change, to understand the grandeur of the spirit of the toiling people and to convey the wealth of their inner experience and the justice of their aspirations," says Lukin. In Stel'makh's works, according to the author, "the individual artistic experience of the writer emerges enriched by the broad and rich experience of the traditions of Ukrainian national culture. From a single common ideological and philosophical foundation spring works marked by the originality of the creative personality of the artist who produced them."

A913. "Lupiy, Oles Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 371-372.

Bio-bibliographical note (14 lines) about Oles' Lupii, poet, writer and playwright born 1938.

A914. "Lupynis, Anatoliy Ivanovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 62.

Ten lines about dissident activity of the poet Anatolii Lupynis.

A915. Lutsiv, Luka. "The "literary alliance" of Stefanyk and Martovych." / Luke Luciw. Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 274-275.

An English summary of an article that appears in Ukrainian on p.107-111. The article deals with the alleged partnership of Vasyl' Stefanyk and Les' Martovych that supposedly resulted in their joint authorship of Nechytalnyk and Lumera. Lutsiv concludes that both of these works "are marked by the stylistic characteristics of Martovych and not of Stefanyk".

A916. Lutsiv, Volodymyr. "Kobza-bandura and Dumy and their significance in the history of the Ukrainian people." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.1 (Spring 1966): 53-70. illus.

The first part of the article discusses the origin and external appearance of the musical instrument kobza and is illustrated with three pages of drawings of the instrument, as well as the author's portrait playing the bandura. Pp. 58-64 are devoted to dumy - their collectors, publications and performers. Lutsiv cites at length the work of the dumy scholar Filaret Kolessa and provides a series of quotations on the dumy from Shevchenko, Gogol, Dobrolyubov, Tolstoy, K.V. Zapa, Friedrich Bodenstedt, Alfred Rambeau, Panteleimon Kulish. The article is interspersed with some excerpts of the dumy in a literal English translation.

A917. Lysenko, Oleksandr. "Hrihoriy Skovoroda - outstanding Ukrainian philosopher and poet of the 18th century." / Olexandr Lysenko. Ukraine. 4 (12) (1972): [24-25], port.

Commemorating the 250th anniversary of birth of Hryhorii Skovoroda (3 December 1722 - 9 November 1794). This is how Lysenko interprets Skovoroda's views: "According to Skovoroda's philosophy, man, both in his being (epistemologically) and in his attitude to the world (gnoseologically), constitutes a part of nature, its 'microcosm'. Nothwithstanding man's 'divine' nature, this nature does not remain unchangeable. Skovoroda held that kindness, wisdom, love, and, consequently, happiness do not exist ready-made, but become shaped in the process of life and, mainly, through work. Wisdom is not an innate quality, but rather a life experience illuminating the paths of man." The article is illustrated with a large linocut portrait of Skovoroda by V. Chebanik.

A918. "Lyubchenko, Arkadiy Afanas'yevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 361.

Bio-bibliographical data (9 lines) about the writer Arkadii Liubchenko (1899-1945).

A919. Lyubchenko, H. "To whom has the heart been given: Concerning the writer's class approach to life". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.6 (June 1973): 25-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Robitnycha hazeta (27 April 1973): 2-3].

A negative review of I. Bilyk's Mech Areia, V. Malyk's Posol urus-shaitana, and O. Berdnyk"s Zorianyi korsar. In Bilyk's book the reviewer finds "fog of scientifically uncorraborated mystical symbolism and concepts, priority over the portrayal of actual social relations... overt influence of profoundly alien bourgeois nationalist theories..."; in Malyk's book: "social idealization of Zaporozhian Sich and the Cossack brotherhood", in Berdnyk he finds idealism, concentration on the elite, the technocrats, the intellectual minority with common people either absent or "portrayed as an inert passive mass, which is degenerating". The Digest's title: "Bilyk, Malyk and Berdnyk charged with voicing 'alien bourgeois views' in their works."

A920. Mackiw, Theodore. "A biographical sketch of Taras Shevchenko." Ukrainian Review (London). 25.2 (Summer 1978): 32-43.

A detailed factual biography of the poet who, according to this historian's characterization, "lived a life of tribulation and sorrow."

A921. Makarov, Anatolii. "The poet seeks modernity." / Anatoliy Makarov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.5 (May 1966): 18-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Dnipro. 3 (March 1966): 147-155].

"There is no other poet who is growing more rapidly and surely than Drach, who would be creatively more energetic and courageous," says Makarov. The critic credits Drach with introducing many original ideas into poetry, for his philosophical lyricism and historical awareness, and "a peculiar union of artistic and scientific thinking". "The themes of his verses", says Makarov about Drach, "do not leave anyone indifferent, everybody is moved by them, although in different ways. No matter what we say about the poetry of Drach, it is one of the significant events of our cultural life..." A comment added to the article by the editors of Dnipro takes issue with some statements and calls on the readers to continue the discussion on Ivan Drach's poetry. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Critic places Drach at top among new poets."

A922. Makhnovets', Leonid. "In Skovoroda's hand". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 25-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 July 1972): 2].

Makhnovets' reports on his discovery of the previously unknown records about Hryhorii Skovoroda as a teacher of poetics and of syntax at the Kharkiv Collegium in the years 1759-1760 and 1763-1764. The Digest's title: "Find school records signed by Skovoroda".

A923. "Maksimovich, Mikhail Aleksandrovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 15 (1977): 349. Biblio.

An unsigned bio-bibliographical note of 28 lines about Mykhailo Maksymovych (1804- 1873), characterized by the GSE as a "Ukrainian botanist, folklorist and historian". Maksymovych compiled and published in 1834 a collection of Ukrainian folk songs and translated Slovo o polku Ihorevim into Ukrainian.

A924. "Maksym Rylsky." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 25.7-8 (295) (July-August 1974): 23.

An unsigned bio-bibliographical note about Maksym Ryl's'kyi.

A925. Maksymenko, Hryhoriy. "In the forefront." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.5 (May 1972): 15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 March 1972): 2].

Maksymenko, secretary of the Central Committee of Komsomol of Ukraine speaks of the need for political education of young writers and of the Komsomol plan to send them to various construction projects, so that the writers can "observe customs, characters and preferences" of "the people... engaged in truly heroic feats." The Digest's title: "Komsomol secretary calls for intensification of ideological education of young writers."

A926. Malanchuk, V.Yu. "The ideological sources of literature". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 11-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vitchyzna. 12 (December 1973): 1-16].

Malanchuk, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine and a candidate member of the Politburo, spoke at the general meeting of communists of the Kyiv branch of the Writers Union of Ukraine Malanchuk singles out as particularly praiseworthy the books Duma pro tebe by Stel'makh, Tsyklon by Honchar, Buimyr by Kost' Hordiienko [Hordiyenko], Ulianovy by V. Kanivets', Blyskavka by V. Kozachenko, Z pohliadu vichnosti by Zahrebel'nyi, Pochesnyi lehion by Vadym Sobko, Soldaty bez mundyriv by Natan Rybak, Kanal by Ivan Hryhurko and D. Bedzyk's trilogy about the revolutionary transformation in West Ukraine [no title given]. He expresses his dissatisfaction, however, with "a certain degree of alienation from the real world" in poetry, with "petty philosophizing, juggling with abstract-humanistic categories and art for art's sake in prose, with "primitivism, psychological oversimplification and artistic imperfection" in dramaturgy, with "an unhealthy tendency to litter the language with obsolete words and dialecticisms", with "serious mistakes and erroneous tendencies" in the work of critics Marharyta Malynovska, Ievhen Adelheim [Yevhen Adelheym] and others. Appraisals of such figures as Drahomanov, Kostomarov, M. Skrypnyk, Ellan-Blakytnyi, according to Malanchuk, require "an objective class evaluation", because of "attempts to idealize figures whose ideo-political views necessarily evoke serious reservations". Title supplied by the Digest reads: "Malanchuk on ideological orthodoxy in literature."

A927. Malaniuk, Evhen. "Ivan Franko as a manifestation of the intellect." Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 16-21. ports.

"It is worthwhile to return again and again to Franko's reason," says Malaniuk, "for in its full creative force it was the pure expression of our national intellect..." According to Malaniuk, modern Ukrainian national thought "was fanned into flame by Panko Kulish, smouldered gently, and finally went out again with Drahomanov. When in the eighties and nineties the chasm of provincialism refused to close and 'national non-existence' blossomed forth, it was Franko who strengthened, deepened and extended Kulish's intellectual prologue, and brought us" [i.e. the Ukrainians] "a huge step forward along the often difficult and unpleasant path of national thought." The aricle is illustrated with two full page b/w portraits of Franko: one - a photograph from 1875, the other - a reproduction of a painting by Ivan Trush.

A928. Malynovs'ka, Marharyta. "A poem of life." / Malinovskaya, Margarita. Tr. by Vladimir Talmy. Soviet Literature. 11 (344) (1976): 153-157.

A review article of Liudyna u sebe vdoma, a 1974 book of essays-travelogues by Vitalii Korotych, characterized by the author as a "documentary novel-cum-essay".

A929. Malynovs'ka. Marharyta. "A philosopher of the people". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.1 (January 1970): 17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (11 November 1969): 4].

Skovoroda is characterized as a "philosopher-poet". "... his works travelled with him from village to village, from old to young, like a tireless wanderer. None of them appeared in print during his lifetime. But hundreds of kobzars and bandura-players sang his songs and poems, many of them became folk songs..." says Malynovs'ka. Digest's title: "Skovoroda eulogized on the 175th anniversary of his death."

A930. "Malyshko, Andrey Samoylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 383.

A bio-bibliographical note of 68 lines about the poet Andrii Malyshko (born 1912).

A931. "The man-breaking regime: case of Ukrainian writer. (Editorial). Ukrainian Quarterly. 30.1 (Spring 1974): 5-12.

An editorial about Ivan Dziuba who had been sentenced in March 1973 to ten years in prison and exile for his book Internationalism or Russification and who has been pardoned by the Soviet regime after a recantation of his views. Says the editor: "Dzyuba's 'confession' undoubtedly has not changed his image in the eyes of the Ukrainian people. The Bolshevik regime is still hard-pressed indeed if it calculates that the entire background - esthetic, moral and political - of a man like Dzyuba can be offset by a scrap of paper."

A932. Manning, Clarence A. "Ivan Franko." Kalendar-al'manakh na 1966 rik. U 110-richchia narodzennia i 50-richchia smerty Ivana Franka. / Ukrains'kyi Narodnyi Soiuz; Naukove Tovarystvo im. Shevchenka v ZDA. Jersey City, N.J. : Svoboda, 1966. 91-95. port.

Manning calls Franko the "voice of Western Ukraine", the "spokesman for his people" and says: "... Franko undoubtedly reaches the heights in his philosophical poems, in Ivan Vyshensky and in Moses. These need not fear comparison with the great poems of other languages and literatures and belong truly to the literature of the world." The volume, issued on the occasion of the 110 anniversary of Franko's birth and 50th anniversary of his death, contains several portraits of Franko and other relevant illustrations (photographs, paintings, autographs, monuments, museums, group photos of Franko with his wife, with Ukrainian writers Kobylians'ka, Hnatiuk, Kotsiubyns'kyi, as well as a photograph of Franko's love - Celina Zygmuntowska).

A933. Manning, Clarence A. "Ivan Franko, 1856-1916." Forum. 1.1 (Winter 1967): 10-12. illus., port.

A condensed version of a chapter in Manning's book Ukrainian Literature. In this chapter Manning points out the differences between Shevchenko and Franko: the natural genius, self-educated son of a serf, the romantic poet with a tragic life story and the talented and well- educated hardworking journalist and editor with superhuman energy. Manning provides a detailed biography of Franko. The article is illustrated with a large b/w portrait of Ivan Franko, photos of his house in Lviv, of his desk and of the monument on his grave at the Lychakivskyi cemetery in Lviv. Five lines from "Stone Cutters"- "And so we moved ahead, united as one man" are quoted on p.11 in an unattributed translation.

A934. Manning, Clarence A. "Ivan Kotlyarevsky." Ukrainian Quarterly. 26.2 (Summer 1970): 164-170.

"By the time that Kotlyarevsky had finished his work," says Manning, "he had carried Ukrainian tastes through the remainder of the eighteenth century classical period and the Romantic period and adopted the language and the audience to a new art, even if he had not developed it to its full capacity." According to Manning, Kotliarevs'kyi, although "a primary figure in the development of modern Ukrainian literature, yet the controversy that has grown about him, his objects and his goal in his lifetime has never been answered conclusively by either his admirers or his detractors..." The article has three quotations from Eneida in apparently the author's own translation: "Aeneas was a clever fellow" (10 lines, p.166), "For Virgil, may he reign forever" (10 lines, p.167), "Aeneas, noster magnus panus" (10 lines, p.168).

A935. Manning, Clarence A. "The role of Franko". Ivan Franko: Collected Papers Commemorating the 110th Anniversary of the Birth and the 50th Anniversary of the Death of Ivan Franko. Pt.2. Editor: B. Steciuk. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1968. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v.184). 159-167. Biblio.

Manning focuses on the "social consequences of Franko's work", on the writer's role in the "revival of the spirit of the Western Ukrainians" by making them conscious of their unity with Ukrainians then living under the rule of the Russian empire. Manning's article is the only one in English in this collection of papers: all other articles are in Ukrainian.

A936. Manning, Clarence A. "Taras Shevchenko as a world poet." Promin'. 18.3 (March 1977): 19-21, port.; 18.4 (April 1977): 15-18. illus.

Shevchenko's poetry, says Manning, "is one long exposition of the beauty, of the history, of the tragedy of Ukraine, and he might seem at first sight to be only a poet of his people. Yet as we read him further, we see that he is dealing with even a greater subject than Ukraine and that is the fate of humanity with all of the varied emotions of the human heart." The article, apparently a reprint of the one published originally in Ukrainian Quarterly in February 1945 [cf. ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A448] is interspersed with fragments of Shevchenko's poetry in Manning's translation. The longer fragments are: "But Taras called to the kozaks" (6 lines); "Look upon the quiet heavens" (12 lines); "Oh, embrace, my dearest brothers" (16 lines). The illustration in the April issue is that of the Shevchenko monument in Washington.

A937. Marchenko, I. "Routes of Ukrainian books." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.9 (September 1970): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (26 July 1970): 2].

In an interview with the author, H.Ya. Demydenko, director of Ukrknyhoeksport, provides the following information: 86 countries receive Ukrainian publications; last year 1.5 million copies were sent abroad. Of these, 628,000 Ukrainian books were sent to Poland. Mystetstvo publishing house published a series of Ukrainian children's books in Spanish and English. Demydenko claims to have received orders for 100,000 copies of these titles. Ukrainian publications are advertized in a bi-annual catalog Novi knyhy Ukrainy. Beginning with 1970, Ukrainian books are listed also in the Mezhdunarodnaya kniga's weekly bulletin Novye knigi SSSR. The Digest's title: "Report increased demand for Ukrainian books abroad".

A938. "Marchenko, Valeriy Venyamynovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 65.

Nine lines about the dissident activities of Valerii Marchenko characterized here as "a writer, journalist and translator".

A939. "Mark centennial of Lesya Ukrainka." Ukrainian Quarterly. 27.4 Autumn 1971): 433.

Twenty-three lines in the "Chronicle of current events" about commemorative observances on the occasion of Lesia Ukrainka's one hundredth birthday held in Cleveland, Ohio, on 18-19 September 1971. Over one thousand people from various parts of the country participated. The two day program featured a stage presentation of Lesia Ukrainka's work Orhiia. Main address was delivered by Yar Slavutych.

A940. "Marko Cheremshina (1874-1927)." Ukrainian Canadian. 26.570 (63) (June 1974): 34. port.

An article about Marko Cheremshyna on the occasion of the writer's birth centennial to accompany the translation of his story "The cure" published in the same issue. [cf. T033]. The article discusses the plans for the Cheremshyna jubilee in the USSR and characterizes him as an "outstanding Ukrainian democratic writer, cultural and public figure".

A941. "Marko Vovchok." Promin'. 10.5 (May 1969): 15. Port.

An unsigned biographical note, with portrait.

A942. "Marko Vovchok." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 28.7-8 (326) (July-August 1977): 22. port.

A brief unsigned bio-bibliographical note with portrait on the occasion of the 120th anniversary of publication of Marko Vovchok's Narodni opovidannia.

A943. Marshall, Herbert. "Soviet national poets: Ukrainian: Maxim Rylski". Bulletin of the Center for Soviet and East European Studies. 9 (Spring 1972): [1].

This unsigned half-a-column biographical note of Maksym Ryl's'kyi accompanies Marshall's translation of Ryl's'kyi's poem "Zymovi zapysy" (Winter tales).[cf. T336].

A944. Martin, Neil A. "The Brotherhood of SS. Cyril and Methodius, 1845-1846." Ukrainian Quarterly. 22.3 (Autumn 1966): 260-271.

In writing about the Kyrylo-Metodiivs'ke Bratstvo, Neil A. Martin, a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University, finds it regrettable that "there is very little material on the society to be found in English language scholarly publications", because, in his opinion, "the Brotherhood - both as a secret society and as a nationalist movement - merits an important place in the revolutionary movements of the 1840's". He discusses in separate sub-chapters the role and influence of Taras Shevchenko, "The Books of the Genesis of the Ukrainian People", the program of the Brotherhood and the Russian tsarist repressions that led to the termination of its activities.

A945. Marunchak, Michael H. The Ukrainian Canadians: a history. Winnipeg, Ottawa: Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences, 1970. 792 p. illus.

This general history of Ukrainian Canadians includes the following chapters or articles relevant to Ukrainian literature:

1/ "Literature of the pioneers" [pp. 297-308]: A survey of Ukrainian poetry and prose from some verses published in the newspaper Svoboda in 1898-1899 by M. Gowda of Edmonton to an organizing meeting held in Winnipeg on 30 April 1923 which formed the "Association of Writers and Journalists of Canada" where a list of 110 persons was submitted "who in one way or another gave evidence of their writing talents."

2/ "The first book editions, book-stores and publishing establishments" [pp. 309-311]: The first printing establishment, according to Marunchak, that began to publish the first Ukrainian newspaper in Canada was The Canada North-West Company organized in September 1903; the first Ukrainian book (a Ukrainian-English dictionary compiled by I. Bodrug and M. Shcherbinin) was published in Canada in 1904.

3/ "Literature" [pp. 499-504; 529-536]: A survey of Ukrainian writers in Canada between the two world wars. These writers, says Marunchak, "though they followed in the footsteps of the pioneers, began to implant themselves deeper and deeper in the Canadian soil" and "created a bridge for the settlers to acclimatize themselves into the new surroundings." Brief bio- bibliographical data for some 40 writers is provided. The most successful of the group, in the author's opinion, was Illia Kyriiak [Kiriak] (1888-1955). On p.525 Marunchak provides documentary photographs of the following writers: M. Petrovsky, I. Kyriiak [Kiriak], I. Kmeta- Ichnians'kyi [Ichniansky], D.M. Hunkevych, M.I. Mandryka, C.H. Andrusyshen, J. Stechishin, V.J. Kaye-Kysilevsky and H. Ewach.

4/ "Scholars in various fields" [pp.657-663]: Marunchak's survey of post World War II scholars who came to Canada with the so called "third immigration" includes a number of bio- bibliographical notes for literary scholars, such as C. Bida, George S.N. Luckyj, Yar Slavutych and W.T. Zyla.

5/ "Poets and writers" [pp. 664-670]: Bio-bibliographical notes on writers of the post World War II third immigration cover among others: Ulas Samchuk, Yar Slavutych, V. Skorups'kyi [Skorupsky], B. Oleksandriv, F. Odrach, O. Hai-Holovko [Hay-Holovko], M. Prykhod'ko [Prychodko], George Ryga. Portraits of the following writers appear on p. 697: I. I. Bodnarchuk, Y. Slavutych, B. Hoshovskyi [Hoshovsky], M. Podvorniak [Podworniak], Iu. Tarnovych [J. Tarnowych], V. Barabash, U. Samchuk, A.M. Mokh, J. Kolasky, N. Mudryk-Mryts [Mudryk- Mryc], B. Oleksandriv and G. Ryga. Marunchak includes in his survey also writers of Ukrainian descent who write in English.

A946. "Masenko, Teren (real name: Masenko, Terentiy Germanovich)." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 392.

Thirty-six lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet and literary critic Teren' Masenko, born 1903.

A947. Masik, Volodimir. "On the roads of Taras." Forum. 25 (1974): 14-21. illus.

An illustrated report of an artist's sketches of places associated with Taras Shevchenko' s life. Portrait of Volodimir Masik appears on p.15. The following pages have Masik's sketches of the Castle Hill Bonna, The Ostrih Castle, house in Kyiv where Shevchenko lived, fortresses of Korets' and Kamianets'-Podil's'kyi, as well as illustrations to Shevchenko's poetry. Masik's essay about his travels to the various Shevchenko sites was translated by Anatole Bilenko.

A948. Masiutko, Mykhailo. "Ivan Franko - the fighter for freedom and unity of the Ukrainian people." / Mykhailo Masyutko. Ukrainian Review (London). 18.4 (Winter 1971): 70-75.

Reprinted in translation from the journal Dnipro (September 1964). Some of the best works of Franko's literary work and journalism, according to Masiutko, were devoted to "the problem of the future fate of his native land divided by great powers, the destiny of the subjugated and robbed people of Ukraine..." The author attempts to prove his statement by citing excerpts from Franko's poetry which appear here in unattributed literal translations. The longer fragments are: The holy sun was already setting in the West (6 lines, p.70); Rise, take a look, the night is passing [=Sunrise] (12 lines, p.70); It weighs upon me as a bad nightmare (13 lines, p.71); After getting to know her, could I (8 lines, p.71) =[Mylove, Ukraine, 1880]; Let's tear out with roots that discontent (8 lines, p.72); Let it be a poor language in the famous family (16 lines, p.72); Oh, the Haidamaks have sounded loud bells (6 lines, p.74).

A949. Mathiesen, Robert. "A textological note on the works of Vladimir Monomach." Ricerche slavistiche. 16 (1968/1969): 112-125.

About "Poucheniie ditiam" and other works of Prince Volodymyr Monomakh (1053-1125). Says Mathiesen: "Modern scholarship attributes the following works to Vladimir Monomach: an Admonition and autobiography, a Letter to Prince Oleg Svjatoslavič, and a Prayer". All of these, according to the author, were found in the Lavrentiis'kyi litopys, which was completed in 1377. Mathiesen examines at length the text of the "Prayer" (which is reproduced in the original on pp.113-117), claims that "at least two thirds of the Prayer is nothing but one quotation after another", indicates the sources of these quotations and concludes that "traditional attribution of the Prayer to Vladimir Monomach is false."

A950. "Maxim Rylsky (1895-1964)." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.518 (12) (November 1969): 20-21. port.

An unsigned article about Maksym Ryl's'kyi's life and work, which says, in part: "The charm of this great master's poetry lies in the surprisingly affectionate consideration and attention for the human being in particular and in general, for everything around him, for everything that made up his life. He appeals because of the wonderful fusion of the beautiful and useful in his work, for the tender affection he showed toward nature, for his attentive response to all the summons of the times, for his deep commitment to the theme of kinship in the family of man." The article includes 8 lines of Ryl's'kyi's poem "Love nature not as a token" (on p.20) with no translator indicated.

A951. Maznoi, V.I. "Karpenko-Karyi, Ivan Karpovich (pseud. of I.K. Tobilevich)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 11 (1976): 459-460.

Ivan Karpenko-Karyi (1845-1907, real name: Tobilevych) is characterized by this entry as "Ukrainian dramatist, actor and theatrical figure, one of the founders of realistic people's theater in the Ukraine". Karpenko-Karyi's dramatic works, says Maznoi, "are distinguished by a profound knowledge of life, a wealth of dramatic situations, the dynamic nature of the action, and colorful language". The playwright, according to Maznoi, "created a gallery of characters exposing the deep social conflicts of his time." (43 lines + biblio.)

A952. Mazurenko, Hanna. "Hryhoriy Skovoroda, the Socrates of Ukraine." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 23.11-12 (275-276) (November- December 1972): 18.

A note about Skovoroda on the occasion of his 250th birth anniversary. Skovoroda, according to Mazurenko, was a "philosopher, poet and moralist" who prophesied his beliefs in truth, honour and patriotism to the Ukrainian people, harshly castigating hypocrisy and bigotry".

A953. Mazurenko, Hanna. "Saludos Buenos Aires y Republica Argentina." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 23.8 (272) (August 1972): 12- 13; 23.9 (273) (September 1972): 12-13.

A report on a trip to Argentina for the unveiling ceremonies of the Taras Shevchenko monument in Buenos Aires.

A954. Medwidsky, Bohdan. "The language of Stefanyk's novellas: an analysis of the vocabulary." Dissertation Abstracts International. 39.3 (September 1978): 1554-A.

An abstract of a 1978 PhD dissertation at the University of Toronto. Twelve novellas by Vasyl Stefanyk were analyzed and, according to the author, "...simple methods of literary statistical measures were used to characterize Stefanyk's language and genre." The extent of the dissertation is not given and no order number is provided.

A955. "Meet our young writer." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (18 July 1972): 2].

The Digest's title: "Higher standards in publishing works of young authors urged." The anonymous author discusses what he considers to be shortcomings and faults in the work with young writers.

A956. "Meeting at the General Consulate of the PNR." / H.Z. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1968): 27-28. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 December 1968): 2].

On the occasion of the Decade of Polish Books, a meeting took place at the Polish Consulate in Kyiv: Ukrainian translators and experts in Polish literature met with Zenona Macu anka, editor in chief of the Polish journal Nasze ksi ki. Macu anka provided a survey of problems and trends in contemporary Polish literature and informed the Ukrainian audience that 60 Ukrainian writers have been translated into Polish "with a total publication of half a million copies." Speakers at the meeting included Stefan Stec, the Consul General, Ukrainian writers Vitalii Korotych, Mykola Bazhan, O. Poltorats'kyi, H. Shablity, manager of Ukrains'ka knyha, and O. Bandura, director of Dnipro Publishers. The title as supplied by the Digest: "Polish-Ukrainian literary exchanges reviewed."

A957. "A Meeting with writers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.7 (July 1968): 15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 June 1968): 1].

About a meeting of the leading members of the Writers' Union with the First Secretary of the Cental Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine, Petro Shelest. The unsigned article says that there was an"extraordinarily animated and sincere discussion" at the meeting, and that the "primary issue was the contention that the Union of Writers should play a major role in organizing and directing the literary process, and in ideologically tempering the writers." The Digest's supplied title reads: "Ideology pep-talk: party chief haddles with writers' leadership".

A958. Mehela, Yanko. "Lines like flashes of lightning. Ukrainian poetry in the Hungarian language." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Robitnycha hazeta (12 July 1972): 2].

A review of two recent books of Ukrainian literature published in Hungarian translations. One - a 1971 anthology of Ukrainian poetry published jointly by Mahveto Publishers of Budapest and Karpaty Publishers of Uzhhorod, Ukraine. The anthology, according to this review, includes "the works of 95 Ukrainian poets, as well as folk and historical songs" and is accompanied by a comprehensive article by Sara Karig. The other Hungarian publication reviewed is a collection of L. Ukrainka's 113 poems, issued by Europa Publishing House in 1971, with an afterword by Sara Karig. For the Lesia Ukrainka collection the title is translated into Ukrainian as "Shliakh do moria" or, in English, "The Road to the Sea". Hungarian titles for these two books are not given. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian literature in Hungarian translation."

A959. "Mel'nichuk, Yuriy Stepanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 380.

Bio-bibliographical data (18 lines) about Iurii Mel'nychuk, writer, journalist, literary historian (b.1921, d.11 August 1963).

A960. "Melnychuk, Taras Yuriyovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 68.

Fourteen lines about dissident activities and imprisonment of the poet Taras Mel'nychuk.

A961. Mel'nyk, Borys. "The Ukrainian bookstore on Arbat Street." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.1 (January 1976): 26-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Visti z Ukrainy. 47 (900) (November 1975): 7].

About "Ukrainska knyha", a book store on Arbat Street in Moscow, in existence for some 40 years. Mel'nyk reports on his interviews with some Moscowite customers interested in Ukrainian literature and Ukrainian books in general and says that there is a great demand for these books. "Last year 500,000 rubles worth of books were sold." The Digest's title: "Ukrainian bookstore thrives in Moscow."

A962. Meshko, Oksana. "Ivan Dzyuba: memoirs." Ukrainian Review (LOndon). 27 [sic, i.e.26].4 (Winter 1979):44-48.

A chapter from Oksana Meshko's memoirs in which she recalls her meeting with Ivan Dziuba on 16 May 1074, not long after Dziuba's release from prison and his recantation.

A963. "Michael Luchkovich." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.2 (Summer 1973): 221.

An obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events". Michael Luchkovich was a Member of the Canadian Parliament, the author of memoirs and a translator of Ukrainian literature. He was born in Shamokin, PA and died at 79 in April 1973 in Edmonton.

A964. "Michael Ostrowercha". Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 218.

A brief obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events" about Mykhailo Ostroverkha, writer and journalist who died in Brooklyn, N.Y. on 7 April, 1979 at the age of 82.

A965. Miiakovs'kyi, Volodymyr. "Pavlo Zaytsev (1886- 1965)" / W.M. Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 11.1-2 (31-32) (1964-1968): 273-275.

An obituary article about Pavlo Zaitsev, who was born 23 September 1886 in Slobids'ka Ukraine and died 2 September 1965 in Munich, Germany. According to the author, Zaitsev graduated in 1913 from the St. Petersburg University and was active as a scholar in Ukraine prior to 1918. He published articles on Shevchenko, edited literary publications of Tychyna and Zerov, was editor of Zapysky, a journal of the Historical-Philological Department of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. In 1920 he emigrated to the West. While he was professor at the University of Warsaw and as an associate of the Ukrainian Scientific Institute in Warsaw, he devoted his efforts to the publication of Shevchenko's works in 16 volumes. He wrote commentaries to individual volumes of this edition and prepared also a biography of Shevchenko. This biography was published separately in 1955. The author singles out two "interesting works" of Zaitsev: one - the book "Shevchenko and the Poles" (in Polish), the other - an article on Shevchenko's creative process ("Iak tvoryv Shevchenko"). After the war Zaitsev lived in Munich, taught at the Ukrainian Free University, published several memoirs about his contemporaries (Vynnychenko, Oles', Koshyts', O. Lotots'kyi).

A966. Mikhailenko, Olena. "Museum of the Great Kobzar." Forum. 20 (1972): 8-11. illus.

An illustrated article about the Shevchenko Museum in Kyiv established in 1949. The museum contains original literary and artistic works of Taras Shevchenko, as well as his personal library, some private articles and works about Shevchenko. "During his short life Shevchenko created more than 1,200 art works and more than 300 works of literature," says Mikhailenko and describes some of the museum's exhibits. Among the illustrations - a reproduction in black and white of Shevchenko's painting 'Kateryna" on p.10.

A967. "Mikhailo Stelmakh." Ukrainian Canadian. 24.542 (35) (December 1971): 41. port.

An unsigned note about Mykhailo Stel'makh to accompany a translation of one of his stories [cf. T395]. The note includes a quotation from M. Ryl's'kyi characterizing Stel'makh as a writer who "entered prose armed with poetry... Qualities that are characteristic of Stelmakh the poet, became an integral part of his prose. These characteristics are a love for the language, for full- bodied beautiful words, of sensitive, at times exquisite metaphors, a popular approach, a truly national originality and at the same time a human breadth of vision."

A968. "Mikhailo Stelmakh." Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 9. illus., port., part. col.

An unsigned profile of Mykhailo Stel'makh, with his b/w portrait and reproductions of the covers of his books published in Hungarian and in French. [Duma pro tebe; Husy-lebedi letiat']. Stel'makh, says this note, "treats a controvesial world of opposing values - beauty and cruelty, love and hatred, inducing his readers to side with his characters who love their farming trade and try to make this world a better place to live in."

A969. Mikhnovs'kyi, Mykola. "Shevchenko's anniversary." Ukrainian Review (London). 15.4 (Winter 1986): 71-75.

One chapter in "The writings of Mykola Mikhnovskyi" which is part of a longer series by Anatol W. Bedriy entitled "Mykola Mikhnovskyi - first theoretician of modern Ukrainian nationalism". Shevchenko's poetry, according to Mikhnovs'kyi, is a "constant spring of eternal love", "the greatest, the dearest, the most valuable treasure of the Ukrainian people." There are some brief quotations of Shevchenko's poetry, the longest of which is "Dusk is falling, dawn is breaking" (16 lines) in Vera Rich's translation (p.74).

A970. "Mikitenko, Ivan Kondrat'yevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 387.

Twenty-seven lines of bio-bibliographical data about the playwright Ivan Mykytenko (b. 6 September 1897, d. in prison 4 October 1937).

A971. "The militant tasks of communist writers. Report and election meetings in party organizations." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.12 (December 1975): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (4 November 1975): 1].

The Digest includes reports from Dnipropetrovsk (by A. Solonskyy), Zaporizhzhia (by Y. Chernenko), Kharkiv (by H. Stukalova) and Lviv (by M. Petrenko). Each one of them points out what the authors consider to be the major achievements and problems on the local level. No additional Digest title given.

A972. Minchuk, Borys. "This sick and crazy nationalism". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.1 (January 1974): 17-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vsesvit. 9 (September 1973): 206-212.

A reaction to articles on Soviet Russian and Soviet Ukrainian literatures published in the West by such writers as M. Slonim, J. Pelenski [Yaroslav Pelenskyy], R. Sullivant, O. Rubulis, I. Fizer. The Digest's title: "Attempts to undermine socialism from within laid to western literary critics."

A973. Minchyn, Borys. "The impotence of falsification." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.4 (April 1971): 7-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 March 1971): 4].

Western anti-Communist sovietologists, according to Minchyn, deny "the reality of the friendship of Soviet nations", "reject the existence of the international unity of the literatures of these peoples, and exclude the very possibility of the process of reciprocal exchange and reciprocal enrichment of artistic values between socialist nations." This polemical article attacks "the traitor Ivan Koszeliwec" [Koshelivets'], J. Pelenski [Yaroslav Pelenskyy] and Ivan Fizer for their anti-Russian, pro-Western and pro-modernistic views on Ukrainian literature. The Digest's title: "Distortion laid to western critics".

A974. "Minko, Vasiliy Petrovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 412.

A 48-line bio-bibliographical note about the writer and playwright Vasyl' Mynko (born 1902).

A975. "Mrs. Moroz's appeal in the Canadian press." ABN Correspondence. 27.4 (July-August 1976): 31-32.

On May 21st in a telephone conversation with The Star, the Toronto newspaper, Raisa Moroz pleaded for her husband, Valentyn Moroz. "Let him be put in a forced labor camp. But please do not let him be put in an insane asylum", pleaded the wife according to this news item. The article reports on the actions on behalf of Valentyn Moroz in the House of Commons in Ottawa, as well as on similar actions in Great Britain, USA, Germany, France, Switzerland and Australia.

A976. "Mogilyanskiy, M." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 393.

Bio-bibliographical data (15 lines) about the publicist and critic Mykhailo Mohylians'kyi. The date of birth is given as 1873, the date of death as unknown. In fact, Mohylians'kyi was born on 4 December 1873 and died on 22 March 1942.

A977. Molnar, Mykhaylo. "Ivan Kotlyarevs'kyy among the Czechs and Slovaks." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.11 (November 1969): 11- 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 September 1969): 4].

Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi, says the author, "was written about in Czechia while he was still alive." Molnar provides a survey of Kotliarevskyi studies and translations - from the first mention in a letter by A. Stoykovych from Kharkiv dated 6 March 1806 and published in German in the anthology Slavin (1860) and in Paul Josef Safaryk's history of the Slavic languages and literatures (1826) to a complete Czech translation of Eneida by Maria Marchanova (published in 1955) and a 1950 Slovak translation of Natalka Poltavka.

A 978. "A monument to Shevchenko on French soil." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.12 (December 1974): 27. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 October 1974): 4].

A report by a special correspondent of the TASS news agency from Chalette-sur-Loing (Loiret department) where a bust of Taras Shevchenko was unveiled "last Sunday". The bust, the work of the Ukrainian sculptor O. Skoblykov, was a gift from the Dnipro rayon of Kyiv. The USSR ambassador to France S.V. Chervonenko and Ukrainian writer Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi spoke at the ceremony. The Digest's title: "Unveil monument to Shevchenko in France."

A979. "Monument to Stefanyk... a tribute and a reminder." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.537 (58) (July/August 1971): 10-11. illus.

A photo report from the unveiling of a monument to Vasyl' Stefanyk "on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth and the 80th anniversary of Ukrainian immigration to Canada on May 22 by the Ukrainian Cultural Centre of the AUUC in Edmonton". There are eight photographs, including one of the monument to Stefanyk. Among the speakers participating in the festivities were Peter Prokop, Michael Torchenko and George Ryga. The "AUUC" refers to the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians.

A980. "Monuments to Shevchenko and Pushkin: symbols of heritage and kinship." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.529 (23) (November 1970): 13-15. illus.

About the unveiling of bronze portrait monuments of Taras Shevchenko and Aleksander Pushkin in Arrow Park, Monroe county, New York. Both monuments were the gift of the USSR. The bust of Shevchenko is by Vasyl Borodai, the one of Pushkin - by O. Kovaliov. The unveiling ceremonies took place on 6 September 1970 and were attended by some 4,000 people, according to this report which was reprinted from the Ukrainian-American.

A981. "More trials in the USSR." ABN Correspondence. 24.2 (March-April 1973): 1-2.

Originally a letter that was published in The Times of London on February 3, 1973. The letter was signed by a group of British intellectuals: Peggy Ashcroft, A.J. Ayer, Robert Birley, Denis Brogan, Stuart Hampshire, Frank Kermode, Yehudi Menuhin, J.B. Priestley, Baron Robbins, Richard Wollheim. The letter protests intensified persecution of writers and other intellectuals in Ukraine naming Osadchyi, I. Stasiv, Ihor Kalynets', Vasyl Stus, V. Moroz, Dziuba, Svitlychnyi, Chornovil and Sverstiuk as prominent examples.

A982. Morhaienko, Petro. "The same one..." Feuilleton / Petro Morhayenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 8-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 November 1968): 4].

An attack on Bohdan Kravtsiv, an emigré Ukrainian poet, journalist and literary scholar. Says Morhaienko: "Krawciw feverishly pores over Soviet Ukrainian newspapers and journals. He looks for anything which could help in spinning his web of falsification... Any Soviet critic who defends the interest of the Party, people, or socialist realism is branded a regimist... More than anything he would like to find in our society, and especially in our literature, an insurmountable generation gap... B. Krawciw means to achieve his own ends by posing as the defender of young, new talent... Krawciw's opuses are generously and systematically published in the filthy nationalist 'periodical' called Suchasnist..." Bohdan Kravtsiv is also labelled in this article: "Goebbels functionary" and "Petlura's ode writer and Hitler's parasite". The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Party hack reviles Krawciw and 'Suchasnist'".

A983. Moroz, Anatolii. "Four interviews" / Anatoliy Moroz. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.2 (February 1968): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 December 1967): 1].

A. Moroz, director of the Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house, in an interview with Vitalii Korotych discusses the new quarterly journal Poeziia, the first issue of which is to appear in January. Korotych is to be editor-in-chief of the new journal dedicated to poetry. The Digest supplied title reads: "Korotych heads new poetry quarterly." It is unclear what exactly the title in Literaturna Ukraina is referring to: there might have been three additional interviews which were not digested by the English language Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press.

A984. Moroz, Raisa. "Full text of Raisa Moroz's open letter." ABN Correspondence. 25.6 (November-December 1974): 43.

A letter on behalf of Valentyn Moroz, the imprisoned historian and writer, by his wife Raisa addressed to Western governments and international organizations. The letter is dated 5 November 1974.

A985. Moroz, Raisa. "I am anxiously waiting... Open letter to chairman of the KGB (Committee of State Security) at the Council of Ministers of the Ukrainian SSSR, comrade Fedorchuk." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.1 (Spring 1971): 13-14.

The letter on behalf of the imprisoned Valentyn Moroz by his wife reprinted from the underground journal Ukrainskyi visnyk (no.3, October 1970).

A986. Moroz, Valentyn. "Among the snows." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.1 (Spring 1971): 15-35.

A polemic essay, dated February 1970, about the character and tactics of self-defense of Ukrainians against Russification and other pressures exerted by the Soviet regime. It was "the mission of the 'poets of the sixties' to carry a spark of infatuation into the frozen Ukrainian reality," says Moroz and criticizes sharply the recantations published by Ivan Drach and Ivan Dziuba. The essay, according to the translator's note appended, "is circulating in manuscript form in Ukraine as one of the documents of clandestine literature."

A987. Moroz, Valentyn. "The first day." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.4 (Winter 1971): 75-76.

An essay on the first day in prison reprinted in translation from Ukrains'kyi visnyk (no.4, January 1971).

A988. Moroz, Valentyn. "The first day." ABN Correspondence. 25.5 (September-October 1974): 11-12.

A memoir of the first day in prison after his arrest on 1 June 1970.

A989. Moroz, Valentyn. "Instead of a last plea." Ukrainian Quarterly. 28.2 (Summer 1972): 126-130.

A plea submitted to the judges in written form at the beginning of Valentyn Moroz's second trial in 1970, at which he was sentenced to nine years of hard labor. With an editorial note. At the time of this article's publication Valentyn Moroz was a prisoner in the Vladimir prison in Moscow.

A990. Moroz, Valentyn. "Nine hours in the twilight zone." Ukrainian Review (London). 27 [sic, i.e. 26].3 (Autumn 1979): 22-35.

A memoir of Valentyn Moroz about his last hours in captivity and his journey from Mordovia, USSR to New York. The memoir was translated by Zena Matla-Rychtycka. About Moroz's release see also A1646.

A991. Moroz, Valentyn. "Report from the Beria reserve. The first day." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.4 (Winter 1974): 28-29.

Impressions of the first day in prison. See also A987, A988.

A992. "Moroz, Valentyn Yakovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 70-71. port.

One and one-half page about dissident activities and prison experiences of Valentyn Moroz, historian, publicist and poet, born 1936.

A993. "Moroz again on hunger strike." ABN Correspondence. 28.4 (July-August 1977): 43.

Valentyn Moroz is "one of ten Soviet political prisoners... who began a 100-day hunger strike late in April to draw the attention of the participants of the Belgrade review conference to the plight of human, national and religious rights activists behind the Iron Curtain," says this news item.

A994. "Moroz moved to Serbsky Institute." ABN Correspondence. 27.3 (May-June 1976): 47.

According to this news item, Raisa Moroz told western correspondents that officials of the Interior Ministry's Medical Service informed her on May 18 that her husband had been transferred to Moscow's Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry.

A995. "Moroz transferred to Mordovia." ABN Correspondence. 27.6 (November-December 1976): 10.

According to this news item, Valentyn Moroz was transferred from Vladimir prison to Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry on 10 May 1976. After two month he was declared sane and moved to Moscow's Butyrka prison and then to Mordovian camp No.1 near Barashevo.

A996. "Moroz transferred to psychiatric ward." ABN Correspondence. 26.3/4 (May-August 1975): 64. port.

A news item which claims that Valentyn Moroz was transferred from his cell in the Vladimir prison to a psychiatric ward, "one of the most dreaded forms of punishment in the Soviet penal system." With Valentyn Moroz's photo.

A997. Moser, Charles A. "The problem of the Igor Tale." Canadian-American Slavic Studies. 7.2 (Summer 1973): 135-154.

"Despite the reams of scholarly prose produced on the subject of the Slovo, the current state of knowledge about this poem permits no final settlement of the problem of its authenticity..." says Moser about Slovo o polku Ihorevim. He attempts to summarize the case against the authenticity of Slovo and to propose a hypothesis as to who the 18th century forger of the poem might be.

Moser provides a survey of the sceptics, such as the Metropolitan Evgenii Bolkhovitinov, Osip Senkovskii, Louis Léger, André Mazon, Henryk Paszkiewicz, Juljan Krzyzanowski, as well as those who defended Slovo's authenticity and attempted to refute the sceptics' arguments, such scholars as Evgenii Liatskii, N.K. Gudzii, Roman Jakobson, George Vernadsky, Dmitrij Čiževskij. The author also relates the story of a Soviet scholar A.A. Zimin, whose book favoring Mazon's thesis was not permitted to be published in the USSR. In addition to linguistic doubts, Moser raises such issues as the great popularity and revival of medieval documents which led to such mystifications as those by James Macpherson and Vaclav Hanka, the curious fact that Slovo "stands head and shoulders above all other literary productions of its time" and that only a single copy of it survived. According to Moser, the manuscript of the Slovo "came to light in 1795"; five years elapsed between the Slovo's discovery and the publication of the first edition by A.L. Musin-Pushkin, A.F. Malinovskii and N.N. Bantysh-Kamenskii in 1800. The destruction of the manuscript took place in 1812. "...during the entire period from 1800 to 1812, when the manuscript was theoretically still in existence," says Moser, "nobody saw it, even though many were aware of the Slovo's importance and should have been curious about the original, particularly in view of the unsatisfactory text reproduced in the first edition of 1800." Moser is suspicious of the fact that Slovo is claimed to have been composed in 1187 - while other works of the period are difficult to date, as well as of Slovo's heavy use of folklore motifs and the relative absence of Christian ideology. Says Moser: "This emphasis would probably be more congenial to the eighteenth century Ossianic spirit than to the twelfth century Kievan mentality..." Being a serious sceptic of the Slovo's authenticity, Moser asks himself the question: "Who could possibly have been capable of producing such excellent mystification at the end of the eighteenth century..." A previous sceptic, Mazon, suspected first the archivist Bantysh-Kamenskii, then Ioil Bykovskii (1726-1798). Moser's own candidate is Nikolai Aleksandrovich L'vov (1751-2 December 1803), possibly aided by Ivan Nikitich Boltin (1735-1792). In advocating his hypothesis, Moser analyzes the details of circumstances of Slovo's discovery and the available data on both Boltin and L'vov.

A998. "The most complete humanist (Taken from secondary sources)." / B.H. Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 27.7-8 (315-316) (July-August 1976): 27. port.

A brief note about Ivan Franko singling out as his special achievement the poetry collection Ziviale lystia and the long poems Ivan Vyshens'kyi and Moisei.

A999. "Muratov, Igor Leontevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 424.

Bio-bibliographical data (39 lines) about the poet, prose writer and playwright Ihor Muratov (born 1912).

A1000. Muratov, Ihor. "Gratitude of posterity". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 November 1968): 2].

A note about Hryhorii Kvitka-Osnovianenko. The author contemplates the portrait of Kvitka - a member of the nobility, the son of a landowner, an aulic councillor and court administrator - in a 1822 album of Kharkiv's marshals of nobility and city fathers - and a collection of Kvitka's stories published as part of the Shkilna biblioteka in 1968 - stories that were destined to bring him "a different kind of glory". The Digest's title: "Muratov on Kvitka-Osnovyanenko".

A1001. Muratov, Ihor. "The Muse in the service of the KVV." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 16-17. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 January 1972): 3].

About a "Tournament of Poets" organized by the republican television studio in which young poets from Odessa oblast participated. The Digest's title: "Extemporaneous poetry contest ridiculed."

A1002. Muratov, Ihor. "Not out of the sea foam. Reflection on the Writers' Congresses." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.8 (August 1967): 19-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 July 1967): 1-3].

Reflections on tradition and innovation in poetry and a critical discussion of three poets: Roman Lubkivs'kyi (Hromove derevo), Volodymyr Mordan' (Lystopad) and Vasyl Fol'varochnyi (Rostut' syny; Tryvoha). The Digest's supplied title reads: "Muratov sees continuity through generations of poets."

A1003. Mushketyk, Iurii. "An author's comment." / Yuri Mushketik. Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 11. col.illus, b/w port.

Mushketyk discusses his recent books, especially Sud nad Senekoiu (The trial of Seneca) in which "The passionate, irrespressible and uncompromising young 'judges' seek eternal truths in the wisdoms and events of long ago, without realizing that in their everyday life, in work, love and friendship they find real, substantial truths of today." The article is illustrated with the book's cover in color and a b/w portrait of Mushketyk.

A1004. Mushketyk, Iurii. "Poet of peace." / Yuri Mushketik. Ukraine. 4(36) (1978): 25. port.

About Oleksandr Pidsukha, with his b/w portrait. Pidsukha, according to Mushketyk, "seems to stand at a crucial dividing point between light and darkness; with a song of creation on one side, and the clashing of swords on the other." The Kyiv publishing house "Dnipro" was about to publish a collection of Pidsukha's poetry in English translations.

A1005. "Mykhailo Kotsiubynsky (To commemorate the 60 anniversary of his death)." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 24.7-8 (283-284) (July- August 1973): 23.

An obvious reprint from some unidentified source, this unsigned article considers Fata Morgana Kotsiubyns'kyi's greatest work and speaks of Kotsiubyns'kyi's "fine impressionistic resources" which helped him unfold "the spiritual world of man in the 'extreme situations' of terror, hatred, the urge to kill, and escape from one's fellow beings to nature" and of Kotsiubyns'kyi's "search for a healthy, whole man, close to the harmony of nature" in his Tini zabutykh predkiv.

A1006. "Mykola Ponedilok." Ukrainian Quarterly. 32.2 (Summer 1976): 219.

An obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events." Mykola Ponedilok, born in 1922 in Ukraine, died in New York on 25 January 1976 at the age of 54.

A1007. "Mykola Ponedilok." Ukrainian Quarterly. 32.4 (Winter 1976): 441-442.

See A1006. Text identical.

A1008. "Mykola Ponedilok, noted writer and humorist, dies." Ukrainian Review (London). 21 [sic,i.e.22].4 (Winter 1975): 92-93.

A brief unsigned obituary of the popular émigré writer who died in New York on January 25, 1976 at the age of 54.

A1009. "Mykola Rudenko". Smoloskyp. 1.2 (Winter 1979): 12. port.

A brief unsigned article about the persecution in the USSR of the Ukrainian dissident writer Mykola Rudenko, with his portrait.

A1010. Mykula, W. "Soviet nationalities policy in Ukraine, 1920-1930." Ukrainian Review (London). 19.4 (Winter 1972): 71-77; 20.1 (Spring 1973): 44-48.

In chapters 4 and 5 of a longer work published serially in several issues of the Ukrainian Review considerable attention is paid to literature and literary politics of the 1920's in Soviet Ukraine. Chapter 4 is entitled: "The Ukrainian cultural renaissance", chapter 5 - "The literary discussion and the origins of Khvylovyi's deviation."

A1011. "Mykyta Mandryka". Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.3 (Autumn 1979): 330-331.

An obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the poet and scholar who was born in Kyiv on 28 September 1886 and died in Winnipeg on 20 August 1979 at the age of 92.

A1012. Mykytan, Ol. "In the role of preacher. A reply." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.6 (June 1972): 15-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 April 1972): 3].

About a lecture given by Oles' Berdnyk to students of the Kyiv Polytechnical Institute of Food Industry. Mykytan accuses Berdnyk of filling his preachings "with Biblical, Buddhist and Yogic dogmas, as well as the maxims of various charlatans. "The writer tried to persuade the young audience that pleasure and love is the ultimate form of happiness attainable by man," says Mykytan and poses a question: "Who allows and gives his blessing to these public appearances by O. Berdnyk, whose science fiction works have incurred conclusive and irrefutable criticism as anti-literary, anti-scientific, as well as such that are permeated with mysticism and clericalism?" The Digest's title: "Science fiction writer taken to task for 'mysticism' and 'clericalism'."

A1013. Mykytas', Vasyl'. "Against bourgeois-nationalist falsifications of the international significance of Soviet Ukrainian literature." / V.L. Mykytas'. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.4 (April 1976): 21-25. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Ukrains'ka mova i literatura v shkoli. 9 (September 1975): 12-24].

Says Mykytas' of "Ukrainian bourgeois-nationalists" outside Ukraine: "these fascist traitors hired themselves out to internationalist imperialism as paid agents of ideological sabotage. Having created 'in exile' or in 'diaspora' at the expense of moneyed bigwigs a ramified network of various anti-people societies, organizations, nationalist parties and factions, journals and newspapers, the nationalist troubadours use their press to conduct unremitting anti-Soviet propaganda, resorting to both crude and disguised falsification of the ideo-esthetic principles of Soviet literature in order to belittle its great international significance in the cultural treasure- house of the world..." While a number of emigré Ukrainian critics are mentioned by name, the focus of Mykytas' article is on Ivan Koshelivets' [Koszeliwec, in text] who published an article about the Third Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine [in the emigré journal Suchasnist', 7-8 (1971)]. Mykytas' attempts to refute Koshelivets's assertion, "that the plenum was not called for the sake of literature, that literature was discussed only as a means of struggle for peace and friendship" (which in Koshelivets's view, according to Mykytas', spells "the death of literature") and that Ukrainian literature is largely unknown outside of Ukraine, except in countries of the socialist bloc where translations appeared 'only on orders' of Moscow. Digest's title: "Party hack attacks Western literary critics".

A1014. Mykytas', Vasyl'. "Let us discuss this in a business- like manner." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.2 (February 1975): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 December 1974): 3].

"... criticism of literary criticism has been a key item on the agenda of the literary and art community", says Mykytas'. In his opinion, more incentives and more training are needed to encourage literary critics, otherwise they will continue to move "to the more peaceful professions of literary historian or instructor"... "Critics are becoming literary scholars, docents and professors and their planned works and teaching loads leave them no time to indulge in active critical activity", says Mykytas'. The Digest's title: "A program for training of literary critics outlined".

A1015. Mynko, Vasyl'. "7th Congress of Ukraine's Writers. Report of the Auditing Commission of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. Speech of Vasyl' Mynko." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 21-22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 6].

The following data are given in this report for the period under review: the Union of Writers of Ukraine numbers 922 members; the Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house published 632 works (of these: 309 - prose, 250 - poetry, 70 - collections of literary and critical materials, 3 - dramatic works - these numbers not including children's literature); 20 members of the Union received new apartments; ten-day festivals ("dekadas") of fraternal literatures were held in Ukraine and Ukrainian writers attended such festivals in other Soviet republics.

A1016. Myrnyi, Panas. "The mother tongue". An article by Panas Mirny. Tr. by Mary Skrypnyk. Ukrainian Canadian. 25.559 (52) (June 1973): 40- 41. port.

Says Myrnyi: "The greatest and dearest possession of every people is their mother tongue - that living reservoir of the human spirit, that rich treasure into which a people store their past, reflect their aspirations, their learning, experience and perceptions."

A1017. "Myrnyy, Panas (real name: Rudchenko, Afanasiy Yakovlevich)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 402.

Twenty-five lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Panas Myrnyi (b. 1 May 1849, d.1920).

A1018. "Mysterious death of Ukrainian composer in Lviv." ABN Correspondence. 30.5 (September-October 1979): 39.

An unsigned article about the death and funeral of Volodymyr Ivasiuk. Ivasiuk, a composer and poet, was 30 years old at the time of his death on May 18, 1979.

A1019. Nahayewsky, Isidore . "Ukrainian literature." In his History of Ukraine. 2d, enl. and supplemented ed. Philadelphia: America, 1975. 25-29.

This subchapter in a general history book provides a brief overview of the history of Ukrainian literature. Portraits of Ukrainian writers appear as illustrations throughout the book: Shashkevych (p.235), Shevchenko (p.237), Franko (p.239), Shevchenko's monument in Winnipeg (p.305), Lesia Ukrainka's monument in Cleveland (p.307), Shevchenko's monument in Washington (p.315), Shevchenko's monument in Buenos Aires, Argentina (p.321). On p.298 the 1949 text of the anthem of Soviet Ukraine is printed in an unattributed translation: "Live, O Ukraine, beautiful and strong" (16 lines). There is no mention of the author (or authors) of the poem.

A1020. Nahaylo, Bohdan. "Profile: Ivan Svitlychny." Index on Censorship. 7.2 (March-April 1978): 42-45. Port. Biblio.

A silhouette of Ivan Svitlychnyi, a literary scholar and critic, currently a political prisoner in the USSR, according to Nahaylo "halfway through a sentence totalling twelve years". "From the very outset," says Nahaylo, Svitlychnyi's "approach to literary criticism was characterised by his insistence on a high aesthetic level in literature, and by an abhorrence of the vulgar stereotypes and banalities which deformed contemporary Ukrainian writing." In the mid-1960's, according to Nahaylo, intellectuals in Ukraine, hitherto concerned primarily with aesthetic and cultural problems, began to show a greater interest in social and political questions. Ivan Svitlychnyi was one of the leaders of the Ukrainian human and national rights movement. He was arrested first in 1965 and though released, he was deprived of employment and subjected to persistent harassment from the KGB, says Nahaylo. In January 1972 he was arrested again and after a trial in March 1973 was sentenced for "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda" to seven years of strict regime labor camp and five years of exile. Says Nahaylo: "In the camps he is reported to be as much a source of inspiration and courage to those around him, as he was in Kiev before his arrest." B/w portrait of Ivan Svitlychnyi appears on p.43; a selected bibliograophy of his works on p. 44.

A1021. Nahaylo, Bohdan. "Seven years later..." Index on Censorship. 8.1 (January-February 1979): 37.

Ivan Svitlychnyi, Viacheslav Chornovil, Ievhen Sverstiuk, Vasyl' Stus, Ihor Kalynets' and Mykhailo Osadchyi, punished with long terms in labor camps and internal exile "for heading the revival of the Ukraine's literary and public life during the sixties", have all completed the first part of their sentences, according to Nahaylo, and have been sent into exile in remote regions of the USSR. Nahaylo reports on what is known about the conditions of life in exile of these six dissident Ukrainian writers.

A1022. Naïdko, I. "Shevchenko in Slovakia (1861-1917)." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.2 (Summer 1970): 68-75.

A bibliographical essay surveying the Slovak publications on Taras Shevchenko - from the first article by Gustav Lojko published in Pestbudinske Vedomosti on 20 March 1866 through 1911 when several articles on Shevchenko appeared in the Slovak press. Naïdko's essay is a translation of the work which appeared originally in Slovenska literatura, 11.1 (1962): 101-116.

A1023. "Name Shevchenko Place in New York City." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.2 (Summer 1978): 208.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events": The New York City Council's Committee on Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs voted on 5 April 1978 to rename Hall Place "Taras Shevchenko Place". The bill was signed into law by Mayor Edward I. Koch on 4 May 1978. The Shevchenko Place is located between Sixth and Seventh streets near Third Avenue.

A1024. "Narodna tvorchist' ta etnohrafia". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 339.

A note about a journal of this title that deals with Ukrainian folk arts and has been published since 1925. (18 lines).

A1025. "Natalia Kobrynska." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's world. 25.11/12 (298) (November/December 1974): 34. port.

An unsigned biographical note about Natalia Kobryns'ka (1851-1920), characterized here as "a talented writer" and the "initiator of the Ukrainian women's movement."

A1026. "Nationalities. Russian translation of D. Pavlychko's reply to a Ukrainian émigré..." Soviet Studies. Information Supplement. 24 (October 1969): 17.

A digest of 8 lines of a polemical letter published originally in Literaturna Ukraina (1 August 1969) [cf. A1135] and republished in a Russian translation in Literaturnaia gazeta (33/69, p.4).

A1027. Nazarevs'kyi, M. "Some facts and figures on translation in Ukraine." / M. Nazarevs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.1 (January 1970): 11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Movoznavstvo. 5 (September- October 1969): 46-47].

About the recently published translations of Homer, Bocaccio, Roman and French poets, Shakespeare, as well as some books on the theory and practice of translation. Digest's title: Literary translations in Ukraine.

A1028. Nedwell, Paul. "Marko Vovchok." Forum. 25 (1974): 24-25. port.

A biographical sketch of Maria Markovych (1834-1907) who wrote under the name of Marko Vovchok, with her portrait. The article is about the life of the writer with no listing, commentary or analysis of her works.

A1029. Nedwell, Paul. "Ukrainian national anthem." Forum. 39 (Spring/Summer 1978): 25-30. illus., port.

The text of the Ukrainian national anthem "Shche ne vmerla Ukraina" was written by Pavlo Chubynskyi (1839-1884), the music for the anthem was composed by Mykhailo Verbyts'kyi (1815-1870). The text with Verbyts'kyi's music, according to this article, was first published in 1865 in Lviv. Nedwell's focus is on the composer Verbyts'kyi; there is, however, a bio- bibliographical paragraph on Chubyn'skyi [on p.29], his portraits on p.25 and p.30, as well as a reproduction of two pages containing an English translation of "Shche ne vmerla Ukraina" [Ukrainian national anthem (She lives on, our Ukraina] from the book Songs of Ukraina with Ruthenian Poems by Florence Randal Livesay (1916) [cf. ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B35 ].

A1030. "The need for harmony". Soviet Literature. 4 (313) (1974): 136-142.

"Writers' forum" in this issue of the journal is devoted to the "problem of protecting the environment" and provides a discussion of this topic by the Kirghis author Chinghiz Aitmatov and the Ukrainian literary critic Leonid Novychenko. The writers speak of links with nature of art and literature. Says Novychenko: "Literature... is helping in the development of a new attitude to the world of nature, an attitude not only genuinely prudent, but beneficial and full of intelligent concern for social wealth which must not only be preserved, but also multiplied."

A1031. "Nekhoda, Ivan Ivanovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 408.

Bio-bibliographical data (12 lines) about the poet Ivan Nekhoda (b. 11 June 1910, d.17 October 1963).

A1032. "Nestor". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 17 (1978): 476.

Fourteen lines about the "historian and writer of ancient Rus'", whose dates of birth and dates are unknown.

A1033. Neuhauser, Rudolf. "Changing attitudes in Soviet- Russian studies of Kievan asnd Old Russian literature." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 8 (1966): 182-197.

A critical survey of Soviet literary scholarship in the late 1950's and early 1960's in the field of Kyivan Rus' literature and in, what the author calls, "Old Russian literature". The main focus is on genres, stylistics and poetics of the old literature and on the work of such scholars as I.P. Eremin, N.K. Gudzii [Gudzij], V.E. Gusev, D.S. Likhachov [Lixačev], O.V. Tvorogov, S.Azbelev, V.P. Adrianova-Perets [Adrianova-Peretc]. In Neuhauser's view, "...the divergence of Soviet and Western views on the philosophical plane should not obscure the fact that, due to the change of attitude in the fifties, Soviet scholars have approached very closely our own standards... and have produced much valuable research that cannot be disregarded by Western scholars..."

A1034. Nevrly, Mikulas. "The voice of a Ukrainian Rabelais: On the 200th anniversary of Kotlyarevsky's birth." Forum. 10 (Fall 1969): 10- 11. illus.

This tribute to Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi by the Slovak scholar was originally published in the Slovak newspaper Pravda (Bratislava) on 2 September 1969. It was translated for Forum by Anna M. Procyk. According to Nevrly, "The gist of the Ukrainian Eneida lies in the fact that antiquity here is Ukrainianized with a truly consummate skill. Into the veins of the Trojan heroes the poet infused the passionate blood of his countrymen, dressed them in colorful Cossack costumes and in the personages of the ancient gods he depicted the decrepit Tsarist hierarchy which was able to sustain itself only through treachery and brutality." "The shortcomings and defects of his era Kotlyarevsky depicts in a satirical manner. In this he resembles the renaissance French writer, Rabelais. Humor and laughter overshadow completely the solemn tone of Virgil's classic of the same name," says Nevrly. Illustrations include a portrait of Kotliarevs'kyi.

A1035. "New trials of Ukrainian intellectuals." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.2 (Summer 1973): 224.

According to this news item in the "Chronicle of current events", Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ievhen Sversiuk were tried in April 1973 and sentenced to seven and five years at hard labor, respectively, under Article 62 of the Ukrainian Penal Code on charges of anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda.

A1036. "New wave of terror in Ukraine: Ukrainian intellectuals arrested in Ukraine." Ukrainian Review (London). 19.2 (Summer 1972): 92- 96.

A list of 30 intellectuals arrested by the KGB in January 1972. The list includes a number of writers and literary scholars, among them Viacheslav Chornovil, Ivan Dziuba [Dzyuba], Ivan Svitlychnyi, Ievhen Sverstiuk, Leonid Pliushch [Plyushch], Mykhailo Osadchyi [Osadchyy], Iryna Stasiv, Hryhorii Chubai [Hryhoriy Chubay], Vasyl' Stus. Brief biographical data are provided.

A1037. Nimenko, A. "Beautiful Lesya monuments on pedestals of love. In memory of Halyna Kalchenko." Ukrainian Canadian. 28.590 (83) (June 1976): 7-9. illus.

About the sculptor Halyna Kalchenko who died in March 1975. There is an additional unsigned note about Kalchenko on p.6. Illustrations include three monuments to Lesia Ukrainka (plus one on cover of the issue) and one monument to Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi.

A1038. Niniows'kyj, Vasyl. "Antonych's mysterious persten' and number three." Munich; Edmonton: Ukrainisches Technisch- Wirtschaftliches Institut, 1977. 17-24.

Apparently an offprint of an unattributed journal publication.

The author attempts to supplement Oleh Ilnytzkyi's article on Antonych and the symbolic meaning of persten in Antonych's poetry [cf. A509]. In his view, in addition to the mysterious and enigmatic try (three), Antonych also makes use of the numbers 11, 13, and 17 in various configurations. As to the symbolic meaning of persten, the author calls attention to its association with the word pr'st' (finger) and to a translation by Franko (from the German of G. E. Lessing) of a parable which he called in Ukrainian Prytcha pro try persteni.

A1039. "A note on Oles Honchar." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 1.1 (Fall 1976): 45-47.

An unsigned critical note about Oles' Honchar to accompany the publication of two chapters of his novel Sobor in Marta Olynyk's translation [cf. T107]. The note characterizes Honchar as a writer who has been "generally judged on political criteria", but whose position "vis-a-vis the timid and obscurantist literary establishment has not been without its ambiguities..."

A1040. Novats'kyi, M. "This must not be forgotten." / M. Novats'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.8 (August 1974): 29. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kul'tura i zhyttia. (26 May 1974): 2].

About a readers' conference in connection with the publication of Tavrovani zradoiu, a book of articles against the so called "Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists". "... the discussion of the book could scarcely remain contained within the framework of a conference," writes Novats'kyi, "quite understandably, it assumed the form of a trial over Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists..." The Digest's title reads: "Lviv writers attend discussion of new book on 'Ukrainian nationalists'."

A1041. "Novichenko, Leonid Nikolaevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 444.

A bio-bibliographical note of 47 lines about the literary critic and scholar Leonid Novychenko, born 1914.

A1042. Novikova, Marina. "The Soviet Ukraine: Dialogue with the world". Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (May 1973): 180-191.

Novikova, a correspondent of Soviet Literature, met and interviewed Oleh Mykytenko [Oleg Mikitenko in text], Vitalii Korotych [Korotich], Oles Honchar [Gonchar in text], Alexander Bandura (director of Dnipro Publishers), Roman Fedoriv. Topics under discussion were: international connections of Soviet Ukrainian literature, Vsesvit, the Ukrainian journal of translations from foreign literatures, masterpieces of foreign literature issued by Dnipro Publishers, translations of Ukrainian literature into foreign languages.

A1043. Novikova, Marina. "From Soviet Ukraine - a dialogue with the world." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.563 (56) (November 1973): 24-30. illus., port.

Apparently, a reprint from Soviet Literature's special issue devoted to Ukrainian literature [cf. A1042]. The article is illustrated with two b/w portraits of noted Ukrainian translators Hryhorii Kochur and Borys Ten (on p.29), as well as a group photo of Honchar signing autographs.

A1044. Novikova, Marina. "Keats in Ukrainian." Tr. by Monica Whyte. Soviet Literature. 6(291) (1972): 166-179.

Novikova provides a critical comparison of two Ukrainian editions of the 19th century English poet John Keats. The two editions are Vasyl Mysyk's translations published in Kyiv in 1968 and a volume of 14 Keats's poems translated into Ukrainian by Yar Slavutych and published in London in 1958. Novikova takes issue both with the translated texts and with the interpretation of Keats's poetry by the translators, particularly by Yar Slavutych.

A1045. Novychenko, Leonid. "Address". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.5 (May 1973): 15-16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (27 March 1973): 2].

Novychenko spoke at the 4th Plenum of Ukrainian Writers' Union in Kyiv. He expressed "bitterness and anxiety" about what he calls lack of "responsibility and high principles in criticism". According to Novychenko, works with "pernicious ideological errors and blunders" (such as Bilyk's Mech Areia, Andriashyk's Poltva or Berdnyk's Zorianyi korsar) "either received no response whatsoever from our professional literary critics", or were even "overtly supported and much praised". There were also "some regrettable errors and distortions in the process of rehabilitating a certain portion of our literary heritage from the 20's and 30's," says Novychenko. "In some cases deviations from the principles of partymindedness resulted in idealization of personages alien to Soviet literature; in others, it led to a "glossing over" of controversial figures whose legacy requires an especially vigilant, analytical approach." As an example of such errors, Novychenko points out to the assessment of M. Zerov by H. Kochur. The Digest's title: "Novychenko decries errors in rehabilitation of 1920's, 1930's authors."

A1046. Novychenko, Leonid. "Address to the Combined Jubilee Plenum of the Creative Unions and Organizations of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.5 (May 1970): 13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Kultura i zhyttia. (12 April 1970): 6].

Novychenko speaks of "Leninist principles of party spirit (partiynist') and national character (narodnist') which are the heart and soul of Soviet literature and art". He warns about the attempts of ideological enemies who attempt "to create discord among generations" and cites, as an example, the émigré publication Shistdesiat' poetiv shistdesiatykh rokiv. Digest's title: "Emigré publication of Soviet Ukrainian poetry assailed."

A1047. Novychenko, Leonid. "Concerning the advantage of questionnaires and censuses..." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.12 (December 1971): 17-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 October 1971): 3].

A response to Fashchenko's article [see A328]. Novychenko warns against the dangers of "simplification and superficiality" in the analysis of the "sociological census of literary population". The Digest's title: "... and Novychenko agrees."

A1048. Novychenko, Leonid. "The creative experience of criticism." / Report by Leonid Novichenko. Tr. by Yuri Sdobnikov. Soviet Literature. 10 (1967): 164-179. port.

A report presented at the 4th Congress of Writers of the USSR in Moscow. "The theoretical principles of Soviet literature were shaped through the organic fusion of the ideas of scientific socialism with the vibrant experience of revolutionary art..." says Novychenko. The main thing that determined the character of Soviet literature, according to the author, was "its indissoluble spiritual bonds with the people and the Party, and the ideas of communism..." Novychenko speaks of "multinational Soviet literature" "whose aesthetic features are determined by the concept of socialist realism", but he also calls attention to the fact that the process of its development "was not entirely free of vexatious 'zigzags' in thinking and writing, or of contradictions and wastages". Nowhere is there any indication that Novychenko is a Ukrainian literary scholar. With his b/w portrait.

A1049. Novychenko, Leonid. "Criticism and the literary process on the eve of Lenin's jubilee." Address by Leonid Novychenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.3 (March 1969): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (14 February 1969): 1-3].

Leonid Novychenko spoke on 13 February 1969 at the Third Plenum of the Union of Writers of Ukraine, in the Palace of Culture in Kyiv. "Unity of cognition and action, organic unity of veracity and high ideology - this character trait of socialist art is presently under attack by all manner of revisionists from both the right and the left", says Novychenko. He speaks critically of Czechoslovakia where "some critics and writers began violently discrediting the ideological educational obligation of literature in socialist society" and of China, where "Maoists began to devastate all literature which had become dangerous to them..." Novychenko criticised also domestic "editorial and publishing practices" where works of art are compared "against regulations for schematic 'correctness'..." Novychenko considers "decidedly incorrect" the "philosophic and esthetic base" of I. Dziuba's reflections revealed in his article on Svidzins'kyi [cf. A305], and praises A. Markov and O. Nykanorova for their critical assessment of recent books by I. Drach and M. Vinhranovs'kyi. The Digest supplied title reads: "Novychenko berates 'progressive' western critics."

A1050. Novychenko, Leonid. "Criticism: trials and tribulations." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 20-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (18 October 1968): 2].

Novychenko bemoans the "tendency to 'de-politicize' criticism, weaken its ties with ideological conflict and Communist training among the masses, and depart form our very precise social criteria for characterizing and appraising literary phenomena." Thus, in his view, controversial or unusual works are ignored by critics. In this connection he mentions Pervomais'kyi's book Uroky poezii, Smolych's memoirs published in the journal Druzhba narodov, and especially the younger writers - the "unquestionably talented" but "not yet altogether mature" Volodymyr Drozd, and Dmytro Pavlychko, whose poem "Molytva" from his recent book Hranoslov is analyzed critically in some detail. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Novychenko opens discussion on duties of critics." [See also A1375].

A1051. Novychenko, Leonid. "Develop more boldly the theory of socialist realism." / Leonid Novichenko. Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 12 (1966): 141-144.

An article which appeared originally in the journal Voprosy literatury. Some "urgent creative problems" in the theory of socialist realism, claims Novychenko have been "insufficiently developed" and "require considerably more profound deliberation and decisions, free from any onesidedness..." Among the problems he mentions "the question of the contemporary hero" and "the aesthetic programme of socialist realism". According to Novychenko: "...the synthetic character of socialist realism is revealed with greater clarity as a method inheriting the best there has been in world literature, encompassing all that is advanced and vital in past epochs and in modern times. We should struggle against omnivorosity, but on the basis of a truly mature, truly modern aesthetic theory." Even though Novychenko admonishes that "one must not forget the problem of the national form of the literatures of the peoples of the Soviet Union and, in particular, of the national languages", there is no indication anywhere that Novychenko is a Ukrainian critic.

A1052. Novychenko, Leonid. "The good health of brotherhood." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 20-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (10 August 1976): 2].

About Tychyna's poem "Chuttia iedynoi rodyny" completed, according to Novychenko, on 22 July 1936. "The sense of a single family - that is the image in which Pavlo Tychyna captured the great feeling of international unity, friendship and fraternity, which in our country has united individuals of all nations and nationalities into a new historical community - the Soviet people...", writes Novychenko. The Digest's title: "Novychenko on Tychyna's internationalism".

A1053. Novychenko, Leonid. "Materializing thought and embodying the world... (The 70th anniversary of Mikola Bazhan's birth)." / Leonid Novichenko. Soviet Literature. 11 (320) (1974): 148-152. port.

Novychenko discusses Bazhan's work as a poet and translator, and says about Bazhan: "...emotion charged three-dimensional imagery not only reflects his artistic inclination but a conscious aesthetic principle." In Bazhan's recent work, according to Novychenko, "he has boldly re-introduced several of the poetic principles and methods of his youth, although, of course, in a qualitatively new form: his use of parable and the symbolic significance of certain themes, emotion-charged metaphor, pictorial and musical power of the word." Bazhan's b/w portrait appears on p. 150.

A1054. Novychenko, Leonid. "New horizons of criticism." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.3 (March 1972): 12-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (4 February 1972): 1-2].

The Digests title: "Novychenko and Dmyterko score complimentary criticism at USSR Writers Union Plenum." Novychenko spoke at the plenum of the Executive Board of the USSR Writers Union held in Moscow at the end of January. He attacked, what he called, the "creeping esthetism" or "semi-esthetism", as well as "complimentary criticism" in the critical approaches to contemporary Ukrainin poetry. "... one-sided, flattering criticism, which often masks an insulting indifference towards the real values of art, and at times even openly partisan and group sentiments, does great harm to our efforts to educate both ourselves and our colleagues, as well as the general reader," says Novychenko. He gave examples of such reviews and appraisals published recently in Zhovten', Donbas, and even in the 8-volume history of Ukrainian literature. Novychenko also stressed the need for "a firm and aggressive struggle against enemy ideology", citing, what he called, "insidious myths and falsifications" by Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists in such émigré publications as Suchasnist' and Vyzvol'nyi shliakh. The Digest's title refers to a separate article by Dmyterko [cf. A233].

A1055. Novychenko, Leonid. "Novychenko rebuts recent Soviet language theories." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.1 (January 1967): 13- 15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (25 November 1966): 1-2].

Title supplied by the Digest. In a speech to the Fifth Congress of Writers Novychenko takes issue with statements of A.Agayev, K. Zelinskyy and others made recently in the Soviet Russian press. "What Agayev demanded in his articles", says Novychenko, "was that national languages be liquidated and all writers change to Russian." Zelinskyy, says Novychenko, gave as an example the Kirghiz writer Ch. Aytmatov "who began writing in the Kirghiz language, and later switched to Russian" and concluded that "In order to reach a wider audience, a writer must abandon his native language". Novychenko points out that Aytmatov "won world recognition precisely at the time when his works were being published with a note 'Translated from the Kirghiz'" and that it is the medium of translation which "shows the way to overcoming all barriers between nations and languages."

A1056. Novychenko, Leonid. "Oh, this novelism..." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.11 (November 1970): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 October 1970): 2].

Novychenko takes issue with an article by V. Ivanyshyn "Dialectics of genre" published in No.8 of Zhovten'. The epic tradition of the 'great socio-historical epic novel with which a number of famous achievements in the literature of socialist-realism are connected", says Novychenko, "is not to the liking of some modern exponents of arty views. They are drawn by the outpouring of artistic subjectivity, the concentration of the tale on a closer inner world of the autonomous 'self', the more direct 'self-expression' of the author not only in lyrical works, but also in prose. Under no circumstances can one consider this trend as productive and useful", says Novychenko. Digest supplied title: "Novychenko salvos against formalism and subjectivity in prose."

A1057. Novychenko, Leonid. "On current literary criticism." Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 7(292) (1972): 128-132.

The most important thing for the literary critic, says Novychenko, is to be able "to give the reader a social education", to be able "by the force of his own ideas, by his whole analysis to extend and enrich the social meaning of the creative artist's discoveries in the study of man, and this requires that the literary critic be receptive to the social dynamism of the age." Novychenko singles out by name some of the new Russian writers and those in his "own native Ukrainian literature", and discusses the recently published resolution of the Central Committee at the 24th Congress of the Communist Party regarding literary criticism.

A1058 Novychenko, Leonid. "Unity." / Leonid Novichenko. Tr. by Hilda Perham. Soviet Literature. 5 (302) (1973): 164-170.

Novychenko speaks of the progress made in Soviet times in Ukrainian prose, poetry, dramaturgy and literature for children. He considers Ukrainian literature to be "inseparable part of the multinational Soviet literature". The main thing, says Novychenko, "is that my own (in this case Ukrainian) literature is an organic part of the young, irresistibly developing international world of the artistic culture of socialism." Ukrainian literature, according to Novychenko, has had an "unprecedented widening of international horizons", it's leading theme "has been and remains" "the formation of the new man, the fighter for socialism, the builder of communist society", it has "come closer to the great diversity of the people's life..."

A1059. Novychenko, Leonid. "A voice from the banks of the Psel (River)." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.10 (October 1976): 20-21. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (24 August 1976): 2].

A critic's reaction to recent poetry by Volodymyr Zatulyviter published in the August issue of Vitchyzna. This publication, according to Novychenko, "signals the ripening of talent, of creative maturity". Novychenko speaks of "freshness of thought", "sound artistic craftsmanship", "individual peculiarity of artistic thought" in Zatulyviter's new poetry. Digest's title: "Novychenko acclaims new poet."

A1060. Novychenko, Leonid. "A word about great deeds." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.6 (June 1975): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (24 April 1975): 2-3].

Among Soviet Ukrainian works about the "Great Patriotic War" [i.e. World War II] Novychenko singles out Kozachenko's Tsina zhyttia, Korniichuk's Front, Malyshko's poem "Prometei", Honchar's Praporonostsi and Stel'makh's Duma pro tebe. The Digest's title: "Novychenko on the literature of W.W.II."

A1061. Nytchenko, Dmytro. "Extinction of Ukrainian literature and arts under the Russian occupation." / D. Nytchenko. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.4 (Winter 1966): 8-16.

The author uses book publication data as an indicator of historical cultural development prior to the 18th century and discusses Russification measures both of the Tsarist and of Soviet Russia with regard to Ukrainian publications. Some data is provided about the persecution of Ukrainian writers in the thirties, about the enforced Russification and personnel purges in the educational system, about the removal of valuable Ukrainian books from libraries, as well as destruction of whole library collections.

A1062. Obolensky, Dimitri. "Early Russian literature (1000-1300)." An Introduction to Russian Language and Literature. Ed. by Robert Auty and Dimitri Obolensky. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977. (Companion to Russian studies, 2). 56-82.

A discussion of the literature of Kyivan Rus' with separate subsections devoted to translated literature and original literature, the latter further divided into brief sections on sermons, hagiography, the Primary Chronicle, pilgrimages, heroic poetry (covering also Slovo o polku Ihorevim), the 'Supplication of Daniel the prisoner', "works concerned with the Tatar invasion" and princely biographies. Obolensky's chapter is followed by "Guide to further reading" (pp.83-89), with recommended multilingual bibliographical listings arranged under specific subjects, with critical comments. The terms "Russian state", "Russian nation", "Russian literature" and "Kievan Russia" are used throughout the article.

A1063. Obolensky, Dimitri. "Medieval Russian culture in the writings of D.S. Likhachev." Oxford Slavonic Papers. n.s. 9 (1976): 1-16.

A critical survey of the principal works of D. Likhachov on the occasion of his seventieth birthday. Obolensky attempts to assess Likhachov's contribution to the study of medieval chronicles, the Slovo o polku Ihorevim, and the literary and cultural history of Kyivan Rus. Says Obolensky about Likhachov: "A notable feature of Likhachev's work on Russian chronicles and on the Slovo o polku Igoreve is his ability to combine the technique of minute textual analysis with broader literary and historical perspectives designed to test the validity of generalizations made from a comparative study of the relevant material." And later: "In some respects his general approach to literary problems is not unlike that of Dmitry Chizhevsky. But in his treatment of textological problems, his perception of the relations between literature and painting, and his inquiries into problems of style he has an originality and a profundity that are all his own."

A1064. "O. Olzhych, pseud. Oleh Kandyba (1908-1944)." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 25.6 (294) (June 1974): 15.

An unsigned biographical note.

A1065. "Of love and hate". Ukrainian Canadian. 27.577 (70) (February 1975): 35-36. port. on 35.

An unsigned note about Mykhailo Stel'makh with his portrait to accompany a translated excerpt from his novel in the same issue. [cf. T394]. Says the anonymous author about Stel'makh: "His novels are a history of the Ukrainian peasantry... The writer created character- studies of devoted builders and defenders of Soviet power, complex in their sublime simplicity... Stel'makh's novels have a highly modern impact, although most of them deal with a remote period. The lifeline of contemporaneity is evident in the author's message, in his affirmation of modern man's high moral and aesthetic qualities, his passionate hatred of everything that is mean and bad."

A1066. Ohloblyn, Oleksander. "Ancestry of Mykola Gogol (Hohol)." Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 12.1-2 (33- 34) (1969-1972): 3-43.

Nikolai Gogol, whose ancestry both on his father's and on his mother's side was Ukrainian, wrote in Russian and is outside the scope of this bibliography. His father, however, was a minor Ukrainian writer, Vasyl' Hohol'-Ianovs'kyi (Yanovs'kyy in text). Ohloblyn's detailed biographical research paper may be of interest, therefore, to students of both Ukrainian and Russian literature. Ohloblyn takes issue with a negative approach to Gogol's lineage in some Soviet Gogol scholarship where a tendency exists, according to Ohloblyn, to place Gogol "as low as possible on the social scale of his times." Ohloblyn traces the ancestry of Nikolai Gogol on his father's side and concludes that "Through the marriage of Opanas Hohol'-Yanovs'kyy and Tetyana Lyzohub the Hohol' family became related, in addition to their relationships with the Lyzohub, Tans'kyy and Zabila families, with several other aristocratic families, notably with families of hetmans, with the Doroshenko and Skoropads'kyy families in particular. Thus Mykola Gogol was a direct descendant of the Hetmans Mykhaylo and Petro Doroshenko... and of Hetman Ivan Skoropads'kyy". Nikolai Gogol's mother, Mariya Ivanivna, 1791-1868, according to Ohloblyn, "came from the Kosyarovs'kyy family. They were a family of Cossack officials in the Poltava region, related to the Troshchyns'kyy, Lukashevych and other families of the officer class and were descended from Leontiy Pavlovych Kosyarovs'kyy, a prominent military companion of the Lubni regiment (1710). After his military service the father of Vasyl Hohol'-Yanovs'kyy's wife, Ivan Matviyevich Kosyarovs'kyy, was not an ordinary "postal official", but postmaster of the Kharkiv province - a rather prominent position at the close of the eighteenth century."

A1067. Ohloblyn, Alexander. "Michael Hrushevsky - foremost Ukrainian historian: On the centennial of his birth (1866-1966)." Ukrainian Quarterly. 22.4 (Winter 1966): 322-333.

A biography of Mykhailo Hrushevs'kyi and an analysis of his principal scholarly views. Hrushevs'kyi's contribution to literature and literary scholarship is mentioned, but the emphasis is on historiography.

A1068. "Oksana Liaturynska." Ukrainian Quarterly. 26.2 (Summer 1970): 218.

A brief obituary in the "Chronicle of current events" of the poet Oksana Liaturyns'ka who died in Minneapolis on 13 June 1970 at the age of 68.

A1069. "Oleinik, Boris Il'ich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 18 (1978): 428-429. Biblio.

An unsigned bio-bibliographical note of 10 lines about the Ukrainian poet Borys Oliinyk, born 1935.

A1070. "Olena Teliha." / MZO. Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 29.2 (February 1972): 26-27.

A biography and an appreciation on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the poet's tragic death at the hands of the Gestapo in Kyiv in 1942.

A1071. "Oles Berdnyk persecuted by the KGB." ABN Correspondence. 23.3 (May-June 1972): 47.

According to this news item, the Bureau of Literary Propaganda [sic] at the Writers' Union of Ukraine "formally banned all public appearances by O. Berdnyk." Berdnyk, according to this unsigned note, "familiarized his audiences with the basic teachings of Christianity, Buddhism and other religions... and focused attention on the need to cultivate and to perfect the human spirit..."

A1072. "Oles Honchar - standard bearer of modern Ukrainian literature." Ukraine. 2(34) (1978): 18-19. illus., port.

Unsigned article illustrated with a group photo with Honchar on p.19 and a full page portrait in color on p.18. "Today Oles Honchar is probably the most published and translated Ukrainian author in the Soviet Union. His books have been published in over 17 million copies and translated in many foreign countries", claims the article.

A1073. "Oleynik, Boris Ilich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 453.

Bio-bibliographical data for the poet Borys Oliinyk, born 1935. (15 lines).

A1074. "Oleynik, Stepan Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 453.

A 43-line bio-bibliographical note about the satirical poet Stepan Oliinyk, born 1908.

A1075. "Olga Kobylyanska: a classic of Ukrainian literature." Ukrainian Canadian. 22.510 (4) (February 1969): 38-39. port.

An unsigned article about Ol'ha Kobylians'ka with her b/w portrait (a woodcut by W.Y. Chebanik). The article provides some data about Kobylians'ka's life, her literary friendships, her pre-occupation with the fate of women and some descriptive comments about her works, especially about the novel Zemlia. Kobylians'ka's Zemlia is the basis for the play "Adam's Sons" by Hannah Polowy and Mitch Sago, excerpts of which are published in the same issue [cf. T306].

A1076. "Olha Kobylianska." Promin'. 10.11 (November 1969): 15. Port.

A brief unsigned biographical note, with portrait.

A1077. Oliinyk, Borys. "At the 6th Congress of the Writers of the USSR. Speech of Borys Oliynyk." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.8 (August 1976): 21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (29 June 1976): 2-3].

The Digest's title: "Oliynyk deplores uniformity in poetry." ".... uniformity is contraindicative for poets!", says Oliinyk, but finds that recent Soviet poetry collections evoke "a feeling of uniformity, monotony, sameness, not only in the thematic respect, but even in intonation, in arrangement, in orchestration, in the poems' structures of imagery." According to Oliinyk, "we see the emergence of a kind of literary dependent, who follows the road of least resistance, working with age-old cliches and stereotypes, intelligently imitating true poetry."

A1078. Oliinyk, Borys. "The civic spirit of the Soviet Ukrainian poetry. Report of Secretary of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine Borys Oliynyk." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 [sic, i.e.5] (May 1977): 14- 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (25 March 1977): 4].

Oliinyk spoke at the Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine on 17 March. He urged "principleminded discussions, comprehensive and profound reviews of poetry in an all Union or a world context" to avoid the "very low artistic level" which, in his view, characterizes many recent book debuts of young poets. The Digest's title: "Oliynyk scores editorial indulgence toward young writers."

A1079. Oliinyk, Borys. "Ukrainians live in Poland." / Borys Oliynyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.5 (May 1968): 25-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (12 April 1968): 4].

The poet Borys Oliinyk visited Ukrainian centers in Warsaw, Stargard, Szczecin, Koszalin, Gda sk, Olsztyn and Bia y Bor. He writes about the great interest of Ukrainians in Poland in Ukrainian literature and life in Ukraine, about their Ukrainian language publications - Nashe slovo, Nasha kultura, Ukrains'kyi kalendar, Homin (literary anthology), and their Ukrainian schools. The Digest's title reads: "Writer finds active Ukrainian centers in Poland. Calls for cultural exchange with compatriots."

A1080. Oliinyk, Mykola. "On wings of song" / Mykola Oliynik. Ukrainian Canadian. 23.532 (53) (February 1971): 26-29. illus., ports.

About Lesia Ukrainka's interest in music, her unfulfilled dream of becoming a musician and her contribution toward the collection and preservation of Ukrainian oral follore.

A1081. Oliynyk, Vitaliy. "Ripe needs". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 19-20. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 May 1970): 2].

The author calls for reprints of bibliographies of ukrainian literature by Komarov, Levytskyi, Leites and Iashek, for a new expanded and corrected edition of the 1960-1965 five-volume edition of bio-bibliographical dictionary of Ukrainian writers, and above all for the publication of a Ukrainian literary encyclopedia which would "resurrect from oblivion" many names in Ukrainian literary history. The Digest's title" "urges publishing of Ukrainian literary and theatrical encyclopedias."

A1082. Olynyk, Marta D. "A selected bibliography of works by and about Lina Kostenko." Nationalities Papers. 7.2 (Fall 1979): 213-219.

A listing of Lina Kostenko's Ukrainian works, as well as translations and works about her supplemented with a three page introduction. "While she discovered no new poetic forms, Kostenko reintroduced the pure lyric genre and the concept of a genuinely creative process into the pallid Soviet Ukrainian literary scene," says M.D. Olynyk.

A1083. Olynyk, Roman. "Dmytro Dontsov and Jurij Klen, 1933-1939." / Roman Olynyk (Rakhmanny). Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1975-1976. 6 (1975-1976): 65- 68. Biblio.

Summary of a paper read on 11 March 1976 by Dr. Roman Olynyk of McGill University and of the discussion that followed the presentation. The speaker discussed the relationship between the editor of Vistnyk Dmytro Dontsov and Vistnyk's collaborator, the émigré poet Iurii Klen, then living in Germany, as it is reflected in Dontsov's unpublished correspodence.

A1084. Olynyk, Roman. "Panteleimon Kulish and his Yevgenii Onegin nashego vremeni." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 9.2 (1967): 201- 215.

Ievgenii Onegin nashego vremeni: roman v stikhakh ia an autobiographical novel in verse written in Russian in 1847 by Panteleimon Kulish during the time of his banishment to Tula, which followed his arrest and conviction in the in the case of the Kyrylo-Metodiivs'ke Bratstvo. The work was written in imitation of Pushkin. Kulish, according to Roman Olynyk, "used Pushkin's rhythmic form, he imitated his plot, copied some scenes and emulated his handling of the subject." Kulish's novel in verse, claims the author, was written to impress the Russian censors of his change of heart and to help "obtain his release from his bondage in Tula". In that he did not succeed. Olynyk analyzes Kulish's work, comparing it with Pushkin's. He concludes that Kulish's poem "is of doubtful quality" as a work of art, but is nonetheless a "meaningful document" illustrating "the influence of Pushkin's genius on the younger generation of Russian and Ukrainian intellectuals" and "a strong bond of affinity and understanding between the Russian and Ukrainian intellectuals" that existed at the time in Tsarist Russia.

A1085. Olynyk, Roman. "The Prague Group of Ukrainian nationalist writers and their ideological origins." Czechoslovakia Past and Present. Ed. by Miloslav Rechcigl, Jr. v.2. Essays on the Arts and Sciences. The Hague: Published under the auspices of the Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences in America by Mouton, 1968. 1022- 1031.

In the 1920's and 1930's Prague was the center of Ukrainian intellectual and cultural life. According to Olynyk, it was "the most productive and influential of the three émigré centers of Ukrainian nationalist literary production; the other two were in Lviv and Warsaw." Olynyk discusses briefly the work of Iurii Darahan, Oleksa Stefanovych, Oksana Liaturyns'ka, Oleh Ol'zhych, Olena Teliha, Evhen Malaniuk, Leonid Mosendz and Ulas Samchuk and their ideological connections to the Lviv based nationalist literary journal Vistnyk and its editor Dmytro Dontsov and comes to the following conclusions: "They formed a psychologically insulated group within the body of a foreign, though friendly, nation." ..."They... were too involved in current Ukrainian events to be able either to follow the path of their Czech colleagues or to 'open the window into Europe', as they had intended." ..."The most admirable thing about them was that they succeeded in attaining relatively high standards, in spite of, rather than as a result of, their ideology of integral nationalism." Originally a paper presented at the Second Congress of the Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences in America at Columbia University, 11-13 September 1964.

A1086. Olynyk, Roman. "The Prague group of Ukrainian nationalist writers and their ideological origins." / Roman Rakhmanny. In his In Defense of the Ukrainian Cause / Roman Rakhmanny. Ed. by Stephen D. Olynyk. North Quincy, MA: Christopher [©1979]. 238-249.

Reprinted from Czechoslovakia Past and Present, v.2 [cf. A1085].

A1087. "On the anniversary of a great poet." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.532 (53) (February 1971): 31. port.

An unsigned article for children about Lesia Ukrainka. Published in the "Junior UC" section.

A1088. "On the anniversary of a great writer." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.535 (56)(May 1971): 46. port.

About Vasyl' Stefanyk for young readers of the "Junior UC" section.

A1089. "On the edge of epochs." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.10 (October 1966): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 August 1966): 2-4].

About Ivan Franko's contributions in the field of foreign and comparative literary criticism, research and translations, especially in the area of Slavic, German and Oriental studies. The title supplied by the Digest: "Ivan Franko - interpreter of world literature."

A1090. "On the eve of the 80th anniversary..." Ukraine. 1(5) (1971): 7. illus.

A brief note about the unveiling of a monument on the graveside of Pavlo Tychyna at the Baikove cemetery in Kyiv. With a black and white photo of the monument.

A1091. "On the frontiers of the ideological struggle." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 6-7. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (4 February 1975)].

Contributors to the Russian journal Literaturnoie obozreniie and literary critics of the Ukrainian journal Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo met for a two-day conference to discuss the problems that confront Soviet literary criticism "in the ideological struggle now under way." Literaturna Ukraina publishes on this occasion interviews with some of the participants, i.e. Yuriy Surovtsev, Viktor Belayev [Byelayev] and Ihor Dzeverin. The Digest's title: "Moscow and Kiev critics confer on role in ideological struggle."

A1092. "On the level with contemporary needs. In the Commission on Criticism at the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 8-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (28 November 1972): 3].

About a meeting of the Commission held on 23 November 1972 under the chairmanship of M. Ostryk. The main topic under discussion: "The tasks of literary criticism in the struggle against the ideological diversionary activities of Ukrainian bourgeois nationalism." V. Ievdokymenko [Yevdokymenko] and V. Mykytas' "described the new forms of bourgeois propaganda", V. Lysenko reported on Vitchyzna's criticism department. K. Volyns'kyi [Volynskyy], L. Kovalenko, V. Donchyk, P. Kolesnyk, P. Kononenko took part in the discussion. It was noted that Vitchyzna "conducts the most consistent and qualified discussion on poetry", but its analysis of Ukrainian prose is "on a considerably weaker level". An alarm was raised that "certain works with historical themes are marred by the extra-class, extra-historical positions maintained by their authors." The Digest's title: "Vitchyzna's literary criticism discussed in Ukrainian Writers' Union."

A1093. "On the participation of the republican organization in the preparations for the 25th Congress of the CPSU and the 25th Congress of the CP Ukraine and on the convocation of the 7th regular congress of the Writers of Soviet Ukraine. Resolution of the 7th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.1 (January 1976): 18-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (12 December 1975): 1].

The Digest's title: "UWU Executive Board Plenum sets April date for Seventh Writers' Congress". Says the resolution: "Our primary and most important tasks are to greet the 25th Congress of the Leninist party with new, valuable works in all branches of literature, to systematically raise the ideological and theoretical level and the craftsmanship of members of the Writers' Union." The 7th Congress of the Union of Writers of Ukraine is to be held on 14-16 April 1976 in Kyiv.

A1094. Onopriyenko, Nina. "To the hearts of readers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.6 (June 1971): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (27 April 1971): 2].

Assistant director of the UkSSR State CPSU Library discusses the demands of readers which are not met because of limited editions of Ukrainian literary works. There are 27,000 public libraries in Ukraine, says Onopriyenko, while the works of poet-laureates are published in editions not exceeding 8,000 copies, works of H. Kosynka were published in editions of 12,000 and 50,000, lives of the famous series, which is very popular among readers, is published in editions no larger than 15-30,000 copies. The Digest's title: "Calls for larger editions of Ukrainian works."

A1095. Onyshkevych, Larissa. "Existentialism in modern Ukrainian drama." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. / Larissa M. L. Onyshkevych. 4 (1973-1974): 28-31. Biblio.

A summary of the paper presented on 6 December 1973 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed existentialist elements in the dramas "Dyzharmoniia" (Disharmony) by Volodymyr Vynnychenko, "Patetychna sonata" (Sonata Pathetique) by Mykola Kulish, "Diistvo pro velyku liudynu" (A Play About a Great Man) by Ihor Kostets'kyi and "Holod" (Hunger) by Bohdan Boychuk.

A1096. Onyshkevych, Larissa. "Existentialism in modern Ukrainian drama." / Onyshkevych, Larissa Maria Lubov Zaleska. Dissertation Abstracts International. 34.12 (June 1974): 7773-A.

An abstract of a 1973 PhD. dissertation at the University of Pennsylvania.

Eight Ukrainian plays are analyzed in terms of the three stages of man's existential quest, i.e. "In the wilderness" ("U pushchi", 1895-1909) by Lesia Ukrainka, "Disharmony" ("Dyzharmonia", 1905) by Volodymyr Vynnychenko, "Along the road to a fairytale land" ("Po dorozi v kazku" 1910) by Oleksander Oles', "Sonata Pathetique" ("Patetychna sonata", 1929- 1931) by Mykola Kulish, "A Play about George the Conqueror" ("Diistvo pro Iuriia Peremozhtsia", 1947) by Iurii Kosach, "The heroine dies in the first act" ("Heroinia pomyraie v pershomu akti", 1948) by Liudmyla Kovalenko, "A play about a great man" ("Diistvo pro velyku liudynu", 1948) by Ihor Kostets'kyi [Eaghor G. Kostetzky, in text] and "Hunger" ("Holod", 1961- 1962) by Bohdan Boichuk [Bojčuk]. "Specific characteristics which are dominant in the Ukrainian existentialist plays are", says Onyshkevych, "1/ In man's search for authenticity there is always a very strong emphasis on his responsibility and sacrifice for other people; 2/ Although the protagonists usually face a tragic end, they achieve transcendence by providing a better future for others and thus the ever-present element of hope is stressed; 3/ In terms of style or structure several Ukrainian plays combine contemporary literary and theatrical devices with those of the traditional Ukrainian theatre."

The dissertation, 184 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no. 74-14,120.

A1097. Onyshkevych, Larissa. "F. Kolessa's reissued works on folklore" / Larissa M.L. Z. Onyshkevych. Iuvileinyi zbirnyk Ukraïns'koï Vil'noï Akademiï Nauk v Kanadi = The Jubilee Collection of the Ukrainian Free Academy of Sciences in Canada. Ed. by O.W. Gerus, A. Baran, J. Rozumnyj. Winnipeg: UVAN, 1976. 262-274.

A review article of three publications by Filaret Kolessa (1871-1947), an outstanding Ukrainian folklore specialist. The works reviewed are: Melodii ukrains'kykh narodnykh dum (Kyiv: Naukova dumka. 1969. 588 p.) - a work about the musical scores of dumy; Muzykoznavchi pratsi (Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1970, 592 p.) - a collection of Kolessa's musicological studies; and Folklorystychni pratsi (Kyiv: Naukova dumka, 1970) - Kolessa's articles on Ukrainian folklore and folklore elements in the poetry of Shevchenko, Franko, Shashkevych. Reviewer considers these publications of "immense value and importance" and "indispensable to the serious students of Ukrainian literature or of Slavic folklore".

A1098. "Onyshkevych, Larissa Maria Lubov." World Who's Who of Women. 4th ed. (1978): 877. port.

Twenty-three lines, with portrait, about Larissa Onyshkevych.

A1099. Opanasyuk, Olexiy. "And merry ripples of my native Sluch." Ukraine. 1(5) (1971): 12. illus.

An article about the Lesia Ukrainka museum in the town of Zviahel or Novohrad-Volynskyi situated in the house where the poet was born. The article is illustrated with a childhood photo of Lesia and portraits of her parents Olena Pchilka (Ol'ha Kosach) and Petro Kosach and her uncle Mykhailo Drahomanov. A full page photograph on the opposite page depicts the river Sluch near Novohrad-Volynskyi. This issue of Ukraine commemorates the birth centennial of Lesia Ukrainka and has her portrait in color on the cover. Full page b/w linocut by Heorhiy Malakov on p.[25] is an illustration to Lesia Ukrainka's poem "Robert Bruce, King of Scotland". See also other material from this issue [cf. A1567, T472].

A1100. Opanasyuk, Olexiy. "And merry ripples of my native Sluch: commemorating the birth of Lesya Ukrainka, February 25, 1871". Ukrainian Canadian. 25.566 (59) (February 1974): 32-33. illus.

About the Lesia Ukrainka Museum in the town of Novohrad-Volynskyi (Zviahel). The museum is situated in the house in which Lesia Ukrainka was born and where she spent the early years of her childhood, before the Kosach family moved to Lutsk in 1879. The article [apparently a reprint from Ukraine, cf. A1099] is illustrated with portraits of the little Lesia, her parents Olha Kosach and Petro Kosach and her uncle Mykhailo Drahomanov.

A1101. "Open letter to the editor of Literaturna Ukraina" Ukrainian Review (London). 16.4 (Winter 1969): 66-67.

A letter of protest - a reaction to an article by O. Poltorats'kyi published in Literaturna Ukraina in the 16 July 1968 issue under the title "Whom do some humanists protect". The letter of protest was signed by Ivan Dziuba [Dzyuba in text], Ievhen Sverstiuk, Mykhailyna Kotsiubyns'ka, Lina Kostenko and Viktor Nekrasov. See also A1476.

A1102. "Oppose Soviet-made statue of Lesya Ukrainka." Ukrainian Quarterly. 32.4 (Winter 1976): 444.

According to this news item in the "Chronicle of current events", "The Saskatoon City Council rejected an offer by the Soviet Union to unveil a monument in Saskatoon of Lesya Ukrainka... but the local UCC Branch said that University of Saskatoon officials are considering approving the proposal."

A1102a. Orel, Vasyl. "Kuban writer - Yakiv Kykharenko [sic], 1799-1862." / Vasil Orel. Forum. 16 (Spring 1971): 20-22. port.

About Iakiv Kukharenko, Ukrainian writer and a friend of Taras Shevchenko. Kukharenko was the author of a play "Chornomorskyi pobut na Kubani", a folk tale "Voronyi kin", and some works in Russian.

A1103. Osadchyi, Mykhailo. "I was tried for literary and art works, writes M. Osadchy." Ukrainian Review (London). 25.2 (Summer 1978): 93-94.

Translation of a samvydav document circulating in Ukraine. It is a letter of the writer Mykhailo Osadchyi, currently a Soviet prisoner, addressed to the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR.

A1104. Osadchyi, Mykhailo. "Tried for literary and art works." ABN Correspondence. 29.2 (March-April 1978): 36-37.

A letter to the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR from Mykhailo Osadchyi, an imprisoned Ukrainian writer, who demands his release and rehabilitation. Osadchyi, according to a brief editorial note appended, was arrested in 1972 and sentenced to seven years of camps and three years of exile.

A1105. "Osadchyi, Mykhaylo Hryhorovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 74-75. port.

Data about the dissident activities and imprisonment of Mykhailo Osadchyi, the writer born 1926. (22 lines).

A1106. Osadchy's letter published." ABN Correspondence. 30.3 (May-June 1979): 37-38.

Reprint from National Review, 27 October 1978 issue, of two letters: one, by Askold Skalsky addressed to William F. Buckley, Jr. asking for the publication of Osadchyi's letter, and the letter by Mykhailo Osadchyi addressed to American people and the President of the USA asking for help in securing his release from Soviet prison.

A1107. Osadchyi, Vasyl'. "About Mister Stetsko and the martyred toad." / Vasyl Osadchyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.11 (November 1966): 14-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Perets. 17 (September 1966): 5].

A call on Ivan Dziuba to take a stand against the emigré "bourgeois-nationalists" who "vie with each other to put on the garb of great martyrs and raize on their shield as some icon figure of I. Dzyuba for allegedly opposing the Soviet people, Leninist ideas, and the communist outlook." Digest's title: "Ivan Dzyuba - target of Perets' attack."

A1108. Ostrowski, Donald G. "Textual criticism and the text of the Povest' vremennyx let." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1978-1979. 9 (1978-1979): 50-54. Biblio.

A summary of a paper presented on 15 February 1979 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker expressed his view that past scholarly work on the Povist' vremennykh lit "has been at best inadequate and at worst sloppy and misleading" and discussed some of the theoretical principles behind textual criticism.

A1109. Ostryk, Mykhailo. "Horizons of critical thought." / Mykhaylo Ostryk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.10 (October 1969): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. 16 September 1969): 1-3].

A critical reaction to materials published in Vitchyzna. Vitchyzna and other journals are accused of self-imposed censorship, of "irresponsible omissions of facts and related conclusions." The Digest's title: "Clumsy censorship mocked".

A1110. Ostryk, Mykhailo. "Seekings, defeats and victories."/ Mykhaylo Ostryk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.5 (May 1966): 22-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (5 April 1966): 4].

About the revival of Mykola Kulish's play "Patetychna sonata" at the Ivan Franko theater in Kyiv. The producer, D. Aleksidze, is quoted as saying: "I deeply penetrated the meaning of the play and did much to reproduce it in depth and in vivid scenic form, conforming to the artistic searchings of the playwright..." About the play itself, the author says: "The Ukrainian bourgeois- nationalists attempted to redo our forgotten Sonata Pathetique their own way. During the war they published its text so 're-edited' that nothing was left of the author's own thoughts. Otherwise they could not have used it: it was directed against the ideology of bourgeois- nationalism. The same kind of forgery appeared in an edition published in New York in 1955." The Digest's title reads: "After 35 years once banned play is shown in Ukraine."

A1111. "Osvita 1979." Forum. 42 (Summer 1979): 13-15. illus.

An illustrated report on the Osvita 1979 Symposium on Ukrainian Canadian Writing which took place at the University of Regina on 15-16 June 1979. Among the topics discussed at the symposium were "Ukrainian literature in Canada" presented by Yar Slavutych and "The English language as a medium for Ukrainian literature" by Hannah Polowy.

A1112. "Our guidelines - party principles and militancy. The Ukrainian Writers' Union Commission on Criticism discusses materials on literary criticism in Zhovten'." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.12 (December 1972): 9-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 October 1972): 2].

The meeting of the Commission took place on 17 October, with L. Novychenko as chairman. The report on Zhovten's department of criticism was delivered by M. Ilnytskyi. The participants criticized Zhovten' for not having enough articles directed against Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists, for not having taken a stand with respect to such works as Poltva by R. Andriashyk, Malvy by R. Ivanychuk, Zorianyi korsar by O. Berdnyk, Mech Areia by I. Bilyk. Participating in the discussion were M. Ostryk, Ye. Voloshko, L. Sanov, I. Zub, F. Pohrebennyk, I. Dzeverin, L. Novychenko, R. Fedoriv. The Digest's title: "Zhovten' literary criticism found lacking in depth and partymindedness".

A1113. "Our inspired creativity - for the party, for the people! Expanded meeting of the Presidium and the Party Committee of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.2 (February 1975): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 January 1975): 1].

A response of Ukrainian writers to the Appeal to the Party and the Soviet People issued by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. A resolution was passed to express praise for the domestic and foreign policies of the CPSU in which the writers pledge to create "new works about our heroic contemporary, highly artistic works that will help to educate the people of the communist future..." The Digest's title: "Writers' Presidium and Party Committee meets, pass resolution on Central Committee Appeal."

A1114. Ovcharenko, F.D. "The work of the people - the source of the artist's inspiration." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.5 (May 1971): 19-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Komunist Ukrainy. 1 (January 1971): 11-20].

The author, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine, says, among other things: "Unfortunately, we notice that the works of a number of authors are marked by superficiality, a lack of concrete knowledge of the life of workers and peasants..." Ovcharenko mentions in this context P. Lanovenko's novel U vsiakoho svoia dolia, as well as P. Zahrebel'nyi's Z pohliadu vichnosti, M. Zarudnyi's Uran, Ie. Hutsalo's Serpen', spalakh liubovi. Ovcharenko warns that "recent events in Czechoslovakia"..."began from seemingly innocent formal experimentation..." "...esthetic pluralism inevitably leads to ideological and political pluralism."

The Digest's title: "Ovcharenko calls for profounder treatment of worker theme in literature."

A1115. Ovcharenko, Maria. "Lina Kostenko - the poet of the freedom of spirit and of the truth of the word." / Maria M. Ovcharenko. Ukrainian Review (London). 22 [i.e. 23].1 (Spring 1976): 21-30.

A study of Lina Kostenko's poetry based on the first three collections of her poems: Prominnia zemli (Kyiv: Molod, 1957), Vitryla (Kyiv: Radians'kyi pys'mennyk, 1958) and Mandrivky sertsia (Kyiv: Radians'kyi pys'mennyk, 1961). "The thematic variety" [of Lina Kostenko's poetry] "corresponds to a wide range of forms and genres of her poems," says Ovcharenko. "She handles with the same ease short and long poems, allegoric fables, miniature paintings of nature, and, in particular, short aphoristic poems. With a wealth of technical means at her command, she displays an extraordinary skill in different metrical and strophical devices; however, she avoids both strict classical rigidity and excessive modernistic experimentation", says Ovcharenko. The author calls special attention to Kostenko's "talent to invent highly poetic and colourful metaphors, symbols and interesting images, especially when she uses concrete objects for abstract ideas and inferences." A number of poems or fragments of poems are quoted for illustration purposes. The longer fragments are: Silence sits at my bedside (16 lines, p.23). Music (I am opening the dawn with the G clef)(15 lines, p.23). Evening (On the dark sea) (12 lines, p.24). Poetry is my roentgenogram (8 lines, p.24). Every moment of my life (7 lines, p.25). In front of the portrait of a woman with child (Gentle woman!) (8 lines, p.25). No fear, no compromise (6 lines, p.28). The high idea doesn't know how to bend (15 lines, p.29). For identifications of the translated poems see Index. translations

A1116. Ovcharenko, Maria. "The poets of spirit and truth: Lina Kostenko and Vasyl Symonenko." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.1 (Spring 1973): 71-82.

The two poets are considered in separate chapters, after a two-page general introduction (Kostenko on pp.73-79, Symonenko on pp.79-82). Kostenko, says Ovcharenko, is "a genuine master of verse with harmonius and crystallized world outlook, with a feeling of responsibility for a poet's high mission, with a sense of human dignity." Ovcharenko notes Kostenko's "sunny good-natured humour", her "optimistic outlook on the world", her "glorification of life", and "boundless confidence in people", as well as her "merciless, sharp satire", especially her "sharp satirical condemnation of servile flattery and careerism." Ovcharenko considers Kostenko "an extraordinary phenomenon in contemporary Ukrainian literature". In her view, "Lina Kostenko's great adherence to principles, the broad diapason of her poetic scope which includes both gentle lyricism and philosophical intellectualism, and the brilliant artistic form of her works place her in the ranks of the greatest contemporary Ukrainian poets."

Symonenko, says Ovcharenko, - "the boldest and therefore the most popular of the poets of the sixties", "reaches genuine, Shevchenko-like heights and the highest tension in tragic patriotism in works in which he indicts Russian tyranny and the deceptive system of the Bolshevik regime."

Among the fragments of poetry quoted in unattributed translations, the following are the longest: Kostenko : I grew up in orchards (11 lines, p.74); Every moment of my life was saved by someone (6 lines, p.75); My grandfather Mykhaylo was a temple builder (5 lines, p.78); Symonenko : Are you aware you are a man (5 lines, p.76); Then I rejoice in your name (6 lines, p.80); Why is he a thief? On what grounds? (8 lines, p.81); I burned for you (8 lines, p.82). For identifications of individual poems see Index.

1117. "Ovsiyenko, Vasyl." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 76.

Eight lines of data about dissident activities of Vasyl' Ovsiienko, a teacher of literature born in 1949.

A1118. Ozernyuk, Ya. "Horizons of life and literature." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.7 (July 1968): 22. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (7 July 1968): 1].

A report on the election meeting of the Dnipropetrovske branch of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. Says the author: "The meeting listened to criticism of ideologically immature works, errors and oversights in the works of individual authors." The Digest supplied title reads: "Leadership shake-up in oblast writers' clubs". See also A333.

A1119. Page, Tanya. "The literature of Old Rus' in the writings of A.N. Radiščev." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1977-1978. 8 (1977-1978): 64-66. Biblio.

Summary of the seminar held on 13 April 1979 and of the discussion that followed. According to the speaker, a professor at the University of Oregon, A.N. Radishchev used Slovo o polku Ihorevim, Povest vremennykh let and Nestor's Zhytiie Feodosiia, both as an inspiration and to promote his own views on law and morality.

A1120. "Pages of history: Alexander Dovzhenko." Soviet Film. 1 (116) (January 1967): 24-25. illus.

An unsigned illustrated article about Oleksandr Dovzhenko with a focus on his films "Zvenyhora", "Arsenal" and "Zemlia". Says the unidentified author about "Zvenyhora": "In it he gave a philosophical interpretation to the Ukrainian folk-legend about the search for hidden treasure, seeing it as man's constant search for happiness and asserting that only freedom can bring happiness." "The Earth...", says the author, "proved to be an artistic triumph for this poet of the cinema. It is about Ukrainian peasants during the period of collectivization. Here the poetic idea is expressed not through metaphor, as in his previous pictures, but in lifelike images..."

A1121. "Panas Mirniy". Ukrainian Canadian. 527 (21) (September 1970): 34. port.

An unsigned biographical note about Panas Myrnyi to accompany the translation of an excerpt from his story Lykhi liudy in the same issue. [cf. T257].

A1122. "Panas Mirniy". Ukrainian Canadian. 23.537 (58) (July/August 1971): 41. port.

An unsigned note about Panas Myrnyi to accompany the translation of Chapter 1 of his novel Khiba revut' voly, iak iasla povni? published in the same issue. [cf. T258]. Says the note in part: "In his writing Panas Myrniy [sic] depicted the struggle of the peasantry and workers against the bourgeois-feudal system of the period, vividly portraying the grasping, reactionary character of the Ukrainian bourgeoisie and landed gentry." The translated opening chapter of the novel is characterized as "exceptionally beautiful", "where the author lyrically pictures spring in the village and a boy's first love for a girl whose loveliness blends into the scene" "so that she flows out of it like a water-nymph."

A1123. "Panch, Petro (real name: Petr Iosifovich Panchenko)." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 466.

A 55-line bio-bibliographical note about the novelist Petro Panch, born 1891.

A1124. Parfenov, L.A. "Dovzhenko, Aleksandr Petrovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 8 (1975): 394-395. Biblio.

An article (of 54 lines + biblio) about Oleksandr Dovzhenko (1894-1956), the filmmaker and writer. Says Parfenov about Dovzhenko: "Dovzhenko was the scriptwriter of almost all his films and a writer-journalist who affirmed the spiritual wealth and beauty of Soviet man and actively fought for communist morality."

A1125. "A partial list of Ukrainian women arrested and persecuted between 1972-73." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.1 (Spring 1975): 56- 64.

This list of 28 women includes brief biographical profiles of the writers Iryna Stasiv- Kalynets', Iryna Senyk, Ol'ha Duchymins'ka [Duczyminska in text], Iryna Zhylenko [Dzylenko in text], Ol'ha Hel' and Iryna Steshenko.

A1126. "The Party task of criticism." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.3 (March 1973): 8-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 February 1973): 3].

About a meeting of the Criticism Commission of the Writers Union of Ukraine, with Leonid Novychenko presiding. A discussion of the achievements and shortcomings of Ukrainian criticism concluded that "analyses of important problems of Marxist-Leninist esthetics are still weak and in some cases various events and works of the past are erroneously or vaguely appraised." O. Berdnyk's Zorianyi korsar and I. Bilyk's Mech Areia were singled out as ideologically erroneous works that should have been dealt with with firmness and disciplined stand. The Digest's title: "Critics exhorted to adhere to class positions."

A1127. "The Party's trust in us is binding. The Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine discusses the CC CPSU Resolution 'On literary and art criticism'." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.4 (April 1972): 10-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (15 February 1972): 1].

Digest's title: "CPSU Resolution on criticism discussed by writers' union executive board." The session was held on 10 February and chaired by Iurii Smolych. Keynote address was delivered by Mykhailo Ostryk, with an additional speech by L. Novychenko. The speakers gave examples to illustrate what the CC CPSU Resolution called criticism of a "superficial nature and distinguished by a low philosophical and esthetic level, testifying to an inability to correlate the phenomena of life with literature" (recent reviews in Literaturna Ukraina, especially reviews of Andriashyk's "Poltva"), of attempts to rehabilitate and praise literary figures of the past "in spite of the obvious presence of serious deviations from Marxist-Leninist ideology..." (e.g. V. Iaremenko's [Yaremenko's] article on O. Oles). According to Ostryk, there are one hundred critics in the Union of Writers of Ukraine and there is a need to overcome their passivity, as well as their group sentiments and partisanship.

A1128. Pashchenko, A. "Ideological temper of creative workers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.10 (October 1968): 8-9. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (11 September 1968): 2].

The author, who is Communist party secretary for the Dnipropetrovske oblast, calls for an increased training of writers and artists in "problems of Marxist-Leninist esthetics and socialist realism, plus internal and external USSR politics and the conflict of two ideologies..." Says Pashchenko: "There are those who insist that only experts can understand the works of writers, and journalists, and theatrical presentations. Life shows us the error of such thinking. The following is merely one example: when Honchar's somewhat less than successful novel Sobor (Cathedral) was published, workers, kolhosp farmers and the intelligentsia appraised it fairly and accurately. At the same time certain specialists and experts were seriously mistaken in their evaluations." The Digest's title: "Obkom sec'y whips writers, artists into line".

A1129. Pashchenko, Vadym. "Let us consider the needs of our times." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.2 (February 1970): 17-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 December 1969): 2].

The author considers the many translations from French literature into Ukrainian, but calls for the inclusion of many more contemporary French writers. On the other side of the Ukrainian- French literary relations, Pashchenko feels that with a few exceptions (such as Ianovs'kyi's Vershnyky and Rybak's Pomylka Onore de Bal'zaka) "our works are unknown in France". He calls for the establishment of a special publishing house that would specialize in publishing works by Ukrainian authors in the major languages of the world - English, Spanish, French and German. The Digest's title reads: "Calls for large scale translation of Ukrainian works into foreign languages."

A1130. "The passion of the construction profession in our works. From the meeting of the Presidium of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.1 (January 1975): 10-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 November 1974): 1].

Vitchyzna, Raduga, Dnipro, Literaturna Ukraina reported on the activities "of the literary posts at the construction sites of the Five-year plan" and some results of these creative assignments (such as the novel Kanal by I. Hryhurko about the Kakhovka irrigation system, the play Zdrastui, Prypiat' by O. Levada and poetry by I. Drach - both about the Chornobyl atomic power plant). The Digest's title: "Literary periodicals report on patronage of construction sites."

A1131. "Patricia Kilina." / M.O. Nashe zhyttia=Our Life. 27.5 (May 1970): 27. port.

Patrytsiia Kylyna, a Montana born American writer, learned the Ukrainian language during her last year in college, according to this article. She married Ukrainian poet George Tarnawsky and herself began to write poetry in Ukrainian. Patrytsiia Kylyna is the author of Ukrainian poetry collections Trahediia dzmeliv, Lehendy i sny, Rozhevi mista. She is also the author of novels, short story collections and poetry in English. According to the author of this article, Kylyna claims that: "One must think in the language in which the work is to take shape..." and is inspired by the sound of a particular word, or by its connotations beyond the literal meaning. "Reading Miss Kilina's poetry, or conversing with her, one forgets that she was not born a Ukrainian so deep is her concern for our culture and so strong is her feeling of oneness with us," says M.O. Nashe zhyttia=Our Life has chosen Patrytsiia Kylyna as its "young talent for the year 1969" and her portrait appears on the cover of the January 1970 issue.

A1132. Pauls, John P. "Shevchenko on Mazepa." Ukrainian Review (London). 15.3 (Autumn 1968): 59-65.

"Shevchenko's thoughts on Mazepa are expressed in his political poems Velykyi l'okh (The Great Vault), 1845, and Irzhavets' (1847), but we find also some respectful references to the excommunicated hetman in his prose works, such as the story in Russian Bliznetsy (The Twins), 1855..." says Pauls. He analyzes all these sources and quotes excerpts from Shevchenko's poetry in Vera Rich's translation. [i.e. I was still a thoughtless girl (20 lines, pp.61-62); I could hardly reach the house (12 lines, p.62) - both from the poem Velykyi l'okh.

A1133. "Pavlik, Mikhail Ivanovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 19 (1978): 351. Biblio.

Mykhailo Pavlyk (1853-1915) is characterized by GSE as "Ukrainian writer and public figure of revolutionary and democratic views" who, in his short stories "exposed the hypocrisy of bourgeois morality." (17 lines).

A1134. "Pavlychko, Dmitriy Vasilevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 473.

Bio-bibliographical data about the poet Dmytro Pavlychko, born 1929. (24 lines).

A1135. Pavlychko, Dmytro. "False insignia. Reply to Mr. Rakhmanny." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.9 (September 1969): 24-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 August 1969): 3-4].

In a reply to Roman Rakhmannyi's open letter to Ukrainian writers in the USSR, Pavlychko speaks of Honchar's Sobor as having a different meaning for him than the one ascribed to the novel by Rakhmannyi, and of the importance of the Ukrainian-Russian friendship "founded upon common ideals, feelings, aspirations and socialist interests." Roman Rakhmannyi, the source of whose letter is not indicated, is called by Pavlychko a "pusher" of "nationalistic narcotics". The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Pavlychko denounces emigre journalist."

A1136. Pavlychko, Dmytro. "Getting to know a poet or criticism?" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.7 (July 1970): 13-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (19 May 1970): 4].

Pavlychko takes issue with an article by O. Nykanorova published in the March issue of Vitchyzna. The article dealt with the poetry of Ivan Drach and, in Pavlychko's view, "pronounces destructive judgements, and at times even 'death' verdicts" and draws the profile of the poet "in a deliberately negative spirit." The Digest's title: "Pavlychko comes out in defense of Drach."

A1137. Pavlychko, Dmytro. "Poetry and truth." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 [sic, i.e.5] (May 1977): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (27 March 1977): 4].

"... We are well aware that the bourgeois minions regard our poetry as propaganda, that they are afraid to acknowledge that our words contain poetic truth..." says Pavlychko, "Our poetry asserts itself not through declarative statements, but through the incisiveness and truth of its images, through the dreams and thoughts which it inspires in man. We will not weep over the fact that bourgeois writers have not read our works - we do not need their applause..." "We uphold the uniqueness of a noble expression of the spiritual sovereignty of man, but not 'dissent', which leads to the denial and trampling of those truths which make up the strength of mankind's progress," says the author. The Digest's title: "Pavlychko states Soviet poetry upholds man's spiritual sovereignty, but not 'dissent'."

A1130. Pavlychko, Dmytro. "Vsesvit in 1972." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 15.11 (November 1971): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 October 1971): 4].

Editor-in-chief of the journal Vsesvit discusses the changes he plans to introduce in the editorial policies. From now on, creative literature will occupy 2/3 rather than 1/2 of space, says Pavlychko, there will be "a large selection of poetry and articles by contemporary foreign critics". "Along with increased attention to foreign criticism, there will also be certain changes in the selection of prose works. Those selected will have to be of the first order and the subject of lively discussion in their native countries," says Pavlychko. Title supplied by the Digest reads: "Pavlychko announces changes in Vsesvit."

A1139. Pawliw, Orest. "Studies in Ukrainian literature in Canada." Slavs in Canada: Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Canadian Slavs, June 9-11, 1967, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont. [Ottawa]: Inter-University Committee on Canadian Slavs, 1968. v.2. 235-246.

An attempt "to delineate and to indicate... the predominant directions and the developmental tendencies in the field of studies of Ukrainian literature in Canada, accentuating throughout what are generally considered notable achievements..." Pawliw surveys the field from 1909 on when the first two-volume edition of the poetical works of Shevchenko was published in Winnipeg. He singles out Watson Kirkconnell who - in Pawliw's view - made "by far the greatest contribution to the advancement of Ukrainian literature" in the pioneering period. In the new phase, the last 20 years, according to Pawliw, the most valuable works were produced by modern scholars of the philological school - L. Bilets'kyi, I. Ohienko, Dm. Kozii and those who lean to this school in their literary studies, namely C. Andrusyshen, W. Kirkconnell, P. Cundy, C. Bida, J.B. Rudnyckyj and G.Luckyj. One peculiar feature in the studies of Ukrainian literature in Canada, says Pawliw, is the tendency of scholars to deal with literary topics or problems which are banned altogether or presented with distortions in the USSR. In his concluding remarks Pawliw makes the following statement: "Although studies of Ukrainian literature in Canada appear to have all the characteristics of an adequately developed activity and the writings portray a variety of accepted forms, these studies none the less remain in general, the work of a small group of individuals. We cannot speak, as yet, of separate associations, schools, or groups with strictly defined creative tendencies and planned styles of literary criticism."

A1140. Pazuniak, Natalia. "Lesya Ukrainka - Ukraine's greatest poetess." / Natalia I. Pazuniak. Ukrainian Quarterly. 27.3 (Autumn 1971): 237- 252.

An article on the occasion of Lesia Ukrainka's one hundredth birth anniversary. The author provides a biography of Lesia Ukrainka, describes the cultural environment in which she grew up, and then proceeds to analyze one by one all the important works of the poet and playwright. Lesia Ukrainka's works, in Pazuniak's view, are "truly universal" and the reason they are not well known in the West is "due mainly to the political situation of Ukraine, which has been treated constantly as a part of the Russian 'milieu'." See also the off-print of this article [cf. B068].

A1141. "Pchilka, Olena (pen name of Ol'ga Petrovna Kosach, née Dragomanova)." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 21 (1978): 185. Biblio.

Ol'ha Drahomanova-Kosach (1849-1930) who wrote under the pseudonym Olena Pchilka, is characterized here as "Ukrainian writer, journalist and ethnographer". "Pchilka at first supported liberal cultural ideas but later often expressed bourgeois nationalistic views, especially in her articles and literary criticism..." says this GSE entry of 18 lines.

A1142. "Pchilka, Olena (real name: Kosach, Ol'ga Petrovna)." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 439.

Bio-bibliographical data (16 lines) about Olena Pchilka (b. 17 July 1849, d.4 October 1930).

A1143. Pelenski, Jaroslaw. "Recent Ukrainian writing." Survey. 59 (April 1966): 102-112.

Pelenski discusses the work of the writers of the 1960's (the so called shestydesiatnyky) who, in his words, "have moved away from the dogmas of socialist realism and have brought a fresh approach into the literary life of the Soviet Ukraine, unknown since the thirties." He stresses the characteristics they have in common, such as their emphasis on "free creativity, truthful description of life, imaginative observation of nature, and a critical attitude towards those public personalities who, for one reason or another, paid their homage to the 'cult of personality'..." as well as their "curiously strong commitment to the destiny (dolya) of their country and to its history." Some parallels are made between the Ukrainian shestydesiatnyky and the young Russian poets of the time. Pelenski singles out the poetry of Kostenko, Drach, Korotych, Vinhranovs'kyi and Symonenko and the prose of Hutsalo and Drozd. In addition, he provides some data on adverse reaction of Soviet critics to some recent work of such older writers as Sava Holovanivs'kyi and Leonid Pervomais'kyi (both of Jewish origin) and cites the case of a 20-year old poet V. Holoborod'ko whose poetry he characterizes as "strictly non-political and non-intellectual", "permeated with a kind of animism which may be understood as a protest against our technological civilisation and its rationalist extremes" as a possible harbinger of things to come in the future. The author's arguments are illustrated with some literal line-by-line prose translations of poetry, the longer fragments of which are the following: There are all kinds of batons / Lina Kostenko (13 lines, p.104). And one shouldn't drown / Vitaly Korotych (8 lines, p.105). You've brought my people to my heart / M. Vinhranovs'kyi [Vinhranovsky] (8 lines, p.106). We are Ukrainian sparrows / I. Drach (18 lines, p.106-107). Because of you I plant pearls in human souls / V. Symonenko (8 lines, p.107). The Head (The head was already rolling) / V. Holoborodko (9 lines, p.111). God (...And God came to him and scattered) / I. Drach (15 lines, p.111).

A1144. Pelensky, Irene. "The Ukrainian studies of Yevhen Pelens'ky." Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Centennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 275.

English summary of a Ukrainian article printed on pp.112-115. The article is a bio- bibliographical survey of the author's late husband, Ievhen Pelens'kyi (1908-1956), a Ukrainian literary historian and bibliographer.

A1145. Perejda, George John. "Beowulf and Slovo o polku Igoreve: a study of parallels and relations in structure, themes and imagery." Dissertation Abstracts International. 34.7 (January 1974): 4214-A.

An abstract of a PhD. dissertation at the University of Detroit (1973). The author attempts to find thematic and structural parallels between the old English poem Beowulf and Slovo o polku Ihorevim. Similarities, according to Perejda, "can be explained in part by a reference to a common Scandinavian heritage." "It is the pictures of death and funeral rites - of death sleds going down to the sea, of women keening at the water's edge - that establish the relation between the spirit of Beowulf and Slovo and the body of literary work from the north. The figurative parallels are illustrated especially in the use of battle imagery, where the sounds of the very words in each poem echo each other." The dissertation, 276 p.long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfims International, order no. 73-31, 303.

A1146. "Peretts, Vladimir Nikolaevich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 19 (1978): 421. Biblio.

Volodymyr Perets (1870-1935), says GSE, was a "Soviet literary critic" whose works "deal with general problem of literary criticism, the interrelations between literature and folklore, the connections between Russian and Ukrainian literatures, and the history of the folk theater in the 17th and 18th centuries". (10 lines).

A1147. "Peretts, Vladimir Nikolayevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 441.

Thirty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about Volodymyr Perets, the literary historian, specialist in Ukrainian and Russian literature (b. 31 January 1870, d.24 September 1935).

A1148. Perfecky, George A. "Studies on the Galician Volynian (Volhynian) Chronicle." Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 12.1-2 (33-34) (1969-1972): 62-112.

Halyts'ko-volyns'kyi litopys, the Galician-Volynian Chronicle, says Perfecky, "has the dubious distinction of being the most highly ornamented and most poetic of the early Eastern Slavic chronicles and at the same time the least studied from the linguistic point of view." The author provides a critical bibliographical survey of linguistic studies of the Chronicle discussing such topics as authorship and composition, chronology, the bias in the Chronicle, its language, phonology, morphology, syntax.

A1149. Pervomais'kyi, Leonid. "Some random notes (On writing and writers)." / Leonid Pervomaisky. Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 4(265) (1970): 153-157.

An editorial note identifies the author as "the eminent Ukrainian poet and writer". A selection of brief notes and anecdotes expressing Pervomais'kyi's views on the art of writing, e.g.: "It's a long and far from easy task to forge oneself into a poet, that is, to subordinate one's natural abilities to a conscious will to create art. Only a few individuals succeed in finding themselves at once, most of us are doomed to prolonged quests that inescapably bring torment, defeats and disappointments in their train. In the last analysis all the people a writer portrays constitute a particle of his consciousness. The writer's ability to portray characters lies in the manifold strata of his notions, in his inner disposition to share the experiences of the world, not only of respectable characters, but of thorough rogues, too..." No source of the material is indicated.

A1150. "Pervomaysky (real name: Gurevich) Leonid Solomonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 476.

A bio-bibliographical note of 59 lines about the poet and novelist Leonid Pervomais'kyi (born 1908).

A1151. "Petition on behalf of Valentyn Moroz, Ukrainian political prisoner in the USSR." Ukrainian Quarterly. 30.4 (Winter 1974): 418.

The petition from the Ukrainian Congress Committee of America, signed by the executive board - Lev E. Dobriansky, President, et al. - is addressed to Marc Schreiber, Director, Division of Human Rights, United Nations, and dated 8 October 1974.

A1152. Picchio, Riccardo. "The Holy Scriptures and the Igor' Tale." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974-1975. 5 (1974-1975): 20-22. Biblio.

A summary of the paper presented by Riccardo Picchio, professor of Yale University, at a general seminar on 31 October 1974, and of the discussion that followed. The "moral of the story" in Slovo o polku Ihorevim, according to Picchio as reported in the Minutes, "is readily discernible if this work is read in the light of Biblical references dealing with the 'sin of pride'. The hybris of Igor Svjatoslavič is a leitmotif in the Igor Tale that make this work an exemplum in a spirit most typical of the medieval Christian tradition."

A1153. Picchio, Riccardo. "Notes on the text of the Igor' Tale." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 2.4 (December 1978): 393-422.

A discussion of several controversial readings of the text of Slovo o polku Ihorevim and a proposal to subject this text to isocolic scanning. "What is important is to intestigate the text's texture by analyzing the distribution of its cola, that is its 'members' and 'segments'. In principle, it is no less useful to study the interconnections of hetero-cola than to study those of iso-cola. The presence of iso-colic structures in a text creates particularly favorable conditions for its analysis," says the author.

A1154. Picchio, Riccardo. "On the prosodic structure of the Igor Tale." Slavic and East European Journal. 16.2 (Summer 1972): 147-162. Notes.

The author reports on his research "into the prosodic principles which seem to govern a large body of Old Russian prose". He claims that his analysis of Slovo o polku Ihorevim does not imply "the absence of poetic structures in this controversial literary monument", but rather that scholars "are not in a position to assign Old Russian works to any precise rhetorical category". Picchio believes that "isocolic constructions are the most typical feature of Medieval Slavic prose" and that "a more accurate description of the rhetorical devices" is needed, because "the isocolic principle does not by itself allow us yet to separate prose from poetry."

A1155. "Pidsukha, Aleksandr Nikolaevich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 483.

Bio-bibliographical data about the poet and playwrigh Oleksandr Pidsukha (born 1918) (29 lines).

A1156. Pinczuk, Jaroslav R. "The concept of Rurbanism in Pidmohyl'nyi's Misto." Studia Ucrainica. 1 (1978): 129- 132.

The focus of Valeriian Pidmohyl'nyi's novel Misto, according to Pinczuk, is "on the psychological, cultural and socio-economic changes generated by the integration of rural and urban life-styles in Ukraine in the 1920's." Three years before the publication of Misto, the Czech sociologist Arn Blaha proposed a theory which he called "Rurbanism". Blaha argued, says Pinczuk, that the best aspects of both rural and urban life are needed "to create a more efficient and functional alternative which would be nutually acceptable by both sides." In Pinczuk's view, Radchenko, the hero of Pidmohyl'nyi's novel, follows the standard Rurbanistic formula, but discovers a considerable gap between the noble theory and the practice of gross inequalities.

A1157. Pines, Paul . "Hearing with the eyes, seeing with the ears: the sublunar life of Bohdan Ihor Antonych." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 3.1 (Spring 1978): 85-90.

Paul Pines is an American poet, author of poetry collections Onions and Keeping of time. This essay conveys his impressions from the first meeting with Antonych's poetry in the book of English translations entitled Square of Angels [cf. B001]. Says Pines about Antonych: "He is closer to the moonstruck Lorca than the cold-eyed Yeats and, like the Andalusian, saturates his landscapes with sublunar light like an x-ray." Antonych, according to Pines, "makes us hear his images", "Antonych can give us the vowel in the colour so that, hardly knowing it, we are looking at grass and hearing whole fields of green. He gives us shapes, the laws that govern physical properties, like notes and timbres." Among brief poetry quotations are two last stanzas from Antonych's poem Ploshcha ianholiv. The Ukrainian version of Pine's essay was published in the journal Suchasnist (July-August 1978): 58-63.

A1158. Pivtoradni, Vasyl. "A moment which is passing into nonexistence. Concerning the collection and study of the biographies of Ukrainian writers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 20-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (3 February 1970): 3].

Pivtoradni provides a list of 41 writers from the Leites/Iashek bibliography covering ten years of Ukrainian literature and published in 1928. These 41 names, according to Pivtoradni, are not covered in Soviet Ukrainian encyclopedias and dictionaries, and are absent from the five- volume bio-bibliographical dictionary of Ukrainian writers published in 1960-1965. Digest's title: "Complains about lack of biographic data on many 20s-30s authors."

A1159. Plachynda, Serhii. "Away with you, black shadows" / Serhiy Plachynda. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 14-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 August 1976): 4].

Plachynda rebuffs M.Prokop's article in the emigré journal Suchasnist' about what Prokop calls "the most suffering class in the USSR" - the collective farms peasantry - and expresses his "anger and indignation" about an article in another emigré journal, Vyzvol'nyi shliakh, by Ya. Vil'shenko, in which he, Plachynda, is described as a victim of "Moscow terror" who lives under the threat of "imminent imprisonment". Plachynda speaks of his new book Stepova khata about to be issued by Radians'kyi pys'mennyk publishing house, of his current project - a documentary novel about Dovzhenko, of his regrets about his previous book Neopalyma kupyna, which he now finds "idealized, deprived of many real human, class and historical features", and of his children: two daughters and one son - all presently students in Ukrainian schools and universities. The Digest's title: "Plachynda spurns Western 'anxiety' on his behalf."

A1160. Plachynda, Serhii. "A poet of the silver screen" / Serhiy Plachinda. Dedicated to the 80th birth anniversary of Olexandr Dovzhenko. Ukrainian Canadian. 27.574 (67) (November 1974): 21-23. illus., port.

About Dovzhenko's films and their reception in Western Europe. Illustrated with Dovzhenko's portrait on p.21 and three photos from his films Zemlia, Shchors and Arsenal.

A1161. Plakhotniuk, Mykola. "Truth is on our side (A reply to the slanderers)." Ukrainian Review (London). 18.4 (Winter 1971): 56-61.

An article reprinted in translation from Ukrains'kyi visnyk (no.2, May 1970) - an underground journal in Ukraine. The article reports on the trial in Dnipropetrovsk in January 1970 of Ivan Sokul's'kyi, Mykola Kul'chyns'kyi and Viktor Savchenko. The first two, who were sentenced to 4 1/2 and 2 1/2 years of imprisonment respectively, are characterized as "young poets". The article attempts to disprove the accusations against the three. A note at the end says "To be concluded", but no such conclusion was found in the subsequent issues of the Ukrainian Review.

A1162. "Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.5 (May 1972): 10. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (21 March 1972): 1].

The Digest's title: "Writers' Union holds plenum on youth in literature". A report on the Second plenum of writers which began, apparently, on the 20 of March and whose main topic was the work with young writers. Party and Komsomol officials took part, including guests from Moscow, in addition to Ukrainian writers and journalists. V. Kozachenko, B. Buriak [Buryak], A. Katsnelson and I. Zub delivered reports. The morning session was presided over by P. Zahrebel'nyi.

A1163. "Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 8. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (14 February 1975): 1].

The Sixth Plenum was held on 12 February in Kyiv and was opened by the first secretary V. Kozachenko. A report on the printed organs of the Union of Writers of Ukraine was delivered by O. Levada. Editors of Dnipro, Vitchyzna, Donbas, Prapor, Zhovten, Raduga, Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo, Literaturna Ukraina participated in the discussion which followed. The Digest's title: "Levada discusses literary periodicals."

A1164. "Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 27. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 April 1976): 2].

The Plenum elected V.P. Kozachenko first secretary of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine; P. Zahrebel'nyi, Iu.Zbanats'kyi, O.S. Levada and B.I. Oliinyk [Oliynyk in text] were elected secretaries, P. Shabatun was elected secretary in charge of organizational matters. Thirty-three writers were elected to the Presidium of the Executive Board. The Digest's title: "Kozachenko re-elected first secretary of Writers Union".

A1165. "Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 [sic, i.e.5] (May 1977): 11-12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (18 March 1977): 1].

The Plenum began on 17 March. V.P. Kozachenko delivered a report about the work with young writers [cf. A748]; B.I. Oliinyk spoke about the "civic spirit of Soviet Ukrainian poetry" [cf. A1078]. The Digest's title: "Ukrainian Writers' Union Executive Board holds plenum."

A1166. Pliushch, Leonid. "The horrors of psychiatric prisons" / Leonid Plyushch. Ukrainian Review (London). 21 [i.e.22].4 (Winter 1975): 66-72.

Excerpts from statements made at the press conference in Paris on February 3, 1976. [sic, i.e.1975].

A1167. Podolyan, Mykola. "In the role of a beggar." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.8 (August 1973): 33-36. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 July 1973): 4].

A letter by the employees of the Kyiv customs to the newspaper Radians'ka Ukraina complained of Soviet citizens receiving aid packages from abroad. Podolyan relates this in his article, singling out for his special attention the aid packages sent by Oleksa Horbach (Aleksa in the article) from West Germany to the writer Borys Antonenko-Davydovych, residing in Soviet Ukraine. Horbach is called a "Doctor of fascism", Antonenko-Davydovych - "a professional beggar", "a writer who accepts pittance from the enemy camp, and the philantropic operation is described as a dangerous procedure with sinister political implications. The Digest's title: "Antonenko-Davydovych attacked for 'begging' from the West."

A1168. "Poet Melnychuk sentenced to three years at hard labor." Ukrainian Quarterly. 29.3 (Autumn 1973): 336.

According to this note in the "Chronicle of current events", Taras Mel'nychuk was sentenced in the Spring of 1972 to three years of hard labor for distributing "anti-Soviet" literature.

A1169. "Poetic snowstorm. Press review." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.3 (March 1967): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina. (8 February 1967): 2].

An unsigned response to the poetry selections published recently by the journals Literaturna Ukraina and Molod' Ukrainy. The anonymous author says that "the young poets have good writing techniques, but their outlook on life is somewhat narrow, a strictly personal one" and he singles out Vasyl Kolodii [Kolodiy], Iryna Zhylenko and Valentyn Moroz for poetry "devoid of deep meaning and any social significance" and "the absence of significant thoughts". The Digest supplied title reads: "Party organ fires a shot at young poets."

A1170. Pogorelskin, Alexis E. "N.I. Kostomarov and the origins of the Vestnik Evropy circle." Oxford Slavonic Papers. n.s. 11 (1978): 84- 100.

Pogorelskin describes the intellectual climate in St. Petersburg in the early 1860's and the milieu of scholars at the University of St. Petersburg which included M.M. Stasyulevich, member of historical-philological faculty, K.D. Kavelin and V.D. Spasovich, both from the faculty of law, and Mykola Kostomarov, professor of Russian history. This was a period of student demonstrations and conflicts between the university and the government; as a consequence some of the professors resigned and the university was subject to periodical closures. In order to find an outlet for scholarly work, Stasyulevich and Spasovich established in 1866 "a journal devoted to historical-political scholarship" Vestnik Evropy. In Pogorelskin's view, it was Kostomarov who "was responsible for the initial success of Vestnik Evropy..." and "An account of Kostomarov's association with those who did bear responsibility for the journal is essential for the understanding of its consistency and its regular appearance over more than fifty years."

A1171. Pohorilyi, Semen. "The unpublished novels of Volodymyr Vynnychenko." / Semen Pohorilyj. Dissertation Abstracts International. 32.9 (March 1972): 5241-A.

An abstract of a 1971 PhD. dissertation at the New York University. The author provides an analysis of four unpublished Vynnychenko novels, i.e. "Poklady zolota" (Deposits of Gold), "Vichnyi imperatyv" (The Eternal Imperative), "Leprozorii" (Hospital for Lepers) and "Slovo za toboiu, Staline!" (Now it's your turn, Stalin!) The dissertation, according to this abstract, focuses on the thematic, stylistic and structural peculiarities of these unpublished novels, but it also makes frequent references to Vynnychenko's earlier works and his unpublished diary deposited at the Columbia University Library. All four novels, says Pohorilyi, develop the same themes and ideas that Vynnychynko presented in his "science fiction" novel Soniashna mashyna (The Sun Machine), i.e. "the themes of human happiness or lack of it, humanism, the search for one's paradise amid chaos and insurmountable obstacles". This 255 p. long dissertation is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no. 72-3115, but the text is in Russian.

A1172. Pohrebennyk, Fedir. "Vagilevich, Ivan Nikolaevich." / F.P. Pogrebennik. Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 4 (1974): 464-465. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 19 lines about Ivan Vahylevych (1811-1866), characterized here as "Ukrainian writer, scholar, philologist and folklorist."

A1173. Pohribnyi, Anatolii. "The first Ukrainian novel" / A. Pohrebny. Ukrainian Canadian. 22.509 (3) (January 1969): 22.

The first prose writer in Ukrainian literature, according to Pohribnyi, was not Kvitka- Osnovianenko, whose "A soldier's portrait" was published in 1833, but Mykola Venger, whose novel entitled "Mykola Koval" was published in Mykolaiv a year earlier. Venger's work, whose subtitle read "Contemporary novel of Little Russia", was written, says Pohribnyi, "in direct response to the Polish uprising of 1830-1831 and was directed against the oppressive policy of Russian tsarism". According to Pohribnyi, it was one of the first works written in the Ukrainian language, but unfortunately, very little is known about its author.

A1174. "Political prisoners talk about themselves: conversations with Svitlychny, Kandyba, Kalynets, Pryshliak, Antoniuk and others." ABN Correspondence. 26.5 (September-October 1975): 27-31.

A report based on a samvydav document currently circulated in the USSR, that consists of interviews with a group of Ukrainian and Jewish prisoners in the Perm concentration camp, late in 1974. Among those interviewed were Ukrainian writers Ivan Svitlychnyi and Ihor Kalynets'. They speak about the isolation in which they are kept, the attempt to keep secret the true reasons for their incarceration and the inhuman conditions in the camps. Says Kalynets': "I was sentenced... for my literary works which were not anti-Soviet in any way whatsoever, nor even did they have a socio-political character." Says Svitlychnyi: "my main object in life was my philological work, and not 'politics'"... but even before imprisonment, "my literary works, which in no way were anti-Soviet, were not published solely because my surname was not in favour with the official circles, and up to the time of my arrest I was in fact treated as an outlaw."

A1175. Polotai, A.M. "Skliarenko, Semen Dmitrievich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 23 (1979): 506. Biblio.

A bio-bibliographical note of 26 lines about the novelist and short story writer Semen Skliarenko (1901-1962).

A1176. "Poltoratsky, Aleksey Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 492.

Thirty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer, publicist and literary critic Oleksii Poltorats'kyi (born 1905).

A1177. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "A magazine promoting understanding among nations." / Alexei Poltoratsky. Soviet Literature. 8 (281) (1971): 178-181.

About Vsesvit, the Ukrainian journal published by the Writers' Union of Ukraine and the Ukrainian Society for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries. "In creating Vsesvit our writers and other workers in the sphere of culture wanted to use all possible literary media to inform Ukrainian readers about life in other countries," says Poltorats'kyi, Vsesvit's editor. "Naturally we feel greatest affinity with the work of those writers who have the same ideological standpoint as ourselves and are striving to master the infinitely diverse method of socialist realism which implies full freedom of individual creative style. But our natural sympathies for our literary comrades-in-arms do not restrict us in our choice of works. As Lenin said in his articles on Leo Tolstoy, any gifted writer, by virtue of his own talent, must inevitably reveal some essential aspects of the life he is writing about." Vsesvit, at the time of this article's writing, was in its 13th year of publication.

A1178. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "One hundred numbers." / Oleksiy Poltorats'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.12 (December 1966): 17- 19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vsesvit. 10 (October 1966): 134-139].

Poltorats'kyi, the editor of Vsesvit, surveys the journal's accomplishment on the occasion of the publication of the 100th issue. According to Poltorats'kyi, works of 530 writers from 78 countries have been published in this Ukrainian journal of foreign literature. He admits that, "The bulk of works which have appeared on the pages of our journal belong to the realistic school of writing..." The Digest's title: "Editor looks back on 100 issues of Vsesvit."

A1179. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "Under the strain of the ideological duel." / Oleksiy Poltorats'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (20 January 1970): 3].

A report about the journal Vsesvit by its editor to the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine. Vsesvit, as a rule, does not publish translations already available in Russian, says Poltorats'kyi and defends this policy which, in his opinion, "is not a question of principle but of expedience". One exception was made to this policy - Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls - because the Russian edition was difficult to obtain, says Poltorats'kyi. According to the author: "We printed 65,000 copies of this issue and we were informed that this issue was sold out from the bookstands in one day." Despite this experience, Poltorats'kyi insists that "In the future we will continue to print what has not been published in Russian." Poltorats'kyi dismisses as unfounded the claim of the emigré journal Suchasnist' that in Vsesvit works are chosen not for their literary merit, but for propaganda purposes. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Poltoratskyy defends VSESVIT selection policies."

A1180. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "Vsesvit means the whole world." / Alexei Poltoratsky. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 184-185.

The editor of Vsesvit, the Ukrainian journal devoted solely to foreign literature, discusses the journal's growth (from a circulation of 7,000 to 51,000 in it's tenth year of existence), editorial criteria for the selection of works to be published, the competition and collaboration with the Russian, Moscow based journal devoted to foreign literature. Says Poltorats'kyi: "We are mostly interested in realist literature with its objective portrayal of the modern world, the life of its peoples and their lofty ideals... Vsesvit endeavors to throw light on the struggle of socialist and critical realism with various brands of modernism and supermodernism..."

A1181. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "We continue our discussion."/ Ol. Poltorats'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.7 (July 1967): 15-18. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Vsesvit. 5 (May 1967): 140-144.]

The Digest's supplied title reads: "'Vsesvit' editor answers readers' requests." Poltorats'kyi reviews readers' requests indicated on a Vsesvit questionaire, and provides some explanations and comments on the editorial policy. Among the topics discussed are the publication of excerpts of James Joyce's Ulysses, the pros and con's of publishing translations available also in Russian, of publication of translations of classic writers versus the need to translate contemporary world literature, etc.

A1182. Poltorats'kyi, Oleksii. "Whom are certain humanists defending?" / Oleksiy Poltorats'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.9 (September 1968): 17-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 July 1968): 2].

Poltorats'kyi finds "truly perplexing" what he calls "the behavior of certain Soviet literary people and scientific workers who have seen fit to sign letters defending red-handed ideological diversionists." The signatories of defense letters are unnamed. The "ideological diversionists" named by Poltorats'kyi are V. Chornovil and S. Karavans'kyi. The article provides some details about Chornovil's Lykho z rozumu, published in Paris in 1967, and about the activities of S. Karavans'kyi, a long time political prisoner and one-time literary translator who is characterized by the author as "a nationalist spy". The Digest supplied title reads: "Writer hits colleagues for aid to prisoners." See also A1476.

A1183. Pomorska, Krystyna. "Observations on Ukrainian erotic folk songs." / Krystyna Pomorska-Jakobson. Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. 4 (1973-1974): 73- 74. Biblio.

A summary of the paper presented on 19 April 1974 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker analyzed four Ukrainian folk songs disclosing "the figurative character of various elements in the songs' structure" and pointing out "where their fundamental devices are laid bare, and thus elucidate the makeup of the texts."

A1184. Pomorska, Krystyna. "Observations on Ukrainian erotic folk songs." Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.1 (March 1977): 115-129.

According to Pomorska, "basic parallelism in folklore represents a fixed inner symbolic pattern." She examines the symbolic pattern in four Ukrainian folk songs: Kopav, kopav kirnychenku, nedilen'ku, dvi; Oi na hori zhentsi zhnut'; Rozpriahaite, khloptsi, koni and Zakuvala zozulen'la na khati - na rozi, hei. The author examines the song about Sahaidachnyi (Oi na hori zhentsi zhnut') which, in her view, "illustrates related but more general phenomena", and claims that in the other three songs drinking water or giving water to a horse stands for the sexual act, while digging a well symbolizes the act of courtship or flirtation. Pp.126-129 contain literal English translations by the author of the folk songs analyzed in the article, i.e. I dug, I dug a well one week, two weeks (17 lines), There, on the mountain, the harvesters are harvesting (35 lines), Unharness your horses, boys (24 lines) and A cuckoo cried out on the hut - on the corner (10 lines).

A1185. Ponomariov, Petro. "In good time."/ Petro Ponomaryov. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.12 (December 1975): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (31 October 1975): 1].

Ponomariov reports on new books published during the past Five-year Plan in Donbas - most of them in Russian.

A1186. Poppe, Richard Warren. "The literary history of the Kievan Caves Patericon up to 1500." Dissertation Abstracts International. 33.10 (April 1973): 5689-A - 5690-A.

An abstract of a 1970 PhD. dissertation at Columbia University. Kyievo-Pechers'kyi Pateryk, says the author, "took shape gradually over the centuries and was continually being reworked and reshaped. The various redactors (especially Kassian) not only modernized the language of the text at hand but also strove to improve upon and elevate the style according to the norms of the times". "On the basis of first hand study of the manuscript materials" Pope attempts to establish "relationships between the various redactions" by "comparative linguistic analysis" and "textological study of the contents of the various redactions." The dissertation, 395 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no.73-8975.

A1187. Poppe, Richard W.F. "On the comparative literary analysis of the Patericon story (translated and original) in the Pre-Mongol period." Canadian Contributions to the VIII International Congress of Slavists. (Zagreb-Ljubljana, 1978). Tradition and Innovation in Slavic Literatures, Linguistics and Stylistics. Ed. by Z. Folejewski and E.Heier, G. Luckyj, G. Schaarschmidt. Ottawa: Canadian Association of Slavists, 1978. 1- 23. Biblio. notes 18-23.

An analysis and comparison of the medieval story about a seductress and a pious monk which appears as a Byzantine story translated from Latin in Skete Patericon (Skitskii poglavnyj pateryk) and the Kyivan Caves Patericon in its original East Slavic version entitled "Tale of Moses the Hungarian" written by the monk Polikarp. Poppe considers the "Tale of Moses the Hungarian" "a work of imaginative fiction" in which the literary interest is in the foreground and "the entertainment element... is given greater significance".

A1188. Povazhna, Valentyna. "An honorably travelled road." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 10-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 November 1968): 1-2].

A critical article about Ivan Nechui-Levyts'kyi on the occasion of the 130th anniversary of his birth. Povazhna speaks about the "various inconsistencies" in the writer's world view. He was, she claims, thoroughly familiar with the best writers of Russian literature, but in an article published in 1878 "Siohochasne literaturne priamuvannia" "he affirmed the 'uselessness' of Russian literature for the development of Ukrainian literature". This view of Nechui's, according to Povazhna's interpretation, "was based solely upon the attitude of Russia's reactionary circles toward Ukrainian culture, and not upon that of its leaders who defended Ukrainian literature both from Valuyev's circular of 1863 and the notorious Emsk [sic] Edict of 1876." Povazhna characterizes Nechui as well educated, tranquil and well-balanced, with a sense of humor, an active participant in the literary and socio-political issues of his day. He attempted, says Povazhna, to "establish an objective narrative style which could reveal the remarkably complex cause and effect relations between man and society, and which could portray, more thoroughly and profoundly, man and his inner world..." The Digest's title: "On the 130th anniversary of Nechuy-Levytsky's birth".

A1189. "Prapor." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 20 (1979): 503.

According to GSE, Prapor is "a monthly literary, artistic and sociopolitical journal", published in Kharkiv since 1956. Its circulation in 1975 is given as 14,000. (10 lines).

A1190. "The principle hero in literature; critics discuss works expounding the worker theme." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.12 (December 1973): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (26 October 1973): 2].

About a recent meeting of the criticism commission of the Writers Union, held under the chairmanship of Leonid Novychenko. Mykola Zhulyns'kyi, who was the main speaker, reviewed books on the worker theme published in the last two years, such as Lykhobor by V. Sobko, Kanal by I. Hryhurko, Z pohliadu vichnosti and Perekhodymo do liubovi by P. Zahrebel'nyi, Dovha-dovha khvylyna by A. Moroz, Zhyva voda z kamenia by V. Maniak and Blakyt' by Iu. Bedzyk. O. Syzonenko, in a co-report, spoke about his own book Karabely. Participating in the discussion were Iu. Pokal'chuk, P. Zahrebel'nyi, P. Orovets'kyi and S. Kryzhanivs'kyi. The Digest's title: "Writers' criticism commission discusses worker theme in literature".

A1191. "Prisoners of conscience about themselves: V. Stus." Ukrainian Review (London). 21 [i.e.22].4 (Winter 1975): 38-49.

Contains the following documents smuggled out to the West: I accuse: Accusation of Soviet state by Ukrainian political prisoner, V. Stus. The verdict [an abridged text of the 7 September 1972 verdict against Stus]. Stus's "My comment on the verdict". V. Stus in defence of V. Chornovil [declaration dated 3 March 1975] and "Short biography of Vasyl Stus" [an editorial comment].

A1192. Pritsak, Omeljan. "Dmytro Čyževs'kyj. In memoriam (23 March 1894 - 18 April 1977)." / Omeljan Pritsak, Ihor Ševčenko. Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.3 (September 1977): 379-397, 398-406.

This obituary article characterizes Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi as "one of the most universal Slavic scholars and the leading authority on Ukrainian literature and philology" whose "towering personality had dominated all the major aspects of Slavic studies..." The article discusses Chyzhevs'kyi's biography and presents a critical overview of his work. Pp.398-406 contain an Addendum: Chyzhevs'kyi's own autobiography, written in German probably around 1945, and supplied to the authors of this obituary by the deceased scholar's wife.

A1193. Pritsak, Omeljan. "The 'External history' of the texts of the Hypatian Chronicles." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1972-1973. 3 (1972-1973): 14-20. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read and the discussion that followed at the seminar held on 26 October 1972. The speaker discussed the few extant collections (zbirnyky) containing the text of the Hypatian Chronicle and attempted to answer questions as to when, for whom, and why they were copied and how they finally came to rest in St. Petersburg (Leningrad) and Cracow.

A1194. Pritsak, Omeljan. "The Igor Tale as a historical document." Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 12.1-2 (33-34) (1969-1972): 44-61. Biblio. 60-61.

Using the method of internal textual analysis of the Slovo o polku Ihorevim, Omeljan Pritsak attempts to determine its date of origin. Says Pritsak at the beginning of his paper: "... I wish to strongly emphasize that my position in the dispute over the authenticity of the Igor Tale is one of complete neutrality. To me it makes no difference whether the work originated in the 12th, the 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th or the 18th century. The important thing is to prove beyond any doubt its belonging to a given century". Using historical sources, the Hypatian and Laurentian chronicles, Pritsak places the events described in the Slovo in a historical context. He concludes that for the anonymous author of the Slovo the basic source was "the revised version of the Chernigov chronicle (Hypathian Chronicle), written not earlier than 1199" and "that the Igor Tale was written between the years 1199 and 1201, and taking into consideration the contents of the apostrophe to Roman - it is possible to limit the date of completion of Igor' Tale to the period between March and August of 1201." A footnote to the paper on p.59 says: "Moreover, the Igor 'Tale is not a historical chronicle, but a literary work. Therefore, its author, as all poets throughout the ages, addresses himself to the living, the dead, and the unborn."

A1195. Pritsak, Omeljan. "The literary cooperation of Jews in Kievan Rus'." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2( 1971-1972): 43-45. Biblio.

Summary of the paper read on 27 January 1972 and of the discussion that followed. Slavic literature of the Old Kyivan Rus', according to the speaker, can be divided into two periods: the early period prior to the 12th century was distinguished by its broad scope, religious tolerance, well-done translations from foreign languages, Greek and Hebrew. The second period - after the 12th century - was intolerant and typical of the Greek-Orthodox. Only in the second half of the 11th century were translations made from Hebrew into Slavic. Jews in Bohemia and Rus' used the Slavic language at least until the 13th century.

A1196. Pritsak, Omeljan. "Orest Zilyns'kyj. In memoriam (12 April 1923 - 16 July 1976)." / Omeljan Pritsak, Ihor Ševčenko. Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 1.2 (June 1977): 262-267.

An obituary article of the Ukrainian linguist and literary scholar who lived and worked in Czechoslovakia. Zilyns'kyi, according to this article, was the author of some 206 books, articles, textbooks, reviews and translations.

A1197. "Prof[essor] Constantine Bida." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 221.

A brief obituary notice in the "Chronicle of current events" about the Slavic scholar born in Lviv on 24 September 1916 who died in Ottawa on 11 April 1979 at the age of 62.

A1198. "Prof[essor] Dmytro Chyzhevsky ." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.3 (Autumn 1977): 331-332.

A 25-line note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the death of Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi, the renown Slavic scholar and historian of Ukrainian literature. The date of birth is given as 1894 in Aleksandria, Ukraine; the date of death as 17 April 1977 in Heidelberg, Germany.

A1199. "Prof[essor] Dmytro Chyzhevsky, literary experts [sic] dies." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.2 (Summer 1977): 96.

An unsigned obituary of Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi, who died on 18 April 1977 in Heidelberg, Germany, at the age of 83.

A1200. "Prof[essor] Mykhailo Rudnytsky." Ukrainian Quarterly. 31.1 (Spring 1975): 115-116.

A thirty-line obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events" about the literary scholar Mykhailo Rudnyts'kyi, born on 7 January 1889, who died in Ukraine in early February 1975.

A1201. "Progressing in all spheres." A talk with Yuri Smolich, chairman of the Board of the Ukrainian Writers' Union. Tr. by Hilda Perham. Soviet Literature. 10 (295) (1972): 132-136.

The interview with Iurii Smolych by the editors of Soviet Literature was conducted on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Soviet Union. In answering the interviewer's questions, Smolych discusses the progress made in Ukrainian literature since the prohibition of Ukrainian publications by the tsarist minister Valuev ("...we write and read books in our native Ukrainian language, which before the revolution was semi-legal") and makes personal observations about such things as the "diversity of individualities and styles" in current Ukrainian literature, the nationalist criticisms from abroad, and his writing of memoirs. Says Smolych: "...I came to understand clearly that the fight for national emancipation is genuine only when it is indivisible from the struggle for social emancipation." In his view, there is a noticeable "broadening of the aesthetic horizon of our national culture," because "We have said goodbye for good to the ethnographism which is indicative not so much of national originality as of backwardness and primitivism of artistic forms."

A1202. Prokop, Peter. "Monument to Wasyl Stefanyk." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.535 (56) (May 1971): 22-24. illus., port.

About a festival of songs, music and dance in Edmonton, that was meant to be a celebration of Vasyl Stefanyk's 100th birth anniversary and included the unveiling of a bust of Stefanyk sent to Canada as a gift from the Ukraina society. The bust is the work of the sculptor Volodymyr Skolozdra and is clearly visible among the illustrations.

A1203. Prokopiw, Orysia. " Olena Teliha." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.1 (Spring 1973): 57-67.

A discussion of the life, poetry and style of Olena Teliha interspersed with brief fragments of Teliha's poetry in translation. Teliha's "lyrics are unique in that they represent a fusion of two loves - the patriotic and the personal," says Prokopiw. Teliha's poetry, according to the author, "is saturated with the theme of life. Life to her is in constant, dynamic motion, full of mysticism and awakening, filled with colours and contrasts." What Prokopiw finds most interesting and vital in Teliha's work is "her concept of Women's Liberation", "ingenious blending of femininity and masculinity in the poetic form." The longest among the fragments of Teliha's poetry in translation included in this article is "Evening Song (Beyond the panes day is cooling)" - 24 lines, on pp.63-64 [i.e. a translation of "Vechirnia pisnia"].

A1204. Pronko, Jerry. "Valentyn Moroz in freedom." Forum. 42 (Summer 1979): 17. port.

Valentyn Moroz, the poet-historian and Soviet political prisoner, was freed through a Soviet- American prisoner exchange on 28 April 1979. The article reports on this international exchange and on Moroz's first days in the USA, especially his participation in a rally organized on his behalf in Philadelphia, and later in the St. Thomas Day memorial celebrations at the Ukrainian Orthodox cemetery at South Bound Brook, N.J. With Moroz's b/w portrait.

A1205. "Propose honorary U.S. citizenship for Valentyn Moroz." Ukrainian Quarterly. 32.3 (Autumn 1976): 322.

According to this note in the "Chronicle of current events", a resolution was introduced in the House of Representatives of the U.S. Congress authorizing the President to declare honorary U.S. citizenship for Valentyn Moroz, currently a political prisoner in the USSR. The resolution was sponsored by Millicent Fenwick, Edward I. Koch, Christopher Dodd and co-sponsored by 66 other members of the House of Representatives.

A1206. Prykhod'ko, Mykola. "Stories of the Soviet Ukraine: a reflection of prose in Ukraine." / Nicholas A. Prychodko. Ukrainian Quarterly. 30.4 (Winter 1974): 395-400.

This article is, apparently, meant as a review article of Stories of the Soviet Ukraine published in Moscow in 1970 [cf. B096]. No bibliographical data on the publication, however, are provided, and even though a few of the individual stories are identified by title and discussed in some detail, none of the authors is mentioned by name in the article. Says Prykhod'ko: "Although for the most part these stories of Soviet Ukraine are rewearding [sic] in purely a literary sense, we must nonetheless ask ourselves how truly representative they are of the Ukrainian people. We must ask the question on the level of the politico-ethnographic purity of their representation. It is only on this level that Ukrainian prose can hope to secure for itself a valid representative standing in world literature."

A1207. "Publish books on Ukrainian literature." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.1 (Spring 1978): 109.

A brief note in the "Chronicle of current events" about two recent CIUS publications in Ukrainian: M. Zerov's lectures on the history of Ukrainian literature, and the VAPLITE collection, edited by G. S. N. Luckyj.

A1208. Pyanov, Volodymyr. "To the wreath of friendship." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.4 (April 1977): 18-19. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (15 February 1977): 4].

About Ukrainian translations from Romanian literature. Pyanov mentions a number of older Romanian writers whose works have been published in Ukrainian, among them M. Eminescu, M. Sadoveanu, Z.Stancu, L. Rebreanu, as well as a series of contemporary novelists and playwrights, whose plays are included in the repertoire of Ukrainian theaters. The Digest's title: "Rumanian [sic] works in Ukrainian translation."

A1209. Pylypiuk, Natalia. "Taras Ševčenko's Try lita and the problem of literary continuity." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1975-1976. 6 (1975-1976): 14- 16. Biblio.

Summary of a paper read on 16 October 1975 by Natalia Pylypiuk, Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature, Harvard University, and of the discussion that followed. According to this summary, the speaker questioned the notion of a "break" in Ukrainian literary tradition and claimed that Kotliarevs'kyi's Eneida, rather than signifying such a break, "is perhaps primarily the culmination of an older literary tradition." In Shevchenko's poetry, according to Pylypiuk, there are "genetic incitations" which are closely related to 17th and 18th century Ukrainian writers, particularly Samiilo Velychko. In this connection, the speaker discussed Iaroslav Dzyra's investigations of correspendences between Velychko's Chronicle and Shevchenko's poem Velykyi l'okh.

A1210. Pylypiuk, Natalia. "The transformation of images in Antonyč's poetry." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1973-1974. 4 (1973-1974): 12-13. Biblio.

A summary of the paper presented on October 25, 1974 by Natalia Pylypiuk, Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature, Harvard University, and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed the "recharging of traditional images" in the poetry of Bohdan Ihor Antonych which, in her view, is related directly to the poet's concept of art and to his original cosmogony.

A1211. Pylypiuk, Natalia. "Ukrainian prosody in Ševčenko's fourteen-syllable verse." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1974-1975. 5 (1974-1975): 17- 19. Biblio.

Summary of the paper presented on 24 October 1974 by Natalia Pylypiuk, a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature, Harvard University, and of the discussion that followed. According to this summary, the speaker took issue with the views of A.P. Shamrai and H. Sydorenko who substituted "a mythifying worship of folk prosody" for "the necessary understanding of prosody" and agreed with the studies of V. Kovalevs'kyi, claiming that Shevchenko's "innovations consisted of rediscovering the original rhythm of Ukrainian poetry."

A1212. Pyrih, Liubomyr. "A century of immortality" / Lyubomir Pyrih. Ukraine. 1(9) (1972): 15. illus.

About stamps and envelopes issued to honor famous Ukrainians. The illustrations include: a commemorative postage stamp honoring Lesia Ukrainka, envelopes with portraits of Stefanyk, Kryms'kyi, Hnatiuk. The article gives brief bio-bibliographical data on each of these.

A1213. Pyrih, Liubomyr. "Ivan Franko: Giant of thought." / Lyubomir Pirih. Ukraine. 4(40) (1979): 28. illus., part. col.

About postage stamps honoring Ivan Franko. The illustrations show three stamps issued by the USSR with Franko's portrait, one with Franko's portrait issued by Romania and two stamps depicting the Soviet ocean liner "Ivan Franko" - one issued by the USSR, one by the German Democratic Republic, (DDR).

A1214. Pyrih, Liubomyr. "Theater luminaries: Ukraine on postage stamps." / Lyubomir Pyrih. Ukraine. 1(17) (1974): 14-15. illus.

The article provides some data about Kotliarevs'kyi, Kropyvnyts'kyi, Karpenko-Karyi, M. Staryts'kyi, Mykola Sadovs'kyi, Semen Hulak-Artemovs'kyi and M. Lysenko and is illustrated with reproductions of postage stamps in honor of Kotliarevs'kyi, Kropyvnyts'kyi and Hulak- Artemovs'kyi, as well as b/w portraits of Hulak-Artemovs'kyi and Marko Kropyvnyts'kyi and a photo of the Kotliarevs'kyi monument in Poltava.

A1215. Pytlowany, Melanie. "Continuity and innovation in the poetry of the New York Group." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 2.1 (Spring 1977): 3-21.

The author surveys some articles on the New York Group of poets (by Iurii Shevelov, Bohdan Rubchak, Hryhorii Kostiuk, Emmanuil Rais) and provides her own critical comments on the poetry of Bohdan Boychuk, Iurii Tarnavskyi, Zhenia Vasylkivska, Patrytsiia Kylyna, Marco Carynnyk. Her conclusions pertaining to the whole group: "...since 1954 elements of innovation have indeed emerged in some of the poetry of some members of the New York Group of poets. It also appears that everyone, including the members themselves, now has a more realistic perception of their work: they can now see more elements of continuity in their own work flowing from literary predecessors within the scope of Ukrainian literature. The youthful zeal has mellowed into a more productive state which allows them to be more creative in their increasaed awareness. Certain illusions of being "new Columbuses" have faded." Poetry quotations in the article are all in the original Ukrainian.

A1216. "A quiz about Shevchenko." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.556 (49) (March 1973): 35. port.

Fourteen questions to test the young readers' knowledge about Taras Shevchenko.

A1217. Rachuk, Igor. "A message of courage." Soviet Film. 10 (137) (1968): 26-27. illus.

About the film "Unforgettable", based on the war stories of Oleksandr Dovzhenko. "In the stories he wrote so soon after the most dramatic months of the war with nazi Germany, Dovzhenko set himself a task that was honourable, but, one must admit, extremely courageous at that time, of analysing the feelings that swept over him as he reviewed those terrible scenes he had seen so often in the course of his own war service", says Rachuk.

A1218. "Radianske literaturoznavstvo." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 21 (1978): 393.

Described as "a Soviet journal devoted to the theory and history of literature and to literary criticism". The journal is published in Ukrainian, in Kyiv, since 1957. According to GSE, its circulation in 1975 was 3,000.

A1219. Radygin, Anatoly. "A closer look at life in the Mordovian concentration camp." / Anatoliy Radygin. ABN Correspondence. 25.2 (March-April 1974): 3-4, 8-11, 14-15.

Memoirs of a Jewish poet who spent eight years in the Vladimir prison and three years in Mordovian strict regime concentration camps. The memoirs contain silhouettes of his fellow prisoners - Ukrainian writers Sviatoslav Karavans'kyi, Zynovii Krasivs'kyi, Iosyp Terelia - and revelations about the cult of Shevchenko among the prisoners.

A1220. Radygin, Anatoly. "Message from Valentyn Moroz. Excerpt from Anatoly Radygin's "Episodes from Mordovia Concentration Camps." ABN Correspondence. 25.1 (January-February 1974): 1-2.

A memoir about Valentyn Moroz by a former fellow prisoner.

A1221. Radygin, Anatoly. "Valentyn Moroz continuously tortured. Moroz in prison." / Anatoliy Radygin. Ukrainian Review (London). 21.2 (Summer 1974): 46-47; 47-48.

Two almost identical versions of Radygin's description of the condition of his fellow- prisoner Valentyn Moroz in early 1973. The two versions are printed one after the other, probably by some printer's error. "Moroz is in a state of complete exhaustion and on the verge of insanity," says Radygin who was released in 1973 and obtained permission to emigrate to Israel.

A1222. "Rafalskyi, Viktor Parfenovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 83.

Viktor Rafal's'kyi born ca.1920 is characterized as "a techer, a writer and a poet". 14 lines of data on his dissident activities.

A1223. "Raisa Moroz's desperate plea." ABN Correspondence. 25.6 (November-December 1974): 1-2.

About the appeals and actions of Raisa Moroz on behalf of her husband Valentyn Moroz, currently a prisoner in the USSR.

A1224. Ravliuk, Mykola. "A critical word" / Mykola Ravlyuk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.7 (July 1975): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 May 1975): 2-3].

Says Ravliuk: Korinnia - a collection of poems by a 17-year old poet Borys Kornienko [Korniyenko] received unusual praise from two critics: M. Ilnyts'kyi and V. Briuhhen [Bryuhhen]. Ilnyts'kyi found Korniienko imitating and learning from Antonych, Briuhhen attempted to steer the young poet "toward the horizons of European artistic thought". Ravliuk finds it necessary to remind the two critics that Antonych is a controversial figure and should not be recommended as a model for young poets, and that "there are two literary Europes today - socialist and capitalist" with two different "class ideologies" and the critic should make the young poet aware of these distinctions. The Digest's title: "Critics scored for overrating first work".

A1225. "Readers' conferences." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.9 (September 1966): 12. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Ukrains'ka mova i literatura v shkoli. 6 (June 1966): 95].

A conference was held in Donetsk on 7 April 1966 for readers of the journal Ukrains'ka mova i literatura v shkoli. Participants of the conference were mostly teachers of language and literature in the oblast centers and raions, as well as university lecturers. Participants, according to the article, "expressed a wish that the journal should treat in greater depth the problems of instilling and heightening the interest of the students in the study of the Ukrainian language and literature, that literary articles should be purposeful and exemplary for the teachers with reference to the general analysis of works of art, instead of carrying a stamp of jubilee observance information."

A1226. "Recreating the image of contemporary man. At the open party meeting of the writers of Kiev." / El. Blazhko, B. Andriychenko, Yu. Tereshchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 21.3 (March 1977): 17-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 January 1977): 1-2].

A report on a party meeting of the Kyiv writers' organization [No date of the meeting is indicated]. The main speech at the meeting was delivered by Leonid Novychenko who singled out by title what he considered to be the most distinguished works in the fields of prose, poetry, drama and literary criticism produced in the last two years by Ukrainian writers of Kyiv. M. Steblyna, V. Drozd, V. Vynohrads'kyi [Vynohradskyy] and B. Chalyi [Chalyy] also spoke at the meeting. The Digest's title: "Novychenko addresses Kiev writers' party meeting."

A1227. "Reds erect Shevchenko statue in Paris amid protests of free Ukrainians." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.2 (Summer 1978): 221-222.

According to this article, a monument to Taras Shevchenko was unveiled in Paris on 24 May 1978. It was erected through the efforts of the Soviet embassy in France. Deputy mayor of Paris, Edouard Dupont, characterized in the article as "a staunch anti-Communist", spoke at the ceremony and "angered Soviet officials", because he spoke "about the greatness of Ukraine and Shevchenko without mentioning the Soviets." Some 150 demonstators led by Leonid Plyushch demonstrated their opposition, calling attention to Soviet censorship of Shevchenko, to hypocrisy and cynicism, repressions of Shevchenko celebrations in Ukraine, etc.

A1228. Reisman, Edward S. "The cult of Boris and Gleb: Remnant of a Varangian tradition?" Russian Review. 37.2 (April 1978): 141-157.

The author postulates a hypothesis "that the veneration of Boris and Gleb is a remnant of the cult of Odinn (the sovereign god of the Scandinavian peoples) which entered Russian Christianity through the Varangian presence in Kiev and flourished in the atmosphere of Dvoverie ("dual-faith") that followed the conversion of the Russian state in 988." Reisman makes a distinction between the veneration of the saintly princes Borys and Hlib and "the hagiographic style in which their vitae were composed". The latter, in his view, may well have been influenced by Western, especially Czech, hagiography.

A1229. "The 'release' of Ivan Sokulsky." Ukrainian Review (London). 23.3 (Autumn 1976): 89.

Brief news item about the poet Ivan Sokul's'kyi's release from Vladimir prison.

A1230. "The remembrance is evergreen." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.533 (54) (March 1971): 24-25. illus.

A collage of four photos of Taras Shevchenko monuments (in Kaniv, Kyiv, Kharkiv and Palermo, Canada), with a brief note.

A1231. "Report." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2 (1971-1972): 19- 20. Biblio.

Summary of an experimental seminar held under Omeljan Pritsak's chairmanship on 4 November 1971. The topic of this seminar was Slovo o polku Ihorevim and the work was subjected to the "new criticism" method. Members were asked to treat Slovo as a newly discovered work to be dated and analyzed by themselves.

A1232. "Report and election meetings in writers' organizations. To march in the vanguard!" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.2 (February 1974): 5-6. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 December 1973): 3].

Writers of the Zakarpattia branch of the Union of Writers of Ukraine met to discuss achievements and shortcomings and to elect new officers. B. Chalyi, secretary of the party committee of the Kyiv organization of the Union spoke at the meeting. Adverse critical comments were made about the work of P. Skunts, F. Kryvin, V. Fedynyshynets. Iu. Meihesh [Yu. V. Meyhesh] was re-elected responsible secretary. Digest's title: "Oblast writers' organizations hold report & election meetings."

A1233. "Report and election meetings in writers' organizations. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.2 (February 1974): 6-7. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 January 1974): 2].

Achievements and shortcomings were discussed by oblast writers' organizations in Lviv, Zhytomyr and Kherson. In Lviv R. Bratun' was re-elected chairman of the executive board. R. Lubkivs'kyi, I. Hrebeniuk, M. Romanchenko, M. Ilnyts'kyi, O. Bohachuk, V. Okpysh participated in the discussions. P. Zahrebel'nyi, secretary of the executive board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine from Kyiv, was present and spoke at the meeting. In Zhytomyr the meeting was addressed by O. Opanasiuk [Opanasyuk], M. Klymenko, Borys Ten, M. Kuryl'chuk, M. Mytsenko. Present as guests were V. Ostrozhynskyy, secretary of the oblast party committee and S. Oliinyk [Oliynyk], member of the presidium of the executive board of the Union from Kyiv. Ie. Kontsevych and S. Pinchuk were subjects of harsh criticism. V. Kanivets was elected responsible secretary. Kherson writers were addressed by L. Kulish, L. Fedorovs'ka, I. Kulichenko, V. Shevchenko, as well as by guests from Kyiv Iu. Mushketyk (member of the presidium of the Executive board) and M. Rud (member of the executive board) of the Union of Writers of Ukraine. M. Bratan was elected responsible secretary. The Digest's title: "Oblast writers' organizations hold reports and election meetings."

A1234. "Report and election meetings in writers' organizations: Kiev." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.4 (April 1974): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 March 1974): 1].

Iu. Zbanats'kyi [Yu. Zbanatskyy] reported on achievements and shortcomings. Among the latter he listed "the fact that some writers of the younger generation are overly concerned with narrowly personal experiences and impressions. Class accents are not always properly placed..." Hutsalo, H. Tiutiunnyk [Tyutyunnyk], I. Bilyk and B. Kharchuk were chastised for "flaws" and "ideologically erroneous conceptions". I. Tsiupa [Tsyupa], O.K Kapto, V.S. Drobiazko [Drobyazko], V.D. Dobrotvor, O.K. Romanovs'kyi [Romanovskyy] also spoke. Zbanats'kyi was re-elected as first secretary. The Digest's title: "Kiev writers hold meeting, elect officers."

A1235. "Report arrest of Oles Berdnyk." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.2 (Summer 1979): 222.

According to this news item in the "Chronicle of current events", Oles' Berdnyk was arrested in the USSR in March 1979. Berdnyk is characterized as a writer, poet, futurologist and one of the original members of Ukrainian Public Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords.

A1236. "Report Rudenko's transfer to prison in Donetsk." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.2 (Summer 1977): 223.

A news item in the "Chronicle of current events", smuggled out of Ukraine, about Mykola Rudenko's transfer from a prison in Kyiv to Donets'k.

A1237. "Reports and elections in writers' organizations." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.4 (April 1976): 18-21. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 February 1976): 4 and (2 March 1976): 3].

Excerpts from separate reports covering the Kyiv, Kherson, Dnipropetrovsk, Kharkiv and Odessa, as well as Lviv, Donetsk, Poltava, Mykolaiv, and Zaporizhzhia writers organizations. The Digest's title: "Oblast writers' organizations hold report and election meetings."

A1238. "Repressions continue against female political prisoners." Ukrainian Review (London). 23.4 (Winter 1976): 89-90.

Among the prisoners mentioned in this samvydav report are women-writers Iryna Stasiv-Kalynets' and Iryna Senyk.

A1239. "Republican conference of young writers." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.5 (May 1974): 6. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (12 April 1974): 1].

A three day conference of some 150 young prose writers, poets and playwrights from all the oblasts of Ukraine began on the 11th of April in Kyiv. V.P. Kozachenko and M.Z. Shamota addressed the gathering. The Digest's title: "Hold republican conference of young writers."

A1240. Reshetilov, Vadim . "Authors, publishers, books." Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 2.

The author, who is manager of the UkrSSR Branch of the USSR Copyright Agency (VAAP), discusses the work of his agency. VAAP maintains "solid business relations with some one thousand international firms and organizations" and is engaged in "varied and vigorous preparations for book exhibitions," says Reshetilov.

A1241. "Resolution of the 6th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.4 (April 1975): 12-13. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (18 February 1975): 1].

The Digest's title: "Plenum resolves to rectify shortcomings in Union organs." According to this resolution, which deals with the implementation of the directives of the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, the Plenum "wishes to draw attention of the editorial boards of the journals Vitchyzna, Raduga, Vsesvit, Zhovten', Prapor, Donbas, Radians'ke literaturoznavstvo and the newspaper Literaturna Ukraina to fundamental shortcomings in their organizational and creative work and enjoins them to take the necessary steps to rectify these matters".

A1242. "Resolution no.2". Nationalities Papers. 4.2 (Fall 1976): 162-163.

A resolution of the annual business meeting of the AAASS (American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies) which took place in Atlanta, GA on 10 October 1975. The resolution passed by 467 to 98 votes supports the right to free speech of Ukrainian and Jewish intellectuals currently in Soviet prisons. Among those listed are several Ukrainian writers, i.e. Chornovil, Moroz, Kalynets', Osadchyi, Stus, Sverstiuk, Svitlychnyi.

A1243. "Resolution of the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. (17.5 (May 1973): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (27 March 1973): 1].

The Resolution states: "Our position in the struggle against imperialist propaganda, against the intrigues of bourgeois nationalism and Zionism, against falsifiers of Leninist nationalities policies, is the position of patriots and internationalists for whom the interests of the Soviet homeland and the happiness of the workers of the great Country of Soviets, won in the fiery crucible of revolutionary struggle and on the fronts of the civil war, are supreme..." The Digest's title: "Writers called upon to combat nationalism and zionism."

A1244. "Response to Soviet Russian statements re: Valentyn Moroz." ABN Correspondence. 26.1 (January-February 1975): 40-41.

According to this unsigned article, the Soviet Embassy in Canada - reacting to "tens of thousands" of petitions and appeals on behalf of Valentyn Moroz - has issued statements attempting "to justify the harshness of Moroz's sentence and the illegality of his trial." The present response, dated December 1974 and signed by the Committee for the Defense of Valentyn Moroz, makes the following points: 1/ "The Soviet authorities consider it necessary to justify Moroz's imprisonment by alleging 'crimes' for which Moroz was clearly not indicted"; Moroz was tried and sentenced in accordance with Art.62 of the Criminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR (anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda) and not for treason, espionage and other serious crimes alleged by the Embassy. 2/ Application and interpretation of Art.62 by Soviet courts "is so broad that it in effect nullifies the right of freedom of speech and of the press guaranteed by Art.105 of the Constitution of the Ukrainian SSR, Art.125 of Court of USSR". 3/ The fact that Moroz's trial was closed to the public must also be considered a violation of procedural norms (Art.370 and 389 of the Code of Criminal Procedure of the Ukrainian SSR). "... in light of the illegality of Moroz's trial we demand his immediate and unconditional release," says the statement.

A1245. "Return Moroz to Mordovia." Nationalities Papers. 4.2 (Fall 1976): 166-167.

News item about the tranfers of Valentyn Moroz, currently a Soviet prisoner, from Vladimir prison to Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry (in May of 1976), then back to Butyrka prison in June, and finally to Mordovian camp No.1, near Barashevo.

A1246. "Revuts'kiy, Dmitriy Nikolayevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 476.

Bio-bibliographical data about Dmytro Revuts'kyi, folklorist and literary historian (b. 12 March 1881, d.29 December 1941).

A1247. Revutsky, Valerian. "The Act of Ems (1876) and its effect on Ukrainian theatre." Nationalities Papers. 5.1 (Spring 1977): 67-78.

Revutsky traces the Tsarist Russian censorship and prohibition of plays in Ukrainian since 1876 and claims that "policies prevalent during the Act of Ems have been continued by the Soviet government."

A1248. Revutsky, Valerian. "Between Sonata Pathétique and Optimistic Tragedy". Studia Ucrainica. 1(1978): 111-121.

The play "Patetychna sonata" by Mykola Kulish, though prohibited in Ukraine in 1930, was first performed on the stages of the Leningrad Drama Theater and the Moscow Kamernyi Theater in 1930. Even though it disappeared from the repertoire of Soviet theaters and the writer perished in a Soviet gulag, this play, "noted for its innovative theatrical form", according to Revutsky, "greatly influenced the developments in Soviet dramaturgy and theatre". Revutsky traces the influences of "Patetychna sonata" on Schiller's tragedy "Kabale und Liebe" staged by Vladimir Nelli (aka Nellivlad), artistic director of the Russian Drama Theater in Kyiv (e.g. Beethoven's music interwoven into the entire production), on L. Pervomais'kyi's drama "Nevidomi soldaty" performed at various Ukrainian theaters, but also at Moscow's Kamernyi Theater (kaleidoscopical effect of "Patetychna sonata" utilized by stage designer Vadim Ryndin), and on Vsevolod Vishnevsky's "Optimistic Tragedy" at Kamernyi (where "Patetychna sonata"'s influence is most pronounced in the structure of the play, its guiding characters, changes in the mood from heroic to lyrical, musical score, use of contrasts, method of building characters on laconic cues, etc.), according to Revutsky.

A1249. Revutsky, Valerian. "Mykola Kulish in the modern Ukrainian theatre." / V. Revutsky. Slavonic and East European Review. 49.116 (July 1971): 355-364.

Mykola Kulish "merits a full-scale critical investigation", says the author, not only because he is not well known, and "not only because his dramatic works give a clear picture of the evolution of life in the Ukraine during the first fifteen years of the Soviet régime or because his dramatic technique is on a level with that of his contemporaries in the world theatre, but also because his exceptional talent was able to anticipate and solve in the 1920's many of the problems which emerged on the world stage only a decade later and have not lost their urgency even today." Revutsky discusses Kulish's collaboration with Berezil's theater director Les' Kurbas and analyses Kulish's plays, especially "Narodnyi Malakhii" and "Maklena Grasa".

A1250. Revutsky, Valerian. "A survey of the Ukrainian post-war drama." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 14.2 (Summer 1972): 251-267.

Despite some laxity during the war years and during the "thaw" in the early 1960's, Ukrainian post war drama is back in the full grip of socialist realism, says Revutsky. Among its regular characteristics, in his opinion, are: development of a new Soviet repertoire, dominance of Soviet Russian plays and avoidance of contemporary non-Soviet works, condemnation of formalism and prohibition of experimental theater, as well as the continuation of "the literary-theatrical system of K. Stanislavsky" as the only method in the work of producers and actors. Revutsky surveys the current repertoire of Soviet Ukrainian theater and lists a number of new Soviet Ukrainian plays grouping them according to their subject matter: militant war themes, unification of Ukraine with Russia, anti-American propaganda, reconstruction of industry, collective farms, history of the revolution, anti-religious themes, optimistic tragedies, etc. A French summary of Revuts'ky's article appears on p.268.

A1251. Revutsky, Valerian. "Two satires by Mykola Kulish ('Has-beens', new 'Hegemons' and classical traditions)." Iuvileinyi zbirnyk Ukraïns'koï Vil'noï Akademiï Nauk v Kanadi = The Jubilee Collection of the Ukrainian Free Acxademy of Sciences in Canada. Ed. by O.W. Gerus, A. Baran, J. Rozumnyj. Winnipeg: UVAN, 1976. 233-248.

A detailed critical analysis of two plays by Mykola Kulish: "Otak zahynuv Huska" (1925) and "Khulii Khuryna" (1926). Says Revutsky: "In Thus Perished Huska and Khulii Khuryna Kulish reveals his talent as a satirist of the Philistines." ... "In the character of Huska, the dramatist presents a small, cowardly and frightened petty bourgeois, harmless and unsuited for conscious objection to Soviet authority on the one hand and, on the other, a man completely unable to adapt to the new regime". Revutsky points out the comic techniques of Molière used by Kulish in the first play and the Gogolian qualities in the structure of "Khulii Khuryna" which utilizes the plot elements of Gogol's Inspector-General. According to Revutsky the artistic devices of both Molière and Gogol were later successfully used in Kulish's 1929 "second satire on the Philistines, "Myna Mazailo"." Some dialogs from "Otak zahynuv Huska" and "Khulii Khuryna" are quoted in translation to illustrate some points made by the critic.

A1252. "Revutsky, Valerian". Men of Achievement. 5 (1978): 490. port.

Twenty-three lines of bio-bibliographical data, with portrait, about the Slavic scholar (born 1911).

A1253. Rich, Vera. "Ivan Franko and the English poets." Ukrainian Quarterly. 22.2 (Summer 1966): 122-128.

An examination of influences on Ivan Franko of English poetry reveals, in Vera Rich's opinion, "not a mere table of correspondences, but some significant light upon the poet's work as a whole". Rich discusses Franko's interest in, references to or translations from Milton, Thomas Moore, Shakespeare, Shelley, Spenser, Tennyson and especially Byron. "Franko's debt to Byron is considerable," says Vera Rich, "not least perhaps in that the translation of Cain, occurring relatively early in Franko's career (1879) may well have quickened his interest in the use of Biblical themes, and it is possible that, without Cain, we would have had no Moses. ...it should also be observed that Byron's Hebrew Melodies... had at least the effect of inspiration upon Franko's Hebrew Melodies..." "... it again seems likely that Byron's work supplied the theme and germ of an idea, which Franko then developed in his own way and towards his own goal," says Rich.

A1254. Rich, Vera. "Ivan Kotlyarevsky: an appreciation." Ukrainian Quarterly. 25.4 (Winter 1969): 331-336.

Published on the occasion of Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi's 200 birth anniversary, the article serves as an introduction to two poetic translations by Vera Rich, i.e. Shevchenko's "To the eternal memory of Kotlyarevsky (Sunlight growing and wind blowing) (pp.334-336) and Franko's "Kotlyarevsky (A mighty eagle on a snow-peak hoary) (p.336) [cf. T078, T366]. Rich discusses Kotliarevs'kyi's innovations: the breaking with the "formal, stultifying traditions of Church Slavonic", his stylistic innovations, his choice of subject matter and theme, his "breaking with the old syllabic metre", his being "the first Ukrainian poet to use 'masculine' (mono-syllabic) rhymes". The two translated poems are tributes of young poets - Shevchenko was 24 when he wrote his poem, Franko was 17. They are grateful to Kotliarevs'kyi, in Rich's view, "not merely as a creator of the Ukrainian literary tradition, but as the creator of their very tool of literary expression."

A1255. Riznyk, Mykhailo. "The temple of Ukrainian books." / Mykhaylo Riznyk. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.11 (November 1969): 13-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (3 October 1969): 4].

A plea for the creation of "a museum of books and printing in honor of the epochal 400th anniversary [of the first printed book in Ukraine] which we will be celebrating in five years time." Digest's title: "Museum of books and printing in Ukraine proposed."

A1256. Robinson, A.N. "Kievan Rus'. Literature." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 12 (1976): 443.

After discussing early Christian and Byzantine masterpieces translated from Bulgarian and Greek, the author says: "In the second quarter of the 11th century an original literature began to develop in Kievan Rus', including chronicles, the lives of saints, and homilies. With a rhetorical skill that was not inferior to Byzantine eloquence, Metropolitan Ilarion wrote on the problems of the superiority of Christianity to paganism and the grandeur of Rus' among nations in his Discourse on Law and Grace. The ideas of state-building permeate the chronicles of Kiev and Novgorod. Chronicles turned to the poetic traditions of pagan folklore..." The 47-line note on literature is a sub-section of a longer article on Kyivan Eus' in general on pp.441-445.

A1257. Robinson, A.N. "Old Russian tales". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 20 (1979): 181.

The first two paragraphs of this half-page article discuss the historical epics and historical biographies developed in medieval Kyivan Rus'.

A1258. "Roman Kupchynsky." Ukrainian Quarterly. 32.2 (Summer 1976): 219-220.

An obituary note in the "Chronicle of current events". Roman Kupchyns'kyi, poet and journalist, was born in Rozhadiv, Western Ukraine, on 24 September 1894 and died in New York City on 10 June 1976 at the age of 81.

A1259. Romanets', Oleksa. "Enrichment of Rumanian studies of Ukrainian." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.8 (August 1966): 22-23. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (21 June 1966): 4].

A note about Magdalena Laszlo and her works about the Romanian-Ukrainian literary relations and her study of women's emancipation in the works of Ol'ha Kobylians'ka (published in a Ukrainian translation in 1963). The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Interest in Ukrainian studies seen in Rumania".

A1260. Romanyshyn, Oleh S. "The Tale of Ihor's Campaign" and the "Poem of the Cid": a tentative comparative study. Ukrainian Review (London). 17.3 (Autumn 1970): 65-84.

An attempt to compare the Spanish medieval heroic epic Poema de Mio Cid [Cantar de Mio Cid] with Slovo o polku Ihorevim. The author finds "some similar traits which stem not only from a common European medieval environment, but from a somewhat similar spiritual and human outlook of the two peoples..." Excerpts from Slovo are cited in Watson Kirkconnell's translation from The Ukrainian Poets, 1189-1962 (Toronto: 1963) [cf. ULE: Books and Pamphlets, 1890-1965, B2 ]. Appendix I contains a summary of "The Poem of the Cid" (pp.82-83); Appendix II (pp.83-84) provides a biography of the historical Cid Campeador whose real name was Rodrigo Diaz.

A1261. Ronen, Omry. "Two problems of Russian- Ukrainian literary relations in the early twentieth century." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2 (1971- 1972): 5-6. Biblio.

Summary of the paper presented on 30 September 1971 by Omry Ronen, professor of Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and of the discussion that followed. The speaker discussed the messianic role of the revolution - a theme well developed in Russian symbolism - in relationship to the poetry of Pavlo Tychyna. Tychyna in his poem "I Belyi, i Blok, i Iesenin, i Kliuiev", according to Ronen, "used Russian texts not as paradigms of form but as objects for polemical attack". The second problem discussed were certain phenomena in Russian literature of the 20th century (i.e. Khlebnikov) which are based on Ukrainian literature and folk traditions.

A1262. Rosokha, Stanislav. "How long will they be beginners?" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.4 (April 1968): 23-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 March 1968): 4].

According to Rosokha, there is a young group of poets in Ukraine who find it difficult to have their works published. At one time the Prapor Publ. House published miniature boxed sets of poetry collections - 12 books per year - but this practice was discontinued. Rosokha makes a plea for poetry supplements to be added to newspapers, if book publication is not possible. The Digest's supplied title reads: "Kharkiv poets can't publish".

A1263. Rossels, V. "Mikhailo Stelmakh and his books." Soviet Russian Literature in English: a checklist bibliography by George Gibian. Ithaca: Center for International Studies, Cornell University, 1967. 324-326.

The annotation in this selective bibliography covering 33 individual authors, says about Mykhailo Stel'makh: "His novels about peasants... are imbued with such compelling poetic charm and offer such a profound and novel analysis of the peasant's soul, that they deservedly attract increasing numbers of readers."

A1264. "The routes of Ukrainian books." / RATAU. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 19.9 (September 1975): 18-19. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 July 1975): 4].

In an interview with RATAU news agency, H.Ya. Demydenko, director of the Ukrainian Book Export office, said: "In 1974 we filled orders from foreign firms for close to 5 million copies of books." The Digest's title: "Five million UkSSR books sold abroad in 1974".

A1265. Rozumnyj, Jaroslav. "Byzantinism and idealism in the aesthetic views of Taras Shevchenko." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 19.2 (June 1977): 193-206.

Shevchenko's aesthetic views have not been sufficiently studied, says Rozumnyj. The stated intention of his article is "to discuss Shevchenko's views on Byzantine elements in Russian art, religion and politics as well as on the idealism of the nineteenth-century Munich school of German painters." Rozumnyj quotes extensively from Shevchenko's diary, letters and prose to illustrate the poet's views on aesthetics and to show his "negative attitude toward Byzantinism and idealism - especially extreme 'Suzdal' Byzantinism and extreme 'Munich' idealism in art and Weltanschauung... Byzantine mysticism, abstractionism and schematism was foreign to Shevchenko, claims Rozumnyj. In Shevchenko's thought, according to Rozumnyj, "the realms of the ideal and the real met halfway... Shevchenko regarded all human and supernatural elements in relation to concrete reality and from this alluded to the ideal." "In the course of his pursuit of the ideal," says Rozumnyj, "Shevchenko found the divine in man and the human in God. By bringing the natural and the supernatural, the real and the ideal to a common denominator, he created a form of realistic idealism or ideal realism. He discovered beauty in man to the limits of the divine and beauty in nature to the borders of pantheism." A French abstract of the article appears on p.256.

A1266. Rozumnyj, Jaroslav. "Conflicting ideals in Lesia Ukrainka's Stone Host." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 15.3 (Autumn 1973): 382-389.

In Lesia Ukrainka's drama "Kaminnyi hospodar" (Stone Host), according to Jaroslav Rozumnyj, "conflict takes place between the bearers of unethical ideals of unlimited freedom (Don Juan) and limitless power (Donna Anna) on one hand, and the bearer of ethical ideals of conservative law and order (Don Gonzago), on the other." "In the sphere of human reality", says Rozumnyj, "the unethical and anarchic world of Don Juan and Donna Anna triumphs in the murder of Don Gonzago; however, in the mystical sphere, the ethical ideals of Don Gonzago triumph as he symbolically kills the unscrupulous pretenders to his office and title." The French summary of the paper appears on p. 389.

A1267. Rozumnyj, Jaroslav. "Modern literary criticism." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1971-1972. 2 (1971-1972): 31-32. Biblio.

Summary of a paper presented by the University of Manitoba professor Jaroslav Rozumnyj on 23 November 1971 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, in what is characterized as a"quite provocative talk on aspects of literary criticism", "stressed the importance of an involved and informed milieu for the literary development of individuals and groups" and topics such as the New York Group of poets, "possibilities as well as pitfalls of avant-garde experimentation in the absence of appropriate critical attitudes on the part of both the poets and the public", and the Ivan Drach - Bohdan Kravtsiv controversy were discussed.

A1268. Rozumnyj, Jaroslav. "Ukrainian American poet of the avant garde." Forum. 21 (1973): 18. port.

An article about Yuriy Tarnawsky to accompany a translation of his poem "Thoughts about my death" printed in the same issue. [cf. T420]. "George [sic] Tarnawsky is a poet of challenging thought and bold poetic expression," says Rozumnyj. "His style is a skillful combination of prose and poetry, of the lyric and epic manner which creates simultaneously a sensation of warm intimacy and cold rationality. His keen mind works extremely fast and enables him to grasp many shades of reality and a wide gamut of associations, usually shocking and paradoxical, in a flashing psychodelic manner..."

A1269. Rubach, M.A. "Grushevskii, Mikhail Sergeevich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 461. Biblio.

An article of 84 lines about Mykhailo Hrushevs'kyi (1866-1934), who is characterized here as "Ukrainian bourgeois historian and historian of Ukrainian literature." In Rubach's opinion, "... the scholarly value of Grushevskii's works was limited by tendentiousness in the selection and generalization of facts and by the nationalistic interpretation of sources."

A1270. "Ruban, Ivan." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 85-86.

Six lines about dissident activity of the poet Ivan Ruban.

A1271. Rud', Mykola. "Address by Mykola Rud." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.5 (May 1975): 16. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (27 March 1973): 3].

Speaking at the 4th Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine, Rud' says: "Together with our young writers we must show our irreconcilability toward hostile ideology which sometimes tries to win over the souls of young, and not so young, writers. We refer to the affair surrounding the critic Dzyuba, whose writings are being exploited by bourgeois propaganda..." The Digest's title: "Dzyuba's writings exploited by bourgeois propaganda, says Rud."

A1272. Rud', Mykola. "Under the banner of high exactingness." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.12 (December 1974): 10-11. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (8 November 1974): 4].

The Digest's title: "Writers' party organizations elect secretaries". According to M. Rud, "The party bureaus of all twelve primary organizations prepared their reports...", one hundred twenty six writers took the floor at the meetings, Iu. Bedzyk, V. Kochevs'kyi [Kochevskyy], H. Plotkin, B. Komar, Yu. Chykyrysov, P. Osadchuk, V. Reshetylov, M. Vladko, B. Rohoza, O. Rohotchenko, A. Bozhenko and H. Maisternko [Maystrenko] were elected secretaries of the respective party organizations.

A1273. "Rudanskii, Stepan Vasil'evich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 22 (1979): 324. Biblio.

According to GSE, Stepan Rudans'kyi "denounced serfdom and the parasitism and bribe-taking of government officials... His best work is the cycle of humorous poetic pieces Spivomovki... permeated with satirical and antireligious motifs." Rudans'kyi's translations of Slovo o polku Ihorevim and of Homer's Iliad are mentioned also. (17 lines).

A1274. "Rudenko and Tykhy receive heavy sentences." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.3 (Autumn 1977): 334-335.

According to this news item in the "Chronicle of current events", Mykola Rudenko, head of Ukrainian Public Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords and O. Tykhyi were sentenced on 1 July 1977 on charges of anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda at a secret trial in Druzhkivka, Donetsk area of Ukraine. Rudenko was sentenced to seven years of incarceration and five years of exile, Tykhyi - to ten years of confinement and five years of exile.

A1275. "Rudenko, Mykola Danylovych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 86-87. port.

Biographical data with a focus on his dissident activity about the writer Mykola Rudenko born 1920. (15 lines).

A1276. "Rudenko, Nikolay Danilovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 526.

Twenty lines of bio-bibliographical data about the poet and novelist Mykola Rudenko, born 1920.

A1277. "The Rudenko-Tykhy trial: the trial of Rudenko and Tykhy takes place in total secrecy." Ukrainian Review (London). 25.1 (Spring 1978): 36- 57.

A report on the trial which took place in Druzhkivka, Donets'k oblast, on 23 June 1977. The report was, apparently, smuggled out to the West. Mykola Rudenko, a prominent Ukrainian writer, was also the head of the Ukrainian Helsinki Group. (Ukrainian Public Group to Promote the Implementation of the Helsinki Accords).

A1278. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Africa in life and work of Lesya Ukraïnka." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.3 (Autumn 1970): 49-57.

A lecture delivered on 2 September 1970 at the 6th Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association. The congress was held from 31 August to 6 September 1970 at the University of Bordeaux-Talence in France. According to J.B. Rudnyckyj: Lesia Ukrainka has a number of poems on Egyptian themes ("Sfinks", "Ra-Meneis", "Iehypet's'ki barel'iefy", "Izrail v Iehypti"), her drama "V domu roboty, v kraini nevoli" takes place in Egypt. She spent the winters in Helwan, near Cairo, in 1909/1910, 1911/1912 and in 1912/1913. She translated some old Egyptian inscriptions (by way of German translations of A. Wiedeman's Die Unterhaltungs-Literatur der alten Aegyptier, 1903), she wrote the cycle "Vesna v Iehypti" and began a novel on Arabian life. The novel was never finished, but the first chapter of it was published posthumously in Literaturno-naukovyj vistnyk (v.66, 1913, pp.4-9). Rudnyckyj quotes 12 lines of Lesia Ukrainka's poem Napys v ruini : "I am the tsar of tsars, I am the son of the sun" in his own translation while quoting also the same 12 lines in Percival Cundy's translation ("The King of Kings, I, Aton's mighty son") in a footnote (both on p.51).

A1279. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "A case of literary oscillation: tradition and originality in Ukrainian Canadian literature". Actes du IVe Congrès de l'Association Internationale de Littérature Comparée=Proceedings of the IVth Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, Fribourg 1964. Ed. by François Jost. Hague: Mouton, 1966. 1359-1362.

An attempt at general evaluation of the literary output of Ukrainians in Canada, with an emphasis on "the thematic oscillation between the Old Country and the new environment". The author singles out for their special achievement Ilia Kyriiak, whose "magnificent saga of Western Canada", the novel Syny zemli, Rudnyckyj considers "among the finest literary records of the Western prairies"; Alexander Luhovyj (aka as William Ovrutsky-Shwabe) whose novel Bezkhatnyi, according to Rudnyckyj, "drew a realistic picture of the life in Canada during the economic crisis of that era"; and M. Mandryka, whose poem "Kanada", in the author's opinion, is "well constructed, magnificently styled, bright and optimistic in its mood and entirely Canadian".

A1280. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Canadian and Argentine-Brasilian novels on Ukrainian pioneers." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.3 (Autumn 1974): 91-96 + inside back cover.

A paper originally read at the 7th Congress of the International Association for Comparative Literature on 17 August 1973 in Ottawa, Canada. The two novels being compared in this paper are Syny zemli by Illia Kyriiak (originally in three volumes, published in 1939-1945) and Na stepu chervonoi zemli by Volodar Buzhenko (pseud. of V. Zinko), published in Prudentopolis in 1962. What the two novels have in common, says J.B.Rudny kyj, is 1/ the theme: arrival of new immigrants and the process of taking root in the new land; 2/ the language: popular Ukrainian presented in a narrative style; 3/ a deep, almost mystic, attachement to the soil; 4/ great stress on religion and Christian faith of characters; 5/ strong family cohesiveness and devotion. The differences between the two novels, according to Rudny kyj, stem from 1/ different environments in North and South America, both the physical and the social environment; 2/ differences in the composition and stucture of the novels; 3/ some differences in language and style due to Canadian influences in Kyriiak and South-American influences in Buzhenko; and 4/ degree of authenticity or historicity of characters (Unlike Kyriiak, Buzhenko states that all his characters have been taken from real life).

A1281. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Dyv-Div in Slovo o polku Ihorevi." / Jaroslav B. Rudnyc'kyj. Studia Ucrainica. 1(1978): 75-79.

The author discusses the various interpretations of the word "Dyv" in Slovo o polku Ihorevim, such as "the demon bird", "a deity in the form of a bird", "a mythical forest demon", "an allegorical portrayal of a courier of disaster or calamity in the likeness of a bird", "a mythical ill-omened creature", etc. and concludes that it is best to interpret "Dyv" as a "personification of bad, inimical spirit".

A1282. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "The first Canadian evaluation of Shevchenko." Promin'. 8.3 (March 1969): 15. port.

A note about what the author calls "the first learned appreciation of Shevchenko's life and work" in Canada, the article by F.L. Tilson published in the University Magazine in Montreal in vol.14 for 1915. No title of the article or paging is given, but see ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A721.

A1283. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "The first Canadian evaluation of Shevchenko." / J. Rudnyckyj. Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 28.3 (322) (March 1977): 22. port.

Possibly a reprint or another version of A1282 or of ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A582.

A1284. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "In memory of W. Kirkconnell." Zhinochyi svit=Woman's World. 28.4 (323) (April 1977): 21. port.

Text of a letter of condolences to Mrs. Hope Kirkconnell on the death of her husband Watson Kirkconnell, a noted Canadian scholar and translator of Ukrainian literature. Rudny kyj's letter is signed on behalf of the World Academic Committee of Free Ukrainians and the Canadian Delegation of the Ukrainian Free University.

A1285. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Literary work and the problem of bilingual creativity (some Slavic examples)." Études slaves et est-européennes=Slavic and East European Studies. 19 (1974): 44-51.

Extracts from a paper read at the 12th International FILLM Congress, Cambridge, England, 25 August 1972. According to the author: "... the purpose of the present paper is to discuss some general points of the translation of literary works from the point of view of the transformational-generative method and, in conclusion, to present a formula (model) of bilingual creativity as evidenced by both the 'free' and the 'literal' translations." To illustrate, Rudny kyj provides examples from Ukrainian literature (from P. Kulish's Chorna Rada, which was originally written in Ukrainian and then was given a free Russian translation by its author, from M. Ryl's'kyi's two different translations of A. Pushkin's poem "Three Springs" and from five different versions of the English translation of the first stanza of Shevchenko's "Zapovit" as rendered by A.J. Hunter, Percy Paul Selver, Vera Rich, C.A. Manning and John Weir).

A1286. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Tribute to Skovoroda on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of his birth." Ukrainian Review (London). 20.2 (Summer 1973): 15-18.

A paper delivered originally at the annual meeting of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL) in New York on 29 December 1972. Rudny kyj lists Skovoroda's main works and discusses briefly his ideas. "... The Socratic 'knowledge of oneself' is the basic [sic] of Skovoroda's philosophical system. The knowledge of the individual 'microcosm' is for him the departure point for the knowledge of 'macrocosm' - the universe. Self-knowledge, therefore, is the first step in all his philosophical contemplations," says Rudny kyj.

A1287. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Ukrainian-Canadian letters: a case of literary regionalism." Mosaic. 1.3 (April 1968): 51-57. 3 maps.

Ukrainian-Canadians, according to Rudnyckyj, have developed "a prolific and individualized regional literature." Its main characteristics, in the author's view, are: 1/ "its preoccupation in theme with the Ukrainian settlement areas in Canada, primarily in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta", 2/ the language and style of Ukrainian poetry, prose and drama is the language based on the dialects of Western Ukraine which, according to Rudnyckyj, is spoken by some 10% of population in the "Ukrainian-Canadian belt", 3/ "the interests and aspirations of characters", says Rudnyckyj, "are firmly rooted in the peasant's view of reality which is determined by his strong attachment to the soil, restricted intellectual horizons,... the first generation's hunger for financial security and absorption in the new land, and sentimental attitudes towards the Old Country." Three maps show the distribution of Ukrainian settlers in the Prairie Provinces of Canada.

A1288. Rudnyckyj, J.B. "Venedici of "Igor Song" - a case in onomastic pars pro toto." / Jaroslav B. Rudny kyj. Canadian Contributions to the Seventh International Congress of Slavists. Warsaw, August 21-27, 1973. Ed. by Zbigniew Folejewski et al. The Hague: Mouton, 1973. (Slavistic printings and reprintings, 285). 251-254.

A note posing the hypothesis that the phrase "Tu Nemci i Venedici..." in Slovo o polku Ihorevim refers not to Venetians, but to Italians in general, as was assumed, contrary to established practice, by Osyp Iurii Fed'kovych, a Ukrainian translator of Slovo o polku Ihorevim and J. Jungmann, the Czech translator.

A1289. Rudnytsky, Ivan L. "A publication of the German writings of Ivan Franko." Slavic Review. 26.1 (March 1967): 141-147.

A review article of the East-German publication of Ivan Franko's selected writings in the German language. [Beiträge zur Geschichte und Kultur der Ukraine: ausgewählte deutsche Schriften des revolutionären Demokraten, 1882-1915. Ed., with a pref. and annotations by E. Winter and P. Kirchner in collaboration with O.I. Bilec'kyj and I.I. Bass. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1963. x, 577 p. (Quellen und Studien zur Geschichte Osteuropas, v. 14). The reviewer points out a series of "shortcomings typical of scholarly works originating in Communist countries" such as omission of important materials for ideological reasons, "muddled" passages to camouflage unacceptable political views and ideas, prudishness which leads to false biographical statements, and misinterpretations of Franko's political philosophy, especially of his views on Marxism.

A1290. Rudnytsky, Ivan L. "A work of Ukrainian Cossack historiography." Canadian Slavonic Papers. 18.1 (March 1976): 73-79.

A review article of The Eyewitness Chronicle. Part 1 (Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 1972. xviii, 468 p. Harvard series in Ukrainian studies, v.VII, pt.1) [cf. B022]. Litopys Samovydtsia (Eyewitness Chronicle) is the earliest of the Cossack chronicles and describes events in Ukraine from Khmelnyts'kyi's uprising in 1648 through the year 1702. In the view of Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi, the prominent historian of Ukrainian literature, historiography of the Baroque period can properly be classified with belles lettres. Moreover, as Ivan Rudnytsky points out in this review article, Litopys Samovydtsia had considerable influence on Ukrainian literature, especially as a source of Panteleimon Kulish's novel Chorna rada.

A1291. Rudnytzky, Leonid. "Commentary". The Ukrainian Experience in the United States: a symposium. Ed. by Paul R. Magocsi. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute [©1979]. (Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Sources and documents series). 174-178.

Rudnytzky's commentary is on the paper by George Grabowicz "New directions in Ukrainian poetry in the United States" presented at the bicentennial symposium in Boston in December 1976 [cf. A402]. Rudnytzky takes issue with some of Grabowicz's statements claiming that Grabowicz ignored or underestimated the innovative factors in the work of such poets as Evhen Malaniuk, Vadym Lesych and Petro Karpenko-Krynytsia, the literary kinship of the New York Group of poets with non-Ukrainian masters, the recent turn toward tradition of Bohdan Rubchak, a member of the New York Group, and the attempts by some poets, such as Marta Tarnavs'ka, "to find a synthesis of traditional and modern ways in both form and content".

A1292. Rudnytzky, Leonid. "Ivan Franko and the theory of naturalism." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1975-1976. 6 (1975-1976): 53-57. Biblio.

Summary of a paper read on 19 February 1977 by Leonid Rudnytzky, professor of La Salle College, and of the discussion that followed the presentation. Rudnytzky, according to this summary, pointed out the German naturalist techniques present in Franko's poem Pans'ki zharty, and claimed that "Franko made use of principles enunciated in the doctrine of the so- called Konsequenter Naturalismus even before this doctrine was officially formulated (by Arno Holtz in his Die Kunst, ihr Wesen und ihre Gesetze in 1891)."

A1293. Rudnytzky, Leonid. "Ivan Franko - a translation [sic] of German literature." / Leo D. Rudnytzky. Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S. 12.1-2 (33-34) (1969-1972): 143-150.

The typographical error appears in the title only; both the running title and the table of contents list the article as "Ivan Franko - a translator of German literature". Rudnytzky takes issue with the Soviet view that Franko's chief reason for literary translations of West-European literatures was his struggle against the anti-realist tendencies in those literatures. According to Rudnytzky, there were two motivating factors for his many translations. One was of a "purely artistic-aesthetic nature" and the other was to attempt through these translations to raise the intellectual level of his countrymen, to broaden their cultural horizons. "This dual motivation determined his choice of German literary works for translation and, to a large extent, even his manner of translation," says Rudnytzky. In his view, "... Franko's translations from German literature are characterized by an earnest attempt to preserve the content and form of the original without committing undue violence to the Ukrainian language. In those instances where translation appeared impossible, because of the different character of the two languages, Franko sacrifices form in order to preserve meaning" ..."whenever Franko attempted to retain the form of the original at all costs, the translation displays certain stylistic imperfections which seriously impair its aesthetic value. This is the case in his translation of Goethe's Faust I." However, translation of the third act of Faust II, published in 1899, in Rudnytsky's view, is among Franko's best translations. In addition to Goethe, Rudnytsky discusses Franko's translations of the Hildebrandslied, fragments of Nibelungenlied, Muspilli as well as works of Heine, Gottfried Keller, C.F. Meyer, Lessing, Schiller, Kleist, Detlev von Liliencron and some other writers.

A1294. Rudnytzky, Leonid. "Shevchenko in English translation." Papers of the Congress of Ukrainian Scholars of the Contennial of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society, 1976. (Memoirs of the Shevchenko Scientific Society, v. 187). 275-276.

An English summary of a Ukrainian article printed on pp.116-126. Rudnytzky's article provides a critical analysis of English translations of Shevchenko's poetry done by such translators as C.A. Manning, Herbert Marshall, C. Andrusyshen and Watson Kirkconnell, Vera Rich and John Weir. Excerpts from these translations, together with the originals, appear in the Ukrainian text as follows: "Sons of mine, O haydamaki", tr. by C.A.Manning of "Syny moi, haidamaky", 8 lines, p.117; "At one time in Ukraina" (8 lines, tr. by Manning of "Bulo kolys' - v Ukraini", p.117-118; on p.120 appear three different translations of 5 lines of "Sadok vyshnevyi kolo khaty", i.e. "Beside the cottage cherry-trees are swinging", tr. by Herbert Marshall, "Beside the house, the cherry's flowering", tr. by Vera Rich, "A cherry grove beside the cottage stands", tr. by Andrusyshen/Kirkconnell; Shevchenko's "Zapovit (Iak umru, to pokhovaite)" is printed in full in Ukrainian on p.122, the first 8 lines are given in three translations, i.e. "My Testament (When I am dead, then bury me", tr. by John Weir, p.123, "When I die, then make my grave", tr. by Vera Rich, p.124, "When I shall die, pray let my bones", tr. by Andrusyshen/Kirkconnell, p.124.

A1295. Rudnytzky, Leonid. "'The spirit of great freedom'; thoughts on Oles' Honchar's novel The Cathedral." Mitteilungen (Arbeits- und Förderungsgemeinschaft der Ukrainischen Wissenschaften). 15 (1978): 96-101.

An article about Oles' Honchar and his novel Sobor which serves as an introduction to the author's translation of excerpts from Sobor published in the same issue on pp.102- 125 [cf. T108]. Rudnytzky characterizes Sobor as "one of the most controversial works of contemporary Soviet Ukrainian literature", as one received "with great enthusiasm by both readers and critics", but also fiercely attacked by ideological specialists and Soviet party officials. Sobor, according to Rudnytzky, "by its treatment of freedom and its symbolic dimension, transcends limited regional or national confines and becomes a universal work of art."

A1296. "Russia commits new crimes in Ukraine: mass arrests and repressions to stifle dissent." ABN Correspondence. 23.2 (March-April 1972): 3-5. illus.

An unsigned news report about the arrests in the Ukrainian SSR in January 1972 of some one hundred intellectuals accused of "anti-Soviet propaganda and agitation". The article provides some biographical data about V. Chornovil, I. Dziuba, Ie. Sverstiuk, I. Svitlychnyi, I. Stasiv- Kalynets who are among the arrested. A photo of Iryna Stasiv-Kalynets with her husband the poet Ihor Kalynets' appears on p.5. A portrait of Ivan Svitlychnyi is on the front cover of this issue.

A1297. "Russians torture Ukrainian political prisoners." ABN Correspondence. 24.5 (September-October 1973): 39-40.

Some data on the current situation of some Soviet political prisoners, among them writers: V. Chornovil, V. Moroz, I. Kalynets, Mykola Plakhtoniuk [Plakhtonyuk].

A1298. "The Russified Skovoroda." ABN Correspondence. 23.4 (July-August 1972): 46.

According to this news item, there are no plans in the Ukrainian SSR to publish Skovoroda's works in a modern Ukrainian translation.

A1299. Rybak, Natan. "In the interests of all mankind." Soviet Literature. 9 (306) (1973): 134.

A writers' forum was organized by the journal Soviet Literature under the heading "Peace to All Peoples". According to an editorial note: "Soviet writers, like the rest of the Soviet people, warmly support their government's foreign policy..." Natan Rybak is the only Ukrainian writer participating, though he is not identified as Ukrainian or from Ukraine. Says Rybak: "The policy of peaceful coexistence carries within itself a heat charge capable of thawing any ice blockage."

A1300. Rybak, Natan. "Revolutionary traditions and literary progress." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.4 (April; 1969): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (18 February 1969): 3].

"Ideological and artistic positions of socialist realism oblige all of us to remember the didactic power of our literary output which is calculated to strengthen class and international awareness among its numerous readers.... our quests must be subordinated to high party ideals..." says Rybak in this address at the 3rd Plenum of Writers' Union of Ukraine Executive Board. The Digest's title: "Writer calls for communist vigilance in art."

A1301. Rybak, Natan. "The shore of winged dreams." Soviet Literature. 1 (358) (1978): 3-4.

An article to accompany the translation of Oles' Honchar's novel Shore of Love, the first part of which is published in the same issue. [cf. T114]. Honchar "is constantly developing as an artist", says Rybak, he "continues the tradition of his predecessors - the romantic-realistic school of the Ukrainian novel." In Rybak's view, Honchar "endeavors to reveal the inner world of his characters who are the builders of a new human society."

A1302. Rybak, Natan. "Under the banner of internationalism." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 14.3 (March 1970): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina 20 January 1970): 1].

In an address to the Fourth Plenum of the Executive Board of the Writers' Union of Ukraine, Rybak draws attention to the "negative" aspects of contacts with foreign writers' delegations and calls for a more militant posture of Soviet writers against what he calls "bourgeois propaganda". The title supplied by the Digest: "Rybak calls for militancy in literature".

A1303. "Rybak, Natak Samoylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 530.

Thirty-five lines of bio-bibliographical data about the writer Natan Rybak, born 1913.

A1304. Ryga, George. "A bard of the world's destitute." / George Ryga's speech at the banquet marking the 100th anniversary of Wasyl Stefanyk at the Macdonald Hall, Edmonton, May 12, 1971. Ukrainian Canadian. 24.539 (32) (September 1971): 28-30. ports.

Ryga speaks about Ukrainian influences on his own work and says about Vasyl Stefanyk: "Stefanyk emerged from a Ukrainian writer into a world writer, a bard of the destitute of the various nations and races." Includes a portrait of Ryga and of the Stefanyk monument.

A1305. "Ryl'skiy, Maksim Fadeyevich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 489.

Thirty-eight lines of bio-bibliographical data about Maksym Ryl's'kyi (b. 19 March 1895, d. 24 July 1964).

A1306. Ryl's'kyi, Maksym. "Masters of Soviet literature on socialist realism: Maxim Rylsky." Tr. by Peter Mann. Soviet Literature. 11 (1966): 140- 143.

Excerpts from a speech or an article whose source is not indicated. Says Ryl's'kyi: "... Art is advanced by those who seek and perhaps at times stumble, but not by those who consider that everything has already been discovered and who are satisfied with the achievements already gained. But I repeat: not all searchings and not all 'innovations' deserve resolute approval. Only that art is properly to be called art which does not paralyse the human soul and does not weaken the muscles, but fills man with strength and vigour, powerfully penetrates life, looks ahead into our communist future." According to Ryl's'kyi, "The national character and popular spirit of art cannot be reduced... to petty outward tokens, it lies deeper, rooted in the character of this or that nation moulded by centuries, evolved by history and economic development, depending to a certain extent on geographic conditions."

A1307. "Ryznykiv, Oleksiy Serhyovych [sic]." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 87.

Characterized as a writer. No date of birth is given. Six lines of data on known dissident activity.

A1308. "SL's opinion poll: Oles Gonchar." Soviet Literature. 5 (338) (1976): 120-121.

The question "What do you expect from the coming Congress?" is posed by the editors of the journal in anticipation of the 6th Congress of Soviet Writers to be held in June 1976. Oles Honchar, who is not identified as a Ukrainian writer, had this to say: "... the most interesting features of the congress may be quite unexpected, for literature, like every form of human creativity, attracts us above all by its unexpectedness, the freshness and vividness of its ideas and the beauty inherent in its newness."

A1309. Saciuk, Olena. "A comparative study of the cowboy, gaucho and kozak as protagonists in selected novels." / Saciuk Olena Hikawyj. Dissertation Abstracts International. 34.12 (June 1974): 7721-A.

An abstract of a 1973 PhD. dissertation at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Saciuk examines "the archetypal figure of the horseman" in Ukrainian, Spanish-American and English-American literatures. "...the cowboy, gaucho and kozak share a fundamental set of character traits which appear constantly in novels written about them", says Saciuk. "They are unquestionably courageous, freedom loving, independent, laconic, hospitable, stoical in accepting fate, pain, loneliness and death. They live in harmony with nature and eschew the ways and institutions of conventional society, whether in religion, marriage or the courts. The horsemen have their own code which regulates their behavior..." Of the Ukrainian kozak novels that Saciuk deals with are those by P. Kulish, D. Mordovets', Iu. Kosach, Z. Tulub, A. Kashchenko, S. Cherkasenko, O. Makovei, V. Malyk, L.Poltava and Iu. Radzykevych. The dissertation, 247 p. long, is available in print or on microfilm from University Microfilms International, order no. 74-12,170.

A1310. "Sadovskiy (real name: Tobilevich) Nikolay Karpovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 490-491.

Thirty lines of bio-bibliographical data about Mykola Sadovs'kyi, b. 6 March 1856, d. 7 February 1933. Sadovs'kyi, in addition to being an actor and stage director, was also the author of memoirs.

A1311. Sago, Mitch. "Script and scenes from the program of Festival 80." Script and narration by Mitch Sago. Ukrainian Canadian. 23.537 (58) (July/August 1971): 16-19.

"Festival 80" took place in Edmonton in May 1971 and was dedicated to the 80th anniversary of Ukrainian immigration to Canada. The festivities included also an unveiling of the monument to Vasyl Stefanyk on the occasion of the writer's 100th birth anniversary. Mitch Sago's script includes the text which combines the themes about Stefanyk and his works with scenes from the lives of Canadian Ukrainian immigrants. The main parts are entitled: The stone cross - Krakow station - Overnight camp - Ukrainian wedding. The scenes were presented at the festival by various groups of the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians from Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Calgary, etc.

A1312. Sak, Mykhailo. "The logic of the Odessa booksellers." / Mykhaylo Sak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.6 (June 1966): 26-27. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 April 1966): 4].

About the difficulty of finding Ukrainian books in Odessa book stores and the prejudice toward Ukrainian language among booksellers. See also the statement in response to this article about measures taken to correct the situation. ["Odessa stores promise to push Ukrainian books". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.7 (July 1966): 24. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (1 July 1966): 4].

A1313. "Saksaganskiy (real name: Tobilevich) Panas Karpovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 491-492.

Bio-bibliographical data (32 lines) about Panas Saksahan'skyi, actor, stage director, author of comedies and books about the theater. The dates of birth and death are given as 15 May 1859, 17 September 1940.

A1314. "Samiilenko, Vladimir Ivanovich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 22 (1979): 578. Biblio.

Volodymyr Samiilenko (1864-1925), according to GSE, "was well known for his satirical feuilletons and pamphlets in verse. He caustically ridiculed the pseudopatriotism of the Ukrainian nationalists and liberals..." (20 lines).

A1315. "Sapelyak, Stepan Yevstafiyevych." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 87-88.

Nine lines about dissident activity of Stepan Sapeliak, born 1952. No mention of his being a poet.

A1316. Sapiets, Janis. "Hope dwindling for defiant Ukrainian." Ukrainian Review (London). 21.4 (Winter 1974): 54-55.

Comments by a BBC correspondent dated 18 October 1974 about the news of Valentyn Moroz's hunger strike in a Soviet prison. "The imprisonment of a writer for his political convictions under conditions which may lead to his death is a bad advertisement for any country," says Sapiets.

A1317. "Sara Karig reporting!" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.2 (February 1972): 7-8. [Full text. Original in Literaturna Ukraina. 31 December 1971: 3].

Sara Karig, senior editor of Europa Publishing House in Budapest, brought with her on her recent trip to Ukraine a newly published Hungarian edition of Lesia Ukrainka's selected works. She spoke about works of Ukrainian literature already published or about to be published in Hungarian translations, such as Kotsiubynskyi's Fata Morgana, Iurii Shcherbak's Transplantatsiia and Z khroniky mista Iaropola, an anthology of Ukrainian poetry and translations of Skovoroda to be issued on his 250th birth anniversary. The Digest's title reads: "Ukrainian literature in Hungary. Latest translations and future plans."

A1318. Savaryn, Mykhajlo. "Why capitulate? Ivan Dziuba's trauma." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 2.2 (Fall 1977): 54-61.

A polemic around Ivan Dziuba's book Internationalism or Russification and Dziuba's subsequent recantation of his views under Soviet pressure.

A1319. Sawczuk, Konstantyn. "Resistance in 'The Beria Reservation': the case of Valentyn Moroz." Ukrainian Quarterly. 34.1 (Spring 1978): 54- 60.

A discussion of two dissident works of Valentyn Moroz: "Amidst the snows" and "A chronicle of resistance" - polemical essays in Ukrainian which have become available in the West.

A1320. Sawczuk, Konstantyn. "Valentyn Moroz: a voice of the Ukrainian national renaissance." Nationalities Papers. 1.2 (Summer 1973): 1-9. Biblio. notes.

Valentyn Moroz, who was a Soviet prisoner at the time of this article's publication, is the author of poetry and other literary works, but is better known for his political and historical writings. Sawczuk provides some biographical data about Moroz and analyzes his non-literary works. This article and the one by L.M. Tikos [cf. A1563] are subject to critical comments by Ihor Kamenetsky and Andris Skreija published in the same issue.

A1321. "Scenes from The Ballad of Hryts, Oi ne khody Hrytsiu, tai na vechernytsi, by Mikhailo Starytsky, as presented by Theatre 100 and the Cultural Forces of the AUUC in Winnipeg." Ukrainian Canadian. 24.546 (39) (April 1972): 20- 21. illus.

Six photographs from the production of the musical drama in five acts, produced at the Ukrainian Labour Temple on Sunday, 27 February 1972 and directed by Anna Semenova. The unsigned note says: "The capacity audience represented a broad spectrum of the Ukrainian Canadian community and their enthusiasm testified to the desire and need to revive the Ukrainian theatre in Canada". AUUC refers to the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians.

A1322. "Scenes from Zakhar Berkut". Ukrainian Canadian.. 24.248 (41) (June 1972): 37. illus.

Two photographs from the Soviet film "Zakhar Berkut" based on Ivan Franko's novel. The brief note mentions the main actors: Wasyl Symchich, Ivan Havriliuk, Kost Stepanov, Antonina Leftiy, but does not name the director of the film.

A1323. Schneider, Lisa E. "An examination of Shevchenko's romanticism." Journal of Ukrainian Graduate Studies. 3.1 (Spring 1978): 5-28.

The author takes issue with some accepted views of Shevchenko scholars and claims that "in the early Kobzar, Shevchenko did operate within the most basic critical tenets of the Romantic movement - the importance of love, emotionalism, national consciousness, folk speech and culture, and attention to history - but he did so in a way that is rooted in 'real' experience, framed in a universal context, because his social responsibility as a writer was the most vital aspect of his creation of 'literature'. The Western Romantic writers, in contrast... were set free, by the fact that their culture was already firmly 'literary', to make their work a translation into art not of universal experience, but of personal, private experience; therefore, Western Romantic writers became idiosyncratic and extreme with regard to the same aspects of style which cause Shevchenko to appear as a 'Romantic realist' because of his faultless sensitivity to his own situation. In short, western-European Romantic literature can be thought of as personal experience universalized, while Shevchenko's poetry represents universal experience made personal, and thus made 'real'. Schneider discusses Shevchenko's poetry in a comparative context, especially in connection with the poetry of the English Romantic poets: Sir Walter Scott, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth.

A1324. "Sci-fi: reality & fiction." Ukraine. 2(38) (1979): 9,13.

"During the past few years Ukrainian science fiction has seen the emergence of a number of interesting authors in this genre, among them Olexandr Teslenko, Leonid Panasenko, Olexandr Meyerov and Vasil Holovachov," claims the unsigned article. "Significantly, their concerns revolve not so much around the machinery and technology of the future, as around the man of the future and his interrelation with the world of machines he has developed," says the anonymous author and discusses the science fiction works of the four writers in greater detail.

A1325. Sciacca, Frank. "The lives of Borys and Hlib." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1977-1978. 8 (1977-1978): 26-28. Biblio.

Summary of the seminar held on 17 November 1977 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker, an associate of Columbia University, claimed that the veneration of Borys and Hlib, the two Kyivan princes who are frequently presented as "true Christian martyrs", appears to have originated in the eleventh century out of "purely pagan and dynastic ideologies".

A1326. "The scholar's great responsibility." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.3 (March 1974): 11-12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (29 January 1974): 2].

An expanded plenum of the Scientific Council was held at the Shevchenko Institute of Literature of the Academy of Sciences in Kyiv. No exact date is given. According to this report, the plenum was dedicated to the study of literature as interpreted in the light of the decisions of the 24th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. It was attended by heads of literature departments of all universities of Ukraine, as well as magazine editors and literary critics. The opening address was by M.Z. Shamota who spoke about "party-mindedness" and "directed harsh criticism at several negative tendecies that occur in evaluations of literary phenomena and processes..." O.V. Kylymnyk "severely criticized some erroneous assertions in the sixth volume of the academic History of Ukrainian literature." S. A. Kryzhanivs'kyi spoke of the "discordant phenomena in Soviet Ukrainian literature of the 1920's and 30's and of their occasionally incorrect appraisal." V.F. Vorobiov [Vorobyov], I.A.Lutsenko, Ye.P. Drahin and others also spoke at the plenum. The Digest's title: "Plenum examines negative tendencies in evaluating literary phenomena."

A1327. "Semenko, Mikhail Vasil'evich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 497.

Bio-bibliographical data (14 lines) about the poet Mykhail Semenko (b. 31 December 1892, d. in prison 24 October 1937).

A1328. "Senchenko, Ivan Yefimovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 546.

Thirty-one lines of bio-bibligraphical data about the writer Ivan Senchenko (born 1901).

A1329. "The sentence of Mykhailo Osadchy." Ukrainian Quarterly. 33.1 (Spring 1977): 79-83.

Text of the official court decision (Ministry of Justice of the Ukrainian SSR. Case no.208 for 1972) issued by the Court Collegium on Criminal Affairs of the Lviv District Court on 5 September 1972 with judge I. Khomiuk presiding. The document, smuggled from Ukraine and translated from the Russian language, summarizes the case against Ukrainian writer Mykhailo Osadchyi who was sentenced to seven years of imprisonment at hard labor and three years of exile. He was sentenced to this punishment, according to this official document, for "anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda", for writing and giving to his friends poems which "contain slanderous inventions against the Soviet state and social order", for keeping in his possession "poems of anti-Soviet character" written by others, for writing the novel Bil'mo "with the purpose of besmirching the Soviet reality", etc.

A1330. "Senyk, Iryna Mykhaylivna." Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 89. port.

Eleven lines about the dissident activities of Iryna Senyk, born 1925. The fact that she is a poet is not mentioned.

A1331. Sergeyeva, Irina. "From twenty-two languages." Tr. by Yuri Sdobnikov. Soviet Literature. 9 (243) (1968): 175-179.

Abridged translation of an interview with Mykola Lukash, published originally in Russian in Literaturnaya Gazeta (29 May 1968). Mykola Lukash a Ukrainian translator of Goethe (Dr. Faustus), Bocaccio (Decameron), Cervantes (Don Quixote), Lorca, Mickiewicz, Verlaine and other writers, talks about how he became a translator. This issue of the journal is devoted to Ukrainian literature and art.

A1332. Serman, I.Z. "Prokopovich, Feofan." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 21 (1978): 260-261. Biblio.

A half-page article on Teofan Prokopovych (1681-1736). According to Serman, Prokopovych "wrote Russian and Latin verse, but his greatest influence on contemporary literature was as a preacher". "As one of the best-educated men of his time", says Serman, "he gave immediate and resolute support to Peter I's reform work."

A1333. Ševčenko, Ihor. "Ljubomudrejšij Kyr Agapit Diakon: On a Kiev edition of a Byzantine Mirror of Princes." Recenzija. 5.1 (Fall-Winter 1974): Suppl. 1-32, plus facsimile i-xxxi.

The first Slavonic printed version of Agapetus, the Byzantine author of The Mirror of Princes, according to Ševčenko - a book "exalting the Emporor's Divine might, setting some limits to it, and giving him advice" - was published in Kyiv in 1628. Ševčenko provides a detailed scholarly analysis of this edition and supplies the facsimile of the original. "...Agapetus' heyday came after the fall of Byzantium...", says Ševčenko, and "the first printed edition of the Slavic Agapetus... was just one more text of a Greek author who, for over a century, had been popular in the West."

A1334. Ševčenko, Ihor. "On some sources of Prince Svjatoslav's Izbornik of the year 1076." Orbis Scriptus: Dmitrij Tschižewskij zum 70. Geburtstag. Hrsg. von Dietrich Gerhardt, Wiktor Weintraub, Hans- Jürgen zum Winkel. München: Wilhelm Fink, 1966. 723-738.

According to Ihor Ševčenko, Prince Sviatoslav's Izbornik - "a miscellany comprising didactic, gnomic, spiritual, and moralistic pieces" - copied during the rule of Sviatoslav, the Grand Prince of Kyiv, is "the third oldest dated manuscript that has come down to us from the East Slavic area." The oldest one, Sviatoslav's Izbornik of the year 1073, in Ševčenko's view, "presents no problem of originality: we know at least two Greek miscellaneous manuscripts whose contents correspond to the Izbornik of 1073 almost word by word. In the case of Izbornik of 1076, however, the situation is much more complicated: unlike the older Izbornik from 1073, the 1076 Izbornik was believed to contain some original material, "since no Greek models have been hitherto adduced for a sizable portion of this collection." As a consequence, the Izbornik of 1076 was used by scholars to evaluate "the original literary style of the Kievan period" and to describe "the autochthonous elements in Kievan social and political thought". The scholars used for this purpose one of Izbornik 1076 chapters Nakazaniie bogatym' or "Admonition to the rich". Ihor Ševčenko presents relevant passages from this Admonition from the Izbornik and confronts them with passages from "Hortatory chapters, a kind of Mirror of Princes which Deacon Agapetus... addressed to Emperor Justinian (527-565)" and which was part of the Moscow Synodal Library collection. The author makes a side by side comparison of the relevant texts from Izbornik 1076, the manuscript from the Synodal Library and the original Greek text of Agapetus and concludes that the Izbornik's version is not a direct translation from the Greek of Agapetus, but an adaptation of one of its Slavic translations.

A1335. "7th [i.e. Seventh] Congress of Ukraine's Writers. Discussion following the reports of the Executive Board of the Union of Writers of Ukraine and of the Auditing Commission of the UWU." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 22-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 6-8].

Brief excerpts of speeches by Rostyslav Bratun', Iurii Zbanats'kyi [Yuriy Zbanats'kyy], A. Ya. Pashchenko and Stepan Oliinyk [Oliynyk]. Oliinyk, chairman of the mandate commission, provided some statistics about participants of the Seventh Congress of Writers. According to his report, 309 delegates were elected. Of these, there were 153 prose writers, 124 poets, 9 playwrights, 20 critics, 3 translators; by national composition: 244 were Ukrainians, 40 Russians, 20 Jews, 5 other nationalities; by age: 30 years of age and younger - 2 participants, 31-40 years - 52, 41-50 years - 59, 51-60 - 95, over 60 - 101. The oldest - 85-year old P. Panch, the youngest - 27 year old M. Lukov.

A1336. "7th [i.e. Seventh] Congress of Ukraine's Writers. The governing body of the Congress." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 15-16. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 2].

A listing by name of the membership of the presidium (58 names), the secretariat (13 names), the editorial commission (17 names) and the mandates commission (25 names) of the 7th Congress. The Digest's title: "Membership of Congress governing body".

A1337. "7th [i.e. Seventh] Congress of Ukraine's Writers. To the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. To the General Secretary of the CC CPSU, Comrade Leonid Illich Brezhnev." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 25-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 April 1976): 1].

Expressions of gratitude to the Politburo of the Communist Party of the USSR "for their steadfast solicitude for the blossoming of our multinational Soviet literature, of which Soviet Ukrainian literature, which is developing in fruitful interaction with the cultures of fraternal peoples of the Soviet Union and in indissoluble unity with the practice of communist building, is an integral element." The Digest's title: "Writers' Congress sends message to the CC CPSU and Brezhnev."

A1338. "7th [i.e.Seventh] Congress of Ukraine's Writers. To the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (20 April 1976): 1].

Expressions of loyalty to the Communist Party of Ukraine, on behalf of writers of Ukraine. The statement reads, among other things, as follows: "The poisonous seeds sown by the imperialist demagogues and their yes-men from the doomed ranks of the Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists, Zionists and various brands of revisionists will never take root in the healthy fields of Soviet Ukrainian literature luxuriantly thriving in the name of communism..." The Digest's title: "... and to the CCCPU" [cf. A1337].

A1339. "The Seventh Congress of the Writers of Ukraine. The agenda of the Congress." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 12. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 1].

According to this news item, the Congress was opened on 14 April in Kyiv by M.P. Bazhan. V. Shcherbyts'kyi and other leaders of the Communist Party of Ukraine and representatives from Moscow were elected to the presidium. The Digest's title: "Writers of Ukraine hold 7th Congress."

A1340. Seymour-Smith, Martin. "Western minor literatures." In his Funk & Wagnalls Guide to Modern World Literature. New York: Funk & Wagnalls [©1973]: 1113-1116.

Ukrainian literature is dealt with in section 1 of the chapter on minor Western literatures, together with the literatures of other republics of the USSR. The author provides a brief survey from Ivan Kotliarevskyi to Mykola Bazhan, with laconic characterizations for some selected writers (Shevchenko, Franko, Kotsiubyns'kyi, Stefanyk, Lesia Ukrainka, Khvylovyi, Tychyna, Ryl's'kyi, Semenko, Mykola Kulish, Korniichuk, Sosiura, Bazhan).

A1341. "Shabliovsky, Yevgeniy Stepanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 553.

A bio-bibliographical note of 41 lines about the literary scholar and critic Ievhen Shabliovs'kyi, born 1906.

A1342. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "The humanism of Shevchenko" / by Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian Canadian. 28.587 (80) (March 1976): 41-44. illus.

Excerpts from Chaper II of the book The Humanism of Shevchenko and Our Time, available in the English translation by Mary Skrypnyk. [cf. B080]. "The idea of the interconnection of the individual and society constitutes the leading creative principle in Shevchenko," says Shabliovs'kyi. "The individual appears in Shevchenko in conflict with the ruling society, not in the name of some personal aim, but as a representative of humanity, of the oppressed masses. In this lies his strength." The article is illustrated with a b/w portrait of Shevchenko by M. Murashko and with the following excerpts from his poetry: "Without a cowardly reproach" (9 lines), "The stars twinkle; in the sky" (8 lines), "Throughout ravine and mountainside" (11 lines), "How difficult to live on earth, yet one wants to live" (6 lines), translated by Mary Skrypnyk (p.42); "Asweeping freely o'er the steppes" (12 lines), (p.43), "...The dawn arrives", "The sky's edge bursts ablaze" (20 lines),(p.45), translated by John Weir.

A1343. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "The image of woman in the works of Shevchenko." Excerpt from Chapter 1 of the book "The humanism of Shevchenko in [sic] our time" by Yevhen Shabliovsky. Tr. by Mary Skrypnyk. Ukrainian Canadian. 24.545 (38) (March 1972): 58-62. illus.

About what the author calls "the unprecedently beautiful in its moral strength and purity, image of the toiling woman - maiden, sweatheart and mother" in Taras Shevchenko's poetry. Illustrated with a number of quotations in C.H. Andrusyshen & W. Kirkconnell, Olda Shartse, Irena Zheleznova and Herbert Marshall translations and with art work by N. Lopukhova, B. Shats, I.S. Izhakevich, O. Slastion, H.I. Beltsov. The longer poetic fragments are: The stars twinkle; in the sky (8 lines), Why a father, mother, why a home at all (10 lines), In servitude she grew (7 lines), From past Liman he brings the herds that bellow (8 lines), it is not an anemone (16 lines), My grey-haired father passed away (20 lines), She was to be a mother soon (9 lines), But no one heard it, no one knew (18 lines), The black-browed beauty wept her fill (8 lines), And when I die, my holy one, my friend (5 lines), And you received his living word (5 lines), In him who was thy son, the breath (12 lines), We are not his slaves - we're people! (5 lines), But suddenly she noticed - my dear Lord! (9 lines). For Shabliovs'kyi's book on Shevchenko see B080.

A1344. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "In struggle, passion and progress. On the 125th anniversary of the birth of Mykhaylo Drahomanov." / Yevhen Shabliovs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.11 (November 1966): 25-26. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 September 1966): 2-3].

Says Shabliovs'kyi, as translated by the Digest: "Mykhaylo Drahomanov played a leading progressive part in the development of Ukrainian culture and literature in the 1870s and 1880s and exercised a positive effect on the works of Ukrainian writers and critics. Drahomanov's appearances against reaction and conservatism in matter of national culture, against national narrowmindedness and nationalism, and in favor of unity between Ukrainian and Russian literature introduced a new and fresh trend into Ukrainian life." The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Drahomanov's 125th anniversary".

A1345. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages" / by Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian Canadian. 24.542 (36) (January 1972): 40- 43. illus.

The introductory chapter from Shabliovskyi's book of the same title [cf. B081] with a bio- bibliographical note and portrait of the author on p.41.

Says Shabliovs'kyi: "Ukrainian literature, as represented by its foremost writers, has always been imbued with the spirit of freedom and ardent patriotism... The factors forming the content of the national traditions are not isolated in their origin and development from the cultural life of other peoples... National identity of each literature is determined by the heritage of its finest, progressive traditions of classical literature, the traditions which represent the democratic and socialist elements of the spiritual culture of the past... The cultivation of antiquated elements of national forms, which are not in harmony with the content of the new life, may lead to the revival of nationalistic survivals and conservatism... The correct, historical elucidation of the cardinal aspects of the formation and development of our national literature is of great theoretical and practical importance."

A1346. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages. Ukrainian culture and folk creativity of the 16th and 17th centuries." / Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian Canadian. Pt. I. 24.544 (37) (February 1972): 34-39. illus. Pt. II. 24.545 (38) (March 1972): 65-67. illus.

In this segment Shabliovs'kyi discusses dumy and historical songs, Ivan Vyshens'kyi, religious polemic literature and the beginning of book printing. Says Shabliovs'kyi about dumy: "Despite the hyperbolism and loftiness of artistic imagery, the basis of the dumas and songs is a full bodied realistic portrayal of actual life, made the more impressive by its topicality and broad popular world outlook". He characterizes Ivan Vyshens'kyi as an "initiator of the satirical exposure trend which became typical of all subsequent Ukrainian literature". Of the polemic literature of the period Shabliovs'kyi says: "... Ukrainian polemic literature firmly stood guard over the interests of the people and fought as well as it could for their liberation from national oppression." For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a partial reprint see B081.

A1347. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages. Ukrainian literature and folklore of the 17th and 18th centuries." / Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian Canadian. Pt. I. 24.546 (39) (April 1972): 40-43, illus; Pt. II. 24.247 (40) (May 1972): 38-41; Pt.III and IV. 24.248 (41) (June 1972): 39-43, illus.; Pt.V. 24.249 (42) (July-August 1972): 38-41, illus.

Pt.I. discusses historical epic poetry, dumy and songs about Khmel'nyts'kyi, some dramatic works of the 18th century, lyrical songs by Marusia Churai. Included in the text are 8 lines of "Hey, the guelder-rose in the meadow" (p.40). Pt.II. concentrates on school dramas, mostly with religious-didactic content, but sometimes with patriotic and general social themes, on the intermedia or interludes which consisted of comic scenes from the everyday life of the people and on the puppet show - vertep. The latter, says Shabliovs'kyi, "played a great role in bringing literature closer to the masses." Pts. III and IV deal with folk songs, historical ballads, folklore reflecting the haidamaky rebellions and the opryshki uprisings. The following are longer quotes used as illustrations: "Far beyond the Danube wide" (12 lines; "There's noise, mother, noise (10 lines); "What's taking place upon the earth can hardly be described" (10 lines). Pt. V. focuses on Hryhorii Skovoroda who is characterized as a "genuine enlightener and democrat" who "introduced many new features into the poetic culture of Ukrainian letters." Skovoroda, according to Shabliovs'kyi, was "opposed to the scholastic stencils of versification, he did a great deal to establish new verse forms. He developed syllabic verse along the lines of tonalization, endeavoring to graft metric feet on it. The verse structure of Skovoroda's poetry is diversified, rich in its strophics and the rhymes are sometimes of impressive grandeur." Eight lines of a poem "On the hill a maple stands" are quoted on p.40. For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a partial reprint see B081.

A1348. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages. Ukrainian literature of the pre-Shevchenko period." / by Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian Canadian. Pt.I. 25.550 (43) (September 1972): 36-41, illus.; Pt.II & III. 25.551 (44) (October 1972): 38-42, illus., ports. of Kvitka and Hulak-Artemovs'kyi; Pt.IV. 25.552 (45) (November 1972): 37-40, illus., portrait of Shashkevych on p.39.

Pt.I is devoted to Ivan Kotliarevs'kyi (Kotlyarevsky in text). "In his Aeneid Kotlyarevsky continued the tradition of both the ancient Ukrainian burlesque and the Russian mock-heroic poems", says Shabliovs'kyi, "he joined the two, and at the same time introduced new features into the burlesque. In its character and manner of writing, however, it did not fit into the traditional frames of the burlesque, for it marked the beginning of a new creative trend in Ukrainian letters - realism." In "Natalka-Poltavka", according to Shabliovs'kyi, Kotliarevs'kyi "showed the socio-psychological life of common people and disclosed important aspects of the national character." Parts II. and III. discuss the work of Hryhorii Kvitka-Osnovianenko [Osnovyanenko], Petro Hulak-Artemovs'kyi, Ievhen Hrebinka and Levko Borovykovs'kyi [Borovikovsky]. Shabliovs'kyi characterizes Kvitka-Osnovianenko as a "gifted innovator, the founder of Ukrainian prose" who paid "a great deal of attention to the depiction of the life of his times, painting pictures in whiuch social motifs stand out fairly prominent against the truthfully presented details of everyday life." Part IV. focuses on the literature of Western Ukraine, especially on the works of Markiian Shashkevych, Iakiv Holovats'kyi [Holovatsky] and Ivan Vahylevych [Vahilevich] and the beginnings of romanticism. Eight lines of Shashkevych's poem "Slovo do chtiteliv ruskoho yazika", i.e. "To those who respect the Rus language (So join hands, my youthful friends)" are quoted on p. 38.

Shabliovs'kyi's conclusion about the period: "... the strength of Ukrainian literature of the pre-Shevchenko period was inherent in the foundation on which it was shaped and grew, i.e. in its democracy and humanism, the extensive use of the wealth of folklore and the popular language. Its weakness lay in the narrowness of its ideological and artistic scope, in the vagueness of its prospects of development. This conditioned the more or less pronounced elements of empiricism and schematism combined with moralizing and didacticism which were to be found even in some of the outstanding works of the period." For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a partial reprint see B081.

A1349. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages / by Yevhen Shabliovsky. Taras Shevchenko - founder of the new Ukrainian literature." [Pt.I.] Ukrainian Canadian. 25.553 (46) (December 1972): 39-41, port.; Pt.II. 25.554 (47) (January 1973): 38-41. illus.; Pt.III. 25.555 (48) (February 1973): 83-86. illus.; Pt.IV. 25.556 (49) (March 1973): 38-42, illus.; Pt.V. 25.557 (50) (April 1973): 38-41. illus. port.

Pt.I. discusses Shevchenko's life and work in chronological order. Says Shabliovs'kyi about Shevchenko: "Shevchenko is justifiably considered one of the greatest humanist writers of all times... It would be difficult to find a writer in world literature comparable to Shevchenko in his importance to his people and his nation." Illustrated with a photo of the wooden sculpture of Shevchenko by I.S. Znova (1958).

Pt.II. discusses Shevchenko's prose and his later poems. Says Shabliovs'kyi: "Taras Shevchenko was a brilliant poet and an unsurpassed master of the literary art. His poetry is characterized by highly artistic principled content and by a richness of themes, genres and motifs. The power of Shevchenko's writing is explained, above all, by the fact that it propagated the great truth of life and a firm belief in its revival on the basis of humanism. Prior to Shevchenko, no one in Ukrainian literature presented such a profound and truthful portrayal [sic] of life and such a consistent and revolutionary judgement of contemporary reality."

Pt.III. discusses the patriotic fervor of Shevchenko's poetry, "the motif of protest and indignation", his contacts with Russian writers, the theme of humanism in his works.

Pt.IV (mistakenly entitled "Ukrainian literature of the pre-Shevchenko period) discusses Shevcheno's world-view. Says Shabliovs'kyi: "According to Shevchenko's moral and ethic convictions, love for mankind, sincerity, mutual aid and friendship were the main criteria of a person's values". "Shevchenko's easthetics glorify man, but while praising him, it also shows him how to become more fully and more deeply conscious of reality and how to fight successfully for the establishment of a truly human life on earth." According to the author, "Shevchenko's satire proved that the evils which it castigated were rooted not in the character and conduct of individuals, but in the political and social order. The exposure of social evil is united with a direct revolutionary call to uproot it." Longer quotations of Shevchenko's poetry in Pt.IV include: "You won't escape! You cannot find yourselves a cover" (12 lines), "Then land and lake with life will teem" (12 lines), "The smallest fry" (7 lines), "...'Twas nearing dawn" (6 lines).

Pt.V. is a general appraisal of Shevchenko's poetry and his role in Ukrainian and world literature. Says Shabliovs'kyi: "Shevchenko's poetry testifies to the immense possibilities of lyricism in the portrayal or reality. In all genres of his poetry Shevchenko is above all a lyricist, who seethes, rages, interposes, weeps, condemns, appeals, and finally acts as the main hero of his poems, ballads, lyrical plays and even short stories. His lyrical brilliance was truly all-pervading and all-embracing." Illustrated with a b/w reproduction of an oil portrait of Shevchenko by K.D. Trokhimenko, dated 1963/64. For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a reprint see B081.

A1350. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages"/ Yevhen Shabliovsky. Ukrainian literature after Shevchenko." Pt.I. Ukrainian Canadian. 25.558 (51) (May 1973): 38-41. ports.; Pt.II. 25.559 (52) (June 1973): 36-40, ports.; Pt.III. 25.560 (53) (July/August 1973): 39-41; Pt.IV. 25.561 (54) (September 1973): 39-42, illus.; Pt.V. [designated as pt.VII]. 25.562 (55) (October 1973): 38-41. illus., ports.; Pt.VI. [designated as Pt.VII]. 25.563 (56) (November 1973): 37-41. illus., port.; Pt.VII.[designated as VIII.] 25.564 (57) (December 1973): 38-42. illus., port.; Pt.VIII. [designated as Pt.X.]. 25.565 (58) (January 1974): 40-42. illus.; Pt. IX. [designated as Pt.XI.]. 25.566 (59) (February 1974): 37-40. port.; Pt.X [designated as Pt.XII.] 25.567 (60) (March 1974): 29-31.

Pt.I. discusses Marko Vovchok ("The democratic, simple and comprehensible language of the richness of folklore-poetic elements in the author's writings were organically linked with the anti-serfdom tendency of her stories," says Shabliovskyi), Anatolii Svydnyts'kyi [Anatole Svidnitsky] (the novel "The Luboratskys" is characterized as "one of the best works of Ukrainian prose of the 1860's and an important achievement of critical realism"), Stepan Rudans'kyi [Rudansky] (who, according to Shabliovs'kyi, established an original genre in Ukrainian literature - spivomovka - "Humorous miniature verse based on folk wisdom, folklore anecdotes and sharp folk witticisms"), Leonid Hlibov (whose fables and lyrical poetry, according to Shabliovs'kyi, "are noted for their highly cultured verse, the wealth of artistic technique and rhytmic and tonal diversity") and Iurii Fed'kovych [Yuri Fedkovich] [who, says Shabliovs'kyi "glorified the sense of human dignity in the people"), et al. Portrait of Hlibov appears on p.41.

Pt.II. discusses Panas Myrnyi ("Panas Mirny's realistic description of mass scenes and broad public events, in which the interests of various social groups and layers converged, was a new thing in Ukrainian prose; Ivan Nechui-Levyts'kyi [Levitsky] (in Mykola Dzeriia "the author embodied the characteristic traits of the oppressed people, the most important of which were the fortitude and bravery displayed in their struggle for freedom."); Mykhailo Staryts'kyi [Mikhailo Staritsky] who, according to Shabliovs'kyi, "broadened the thematic horizons of Ukrainian literature and strengthened the principle of artistic realism in it") and Ivan Mandzura (who "resolutely attacked the idealization of the Ukrainian past". Shabliovskyi discusses also the prohibition of Ukrainian printing and the policy of national oppression by the czarist Russian government. This part includes b/w portraits of Nechui-Levyts'kyi and Staryts'kyi.

Pt.III.: "Measures of forced assimilation," says Shabliovs'kyi, "evoked considerable resistance on the part of the nationally oppressed masses and led to displays of national alienation and animosity. The nationalist camp in all ways fanned the flames of national mistrust..." M. Drahomanov "came out in defense of the national rights of the Ukrainians, exposed the czarist policy of oppression, and censured Ukrainian nationalism. At the 1878 International Literary Congress in Paris, says Shabliovskyi, Drahomanov "presented a truthful picture of the appalling conditions in which Ukrainian literature found itself in czarist Russia". In this part Shabliovs'kyi discusses "the revolutionary-democratic" writers and critics: Drahomanov, Ivan Bilyk (Rudchenko), Franko, Pavlyk, Ostap Terlets'kyi [Terletsky], Oleksandr Navrots'kyi [Olexandr Navrotsky], Serhii Podolyns'kyi [Serhiy Podolinsky]. P. Kulish, Iakiv Shchoholiv, O. Konys'kyi [Konisky], B. Hrinchenko, M. Voronyi [Vorony], Oles', P. Karmans'kyi [Karmansky], V. Samiilenko [Samiylenko] are mentioned as writers who did not base themselves on revolutionary positions, but whose writings were of literary and cultural value nonetheless." Eight lines of the poem "Vorsklo (I have seen the strong insanely)" by Shchoholiv are quoted in the text on p.40.

Pt.IV. discusses primarily Ivan Franko and Lesia Ukrainka. Says Shabliovs'kyi: "Franko's influence on Ukrainian literature and culture was immense and comparable only to Shevchenko's....[His] "social, political and national views were the fruit of his deep, consistent democratism." Lesia Ukrainka is characterized by Shabliovs'kyi as "one of the most brilliant writers of Ukraine, the author of deeply philosophical dramatic poems and lyrical verse." Excerpts from Franko's and L. Ukrainka's poetry are quoted in the text, as follows: Franko: "Your patriotic feelings" (8 lines, p.39); "To a new kind of war we were marching" (8 lines, p.40); Of that great blazing floodtide are you frightened" (11 lines, p.40); "The thunder rolls! Hearts thrill with agitation" (6 lines, p.40); Lesia Ukrainka: "Ukraine has often seen the kind" (8 lines, p.39); "We paralitics are with gleaming eyes" (8 lines, p.41).

Pt. V (i.e. Oct. 1973): This section deals mainly with the patriotic sentiment in Ukrainian letters. "The deeper the feeling of patriotism became and the more essentially it reflected the aspirations of the people, the more sharply it contradicted the existing oppressors' system", says Shabliovs'kyi and discusses the work of P. Hrabovs'kyi [Hrabovsky], L. Ukrainka, V. Stefanyk, O. Kobylians'ka, M. Cheremshyna [Cheremshina], M. Kotsiubyns'kyi [Kotsyu- binsky]. Portraits of Fed'kovych appear on p.39, of Cheremshyna on p. 41.

Pt.VI. (i.e. Nov. 1973): "Patriotic tendencies and ardent humanism in Ukrainian literature are organically connected with its heartfelt lyricism," says Shabliovs'kyi. "Lyricism pervades all the genres of Ukrainian literature. It is expressed in drama, satire, historical and social novels." The following quotations of Franko's poetry appear in text: "It's midnight. Silence. Cold. The wind is howling" (13 lines, pp.37-38); "My mind is troubled by disturbing thoughts" (8 lines, p.38); "Can it then be that all those hearts that flamed" (5 lines, p.38); "You do not flog or to Siberia drive" (6 lines, p.38). The second section of this part deals with prose and drama, focusing on V. Stefanyk and M. Staryts'kyi [Staritsky]. Portrait of Franko (a sculpture by H.Pivovarov) is on p.39.

Pt.VII. (i.e.Dec. 1973): Mostly about the plays of Ivan Karpenko-Karyi [Kary, Tobilevich] and dramatic poems and dramas of Lesia Ukrainka. Late 19th and early 20th century literature, according to Shabliovs'kyi, "was complicated by the appearance of various decadent streams within it. Abandonment of the principles of reflection of the people's interests and aspirations, and reluctance to regard the arts as an instrument in serving the progressive ideals of humanity, were the main points uniting the various 'advocates' of those trends. Behind their 'symbolism' and appeals to 'eternal beauty' and 'boundless horizons' there lay internal futility, hypocrisy and groundlessness." says Shabliovs'kyi. "With the intensification of the proletariat's revolutionary struggle, the Ukrainian bourgeois writers - modernists, pessimists and decadents of all sorts - grouped into one camp, virtually opposing the development of a truly national culture of the Ukrainian people. As the revolutionary struggle gathered momentum, all these false 'songsters of beauty' were exposed. And not only was their social countenance unmasked, but their esthetic helplessness and incompetence were revealed in all their nakedness," says Shabliovs'kyi. Portrait of Karpenko-Karyi is on p.39 of this issue.

Pt.VIII. (i.e.Jan.1974): This section discusses the early 20th century prose of Franko, Martovych, Stefanyk, Teslenko, Vasylchenko [Vasilchenko], Kotsiubyns'kyi [Kotsyubinsky]. A poem fragment by Franko is quoted on p.40 ("Monoloh ateista (This world, where hitherto we've lived as guests) (9 lines).

Pt.IX (Feb.1974): About the peasant theme in Ukrainian literature, the social novel and the influences of Marxism. Portrait of Marko Vovchok on p.39.

Pt. X. (March 1974 ): About the faith in a better life to come expressed in pre- revolutionary writings. Six lines of Franko's poem "I thought of the new human brotherhood's birth" are printed on p.30. For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a reprint see B081.

A1351. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "Ukrainian literature through the ages. / Yevhen Shabliovsky. "Soviet Ukrainian literature". Ukrainian Canadian. [Pt.I]. 26.568 (61) (April 1974): 31-33; [Pt.II: no.569 NOT SEEN]; [Pt.III. 26.570 (63) (June 1974); 38-41. port. ; [Pt.IV.] 26.571 (64) (July/August 1974): 38-41. ports.; [Pt.V]. 27.572 (65) (September 1974): 40-41, no illus.; [Pt.VI]. 27.573 (66) (October 1974); 35-37. port. [Pt.VII.] (conclusion). 27.574 (67) (November 1974): 38-40. ports.

[Pt.I] (April 1974) deals with the early years after the 1917 Revolution. Says the author: "The Leninist nationalities policy gave the Ukrainian people the opportunity to realize their ages-old dream of national revival."

[Pt.II, no.569, May 1974, issue not available];

[Pt.III. June 1974] with portrait of Dovzhenko on p.41. Here Shabliovs'kyi discusses Soviet patriotism in literature, "joyous optimistic motifs" and says, in part, "... Soviet letters are infused with vital asserting ethos and a feeling of pride in the free man". There are a number of poetry quotations in text: Tychyna: "Row on row the workers stride" (8 lines, p.38); Ellan-Blakytnyi [Blakitny]: "Ranok (Ours this day that cheers and braces" (8 lines, p.38); Tychyna: "I am the people and my truth-born power" (8 lines, p.38, trans. of "Ia utverdzhaius'"), Ryl's'kyi [Rylsky]: "What hearts you've tempered in your forge (7 lines, p.38); For me my country is Lenin's appeal (6 lines, p.39); Oles': "You're really loyal, no-one's truer" (6 lines, p.39); Malyshko: "You lay there huddled, woebegone and weak" (11 lines, p.41, tr. of "Tse bulo na svitanku").

[Pt.IV.] July/August 1974: Says Shabliovs'kyi: "Developing along the lines of socialist realism, Soviet Ukrainian literature is attaining an inimitable and original character.... Ukrainian literature is represented by a galaxy of striking individualities, whose aim is to give a highly artistic reflection of the truth of life and the psychology of modern man." Shabliovs'kyi characterizes Tychyna ("His philosophical meditations and the musicality of verse organically blend with folk melodies"), Ryl's'kyi ("displayed profound lyricism, wise and sunny optimism and love of his people"), Iurii Ianovs'kyi [Yuri Yanovsky] ("highly prolific innovations and quests"), Olexandr Dovzhenko ("forceful symbolism, heroic perception of the world, penetrating understanding of the Soviet people and their lofty mission on the earth..."), Volodymyr Sosiura [Volodimir Sosyura] ("His poetry is replete with a rainbow-like idiom; it is permeated with a feeling of joy, love of life and the beauty of Soviet reality"), Ivan Mykytenko [Mikitenko] ("had a tremendous bearing on the education of a socialist consciousness in the people"), Oleksandr Korniichuk [Olexandr Korniychuk] ("The potency of Korniychuk's personages lies in their national roots and their revolutionary optimism"), Andriy Holovko ("Truthful portrayals of complex social processes..."), Petro Panch ("one of the gifted initiators of Soviet literature to depict the joys of emancipated labour..."), Iurii Smolych [Yuri Smolich] ("a much read writer both at home and abroad"), Ivan Le (whose "monumental novels", in the author's view, are "among the finest works of Soviet historical fiction"), Leonid Pervomais'kyi [Pervomaisky] (whose poetry books, says Shabliovs'kyi, "have won wide acclaim" and the novel Dykyi med is "an important contribution to the development of modern Ukrainian prose.") The chapter is interspersed with poetry excerpts: Ryl's'kyi: "We're building bridges in the world" (5 lines, p.39); Sosiura: "Amid sister nations as ages proceed" (8 lines from "Love Ukraine" on pp.39-40); *** (Above the buzy cranes and trucks", 4 stanzas on p.41, tr. by Dorian Rottenberg. Portraits of Tychyna appear on p.39, of Ianovskyi and Korniichuk on p.40, of Sosiura on p.41.

[Pt.V.] September 1974 issue discusses socialist realism, heroic element, optimism, assertive character and humanism in literature as exemplified in the works of O. Honchar, M. Stel'makh, M. Bazhan, A. Malyshko.

[Pt.VI] October 1974. Here Shabliovs'kyi writes about the musicality, the song element in Ukrainian literature, as well as about the Soviet Ukrainian humour and satire. The portrait of Ostap Vyshnia appears on p.37.

[Pt.VII] (November 1974 issue). In the concluding part Shabliovs'kyi's focus is on what he calls "the creative cooperation of peoples under socialism" and the "favourable mutual influence of the Soviet Ukrainian and Russian literatures". The chapter is illustrated with b/w portraits of O. Honchar (p.39) and M. Ryl's'kyi (p.40). Ryl's'kyi's poem beginning "And to that Cossack ballad as they listened" (18 lines) is quoted in an unattributed translation on pp.38-39. For Shabliovs'kyi's book of which this is a reprint see B081.

A1352. Shabliovs'kyi, Ievhen. "We are advancing with dignity" / Yevhen Shabliovs'kyy. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.9 (September 1973): 9-10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (31 July 1973):4].

"The internationalist essence of our literature organically includes irreconcilable struggle against all enemy concepts, especially bourgeois nationalism...", says Shabliovs'kyi, "... exaggeration of the national, accentuation of our 'exclusiveness' is very much to the taste of our class enemies abroad..." The Digest's title: "Writers exhorted to remember their internationalist tasks".

A1353. "Shadows of our forgotten ancestors: Ukraine's prizewinning film." Forum. 8 (Spring 1969): 20. illus.

An unsigned note about the 1964 film by Serhii Paradzhanov (Serhi Parayanov in text) based on a novel by Mykhailo Kotsiubyns'kyi. The note calls attention to a 10-page article about the film in New York's Film Comment (Fall 1968). Apparently there is an article "Perpetual motion" by Parayanov (pp.40-48), plus notes and introduction by Steven P. Hill (pp.38-39). "Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors" is one of the most unorthodox, colorful, formalistic (arty), religious-superstitious and sensual-erotic films ever made in the Soviet Union... Winner at Mar del Plata and talk of other (non-competition) festivals, the film has proved a sensation both outside and inside the USSR..." says Steven Hill.

A1354. "Shaginyan, Marietta Sergeevna." World Who's Who of Women. 4th ed. (1978): 1059-1060.

Thirty-two lines of bio-bibliographical data about the Armenian born Russian writer (b. 1888), author of a literary study of Taras Shevchenko. [No portrait].

A1355. "Shakhovsky, Semen Mikhaylovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 555.

Bio-bibliographical data about the literary critic and scholar Semen Shakhovs'kyi, born 1909 (28 lines).

A1356. Shakhovs'kyi, Semen. "Poetry of a Promethean spirit."/ Semen Shakhovsky. Ukraine. 4(24) (1975): 16.

An article about Lesia Ukrainka on the occasion of the appearance of Shakhovs'kyi's book Lesya Ukraïnka: a biographical sketch [cf. B082]. The article stresses Lesia Ukrainka's internationalism, true appreciation of her work by the public in Soviet times, the various celebrations of the centenary of her birth in the USSR. Illustrated with a reproduction of the book's title page and L. Ukrainka's portrait from the book's frontispiece. It is not clear whether the article is a reprint from the book's introduction or an unsigned article on the occasion of the book's publication.

A1357. "Shamot [sic], Nikolay Zakharovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 555.

A forty-line bio-bibliographical note about Mykola Shamota, literary critic and scholar born 1916.

A1358. Shamota, Mykola. "For a concretely historical depiction of life in literature" / M.Z. Shamota. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.7 (July 1973): 15-24. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Komunist Ukrainy. 5 (May 1973): 77-95].

The Digest's title: "Shamota spells out party directives on literature to writers and critics". "A Marxist-Leninist understands that in a class society and in a situation in which two opposing worlds coexist, a historical approach to the phenomena and processes of life means a class approach, and that truth in the analysis of these phenomena and processes is reached only through proletarian, communist party-mindedness (partiynist)," says Shamota. He interprets these precepts by listing the principles on which literature should be based, i.e. it should have "an interest in objects and concepts connected with the socialist way of life"; it should give "dilligent and constant attention to the achievements of the people"; it must show "interest in all manifestations of Soviet patriotism and Socialist internationalism". "Loyal to the great cause of communist construction, which unites all of our peoples, enamored of our socialist Homeland, imbued with the spirit of Soviet patriotism, our literature has always angrily and contemptuously condemned all vestiges of national narrowmindedness, conflict, suspiction, jealousy, national conceit and egocentrism..." says Shamota. The following writers and critics are singled out for adverse criticism, with their ideological mistakes or weaknesses pointed out in some detail: S. Telniuk [Telnyuk], Ievhen Hutsalo, H. Syvokin', V. Donchyk, V. Bazylivs'kyi [Bazylivs'kyy], Leonid Horlach, Alla Tiutiunnyk [Tyutyunnyk], Hryhir Tiutiunnyk [Tyutyunnyk], M. Rudenko, Ie. Meihesh [Ye. Meyhesh], Roman Fedoriv, Iu. Kolisnychenko, S. Plachynda, I. Bilyk, Iu. Smolych and V. Iaremenko [Yaremenko]. They are accused of "lack of social consciousness", of concentrating on peasant themes and on the past, of "insulting allusions addressed to our northern neighbors", etc. "The time has come to put an end to liberalism, its methodology and its phraseology", says Shamota.

A1359. Shamota, Mykola. "On the humanism of socialist realism". Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.6 (June 1974): 11-14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (19 April 1974): 3].

Says Shamota: "The socialist conception of personality and socialist humanism begets at least two key features of socialist realism as an artistic method and as a socialist esthetic reality. These are, first of all, continual concern and respect for the working people, a determination to find the positive hero, the heroic personality, an optimistic approach to all people with the belief that every worker contains within himself a seed of creativity, nobility and grandeur... The conception of socialist humanism, on which socialist realism is based, leads to the second determinig feature of our artistic method. The ability to view life in revolutionary development and to perceive this development forms in the artist of socialist realism a special approach to the dramatic and tragic moments in the lives of individual people and societies. This approach sees them as a moment in movement, and not as a state with no beginning and no end. The dramatic and the tragic are surmounted by the heroic." The Digest's title: "Shamota expounds principles of socialist realism."

A1360. Shamota, Mykola. "Urgent questions of literary criticism" / M. Shamota. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.3 (March 1974): 12- 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (8 February 1974): 2-3].

Shamota speaks of the "weakening of class principlemindedness" in criticism where such notions take root as "ideas of classical humanism" exemplified by the image of Don Quixote and such poets as V. Symonenko are presented as models for literary youth. Shamota also attacks the translators led by Kochur and Lukash for bringing "out of 'deep freeze'" obsolete words (such as chasopys, zaliublenyi, vidsotok, nabutky etc.) "to oust the living language, especially where it showed a natural and regular affinity with the Russian language, from our literature." The Digest's title: "Shamota scores Kochur and Lukash for promoting 'a dead language'."

A1361. Shankovsky, Igor. "The diary named 'Marges of Thoughts'." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.2 (Summer 1975): 74-96.

About Vasyl' Symonenko's diary with extensive translated quotations from it. Symonenko diary covering the time period from 18 September 1962 to 20 September 1963, in Shankovsky's view "Serves as the only key to complex cases of the semantic signification on separate words and phrases in his poetry and prose." The poem "Roses in mourning", excerpts from a poem "A monologue before the icons (If you, the saints, were not rachitis ridden)" (16 lines, pp.78-79) are quoted in full in Shankovsky's translation together with a long quote from the diary explaining the meaning of the poems.

Shankovsky also provides a full translation of Symonenko's article "Dekoratsii i zhyvi dereva" (Decorations and the living trees) (pp.86-89) published originally in Literaturna Ukraina (20 August 1963). Symonenko's article deals with the need of "stern and merciless criticism, that would develop our brains, not our selfesteem" and claims that a truly talented poet cannot "keep on repeating long known notions", but "must be an innovator and a searcher, an explorer of the spiritual deposits". To prove his points Symonenko uses as illustration a poem by M. Ryl's'kyi "Sung [sic] away, this scythe of mine" (16 lines in Shankovsky's translation on pp.87-88). I. Shankovsky also provides two versions of Symonenko's poems Zemne tiazhinnia and Ridna zemle, as published in the journal Ukraina (no.19, 19 August 1963, p.10) and as published later in a posthumous book of poems Zemne tiazhinnia (Kyiv: Molod', 1964) - which show some omissions and changes in the first version. The article includes the following poems of Symonenko in Shankowsky's translations: The Earth's gravity (Oh, my hollow world, millioneyful) (13 lines, pp.89-90); 2d version: *** (What a world - a fairytale embroidery) (17 lines, p.90); *** (Oh, my native land! My brain does lighten) (12 lines, p.90); 2d version: *** (Native land of mine! My brain does lighten) (12 lines (pp.90-91); *** (The sun fell to the dusk of an evening) (28 lines, p.92); The loneliness (Often I am lonely, like the Crusoe) (12 lines, p.95). All of these poems are commented on in the diary. For identifications of individual poems see Index.

A1362. Shankovsky, Igor. "He had no time to waste"/ Igor Shankowsky. ABN Correspondence. 17.6 (November-December 1966): 16-21.

Vasyl' Symonenko is characterized in this article as "a sound, sane and traditional poet, without any trace of abstract pettifoggery of 'art for art's sake'"... "With anger and contempt directed towards the 'executioners with bloody swords'", says Shankovsky, "Symonenko demonstrates his art of deductive psychology with strength that will prevail long after his premature death." The wide-spread popularity of Symonenko's poetry, according to Shankovsky, was due to its "psychological and deductive qualities" and to Symonenko's "devout national sense of belonging."

Quoted in the article are some poems of Symonenko or fragments of poems in English or German translation. The English translations are: The obelisks of granite. like medusas [26 lines, p.17, tr. Nestor D. Procyk]. Carry me, my happy feelings, on your speedy wings [10 lines, p.19, tr.I. Shankovsky]. Swindle or lie - result's just the same [5 lines, p.20, tr. I. Shankovsky]. For identifications of individual poems see Index.

A1363. Shankovsky, Igor. "The poetry of courage and anger." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.4 (Winter 1977): 25-38; 25.1 (Spring 1978): 16-35.

An extract from the author's book Symonenko - a Study in Semantics [cf. B083]. The introductory pages of this study present some statistical data about Soviet Ukrainian writers and some general observations about the 'poets of the sixties'. It is against this background that the author presents his study of Vasyl' Symonenko's poetry, acknowledging the difficulties in ascertaining the complete and true versions of the heavily censored poet. Shankovsky divides Symonenko's poetry into three categories: 1/ poetry of anger, 2/ psychological, deductive poetry, and 3/ self-determinating lyrics. Some of the analyzed poems, the author agrees, contain the elements of all three groups.

Shankovsky provides his own translations with - as a footnote on p.22 states - "a rigid attempt to preserve the forms of originals" - for the following poems which are then analyzed in some detail: *** (The granite obelisks, just like medusae (p.22). The thief (Caught was an oldster, he, somehow was nailed flat) (p.24). *** (Lost in contemplation, I'm inspired) (p.26). The gate (Sombre gate, in wild, unknown forstalling) (p.28). To my Kurd brothers (Blood covered mountains crying out by calling) (p.29). *** (By thousands run the roads, a million pathways run in) (p.30). Carry me, my happy feelings, on your speedy wings (p.31). Necrology for a corn-cob which died at the provisionary stock centre (No moaning can be heard. The orchestras are rusting) (p.32).

Says Shankovsky by way of a conclusion: "the possibility of multiple views and interpretations of semantic values in Symonenko's poetry proves the fact that words and phrases there are often charged with additional meaning."

The study includes also Shankovsky's translations of three poems by Lina Kostenko and one by Maksym Ryl's'kyi in the Winter 1977 issue, namely: Kostenko : ...Oh, many souls became in our century (13 lines, p.35). There're all kinds of relay batons (7 lines, p.35). Seedling (A young tree feathered oneself (p.35). Ryl's'kyi: Advice (A clever gardener once said to me) (12 lines, p.36).

For identifications of individual poems see Index.

A1364. Shankovsky, Igor. "Thirteen short stories by V. Symonenko." Ukrainian Review (London). 17.1 (Spring 1970): 33-42.

A review article of Vyno z troiand (Lviv: Kameniar, 1965) which contains 13 short stories of Vasyl' Symonenko. Symonenko's mastery of the miniature short story, says Shankovsky, "is embodied in his rigid condensation". In the author's opinion, "none of his forerunners achieved such economy of words, such condensation of meaning in a few lines." The article has extensive quotations from the short stories in the author's translation, and one of them - "A black horseshoe" [=Chorna pidkova] appears in its entirety on pp.36-37.

A1365. Shankovsky, Igor. "Two fairy-tales for adults." Ukrainian Review (London). 24.2 (Summer 1977): 68-93.

An extract from Shankovsky's book Symonenko - a Study in Semantics [cf. B083]. Literal and allegorical interpretations of two fairy tales by Vasyl' Symonenko: "Tsar Lachrymal and the Titillator" and "Journey to the country Upside-Down" with extensive quotations from the two works. According to Shankovsky, the plots of both fairy-tales involve "two countries with totalitarian systems" and "Both systems are shown to be by Symonenko's narrator as negative..." The narrator sides with "uncle Titillator" in the first fairy-tale and with the "children" in the second, says Shankovsky and all are temporarily jailed, in one case, for neglecting "bad laws", and in the other for "non-conformism". In both fairy-tales the regime is represented by the "Tsar". In Shankovsky's view, Symonenko "ridiculed and condemned the totalitarian system as such."

The quoted excerpts from the two long poems in rhymed but unattributed (apparently, the author's own) translations are as follows:

From "Tsar Lachrymal and the Titillator" ("Tsar Plaksii ta Loskoton"):

Tsar's family (Where the valleys meet the mountains) [22 lines, pp.70-71]. Lachrymal gave orders madly [19 lines, pp.71-72]. Uncle Titillator (Well, in this amazing tsardom) [36 lines, pp.72-73]. Arrest of the Titillator (Lachrymal got mad and fierce) [50 lines, pp.74-75]. Wedding in the palace (They threw Titillator, alas) [32 lines, pp.76-77]. Release of Titillator (While the wedding went on hooting) [16 lines, pp.77-78]. The wedding continues (In the palace - all are jumping) [40 lines, pp.78-79]. If you wish to find this land [10 lines, p.80].

From "Journey to the country Upside Down" ("Podorozh u krainu Navpaky"): Now, all four together, started [22 lines, pp.81-82]. Well, for kids, this magic land [35 lines, pp.82-83]. By a millhouse, on their part [36 lines, pp.84-85]. In the dungeon, where sound dies [18 lines, pp.85-86]. And the soldiers in blue slacks [38 lines, pp.86-87]. Flowers call the kids to play [43 lines, pp.88-89]. Well, the children, the poor children [26 lines, p.90]. And the travellers holler: "No [5 lines, p.91].

The article includes also a translation of Borys Oliinyk's poem "Not for children (It's better to die while standing up) [22 lines, pp.92-93] and Shevchenko's fragments from the poem "Kavkaz": Not just a few trained people fell [10 lines, p.74] and So they had you taken, my only friend, Jacob [11 lines, p.76].

For identifications see Index.

A1366. Shankovsky, Igor. "Vasyl Symonenko and his background." / Igor Peter Shankovsky. Ukrainian Review (London). 14.1 (Spring 1967): 20-38; 14.2 (Summer 1967): 33-43; 14.4 (Winter 1967): 44-55. Biblio.

A master of Arts thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Alberta. In his attempt to place the poet Vasyl' Symonenko (1935-1963) within the context of modern Soviet Ukrainian literature, the author devotes considerable attention to the poet's background and environment. There is a detailed critical discussion of the bibliographic dictionary of Ukrainian writers and its many omissions (Ukrains'ki pys'mennyky: bio- bibliohrafichnyi slovnyk. Kyiv: 1960-1965. 5v.) and statistical tables are provided for such data as social origin, party affiliation, education, nationality, territorial origin, war losses and political persecution of Soviet Ukrainian writers.

The main focus of the thesis is on Vasyl' Symonenko's diary which covers the period from 18 September 1962 through 20 September 1963. Extensive quotations from the diary are given in translation and with Shankovsky's commentary. "The Diary", says Shankovsky, "determined Symonenko's place within the framework of Soviet Ukrainian literature. It is not on the side of 'socialist realism'. Knowing the most intimate thoughts of the poet is already a stepping-stone towards better understanding of his works." It is only in the final concluding part of the thesis that Symonenko is discussed as "a poet and spokesman". Symonenko, says Shankovsky, "revealed the reality that surrounded him with anger and dismay." "Any serious investigation and/or analysis" of Symonenko's poetry is difficult, says the author, because of Soviet censorship and the lack of a complete collection of Symonenko's poetry. A number of poems are given in literal English translations by Volodymyr Bohdaniuk in the final segment (Winter 1967 issue), namely "Granite obelisks, like medusae" (26 lines, pp.45-46); "Where are they - the fat and the gray" (9 lines, p.47); "I look into your eyes (32 lines, pp.47-48); "With wild and unknown utterings" (16 lines, p.49); "O Kurd, save your munitions" (12 lines, p.50); "There are thousands of roads, a million narrow paths" (20 lines, pp.50-51). A three page bibliography is appended. For identification of the translated poems see Index.

A1367. Shatulsky, Myron. "Ivan Kotlyarevsky, 1769-1969. The 200th anniversary of the birth of the founder of modern Ukrainian literature will be widely celebrated this month in Ukraine and in many countries of the world where Ukrainian cultural communities flourish. Ivan Kotlyarevsky was born on September 9, 1769." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.516 (10) (September 1969): 43-46. illus.

Shatulsky characterizes Kotliarevs'kyi as one who was able "to reflect and project the historic changes taking place during his life"; he provides a sketch of the writer's biography, writes about Kotliarevs'kyi's adaptation of Virgil's epic poem "The Aeneid", of his involvement with the theater and of his writing of what has become "the most popular and best known dramatic work of the new Ukrainian literature" - "Natalka Poltavka". Kotliarevs'kyi's "Aeneida", says Shatulsky, unlike previous adaptations of Italian (Lalli), French (Scarron, in text: Scarone), German (Blumaer) and Russian (Osipov) writers, was quite different: "instead of Virgil's commemoration of Rome's glory he brought forth the Ukrainian Cossacks, underlining their heroism, and portrayed the life of the different stratas in Ukrainian society of that period." "In the creation of his scenes and characters the poet brings to the fore important social questions of his day and resolves them from the viewpoint of a humanist and a democrat," says Shatulsky. Four excerpts from the poem "Aeneida" in Mary Skrypnyk's translation with illustrations by A. Bazilevich are added, namely: "Aeneas was a lively lad" (4 lines); "Old Neptune laughed and winked an eye" (4 lines), "Thus glorious Cossack regiments" (6 lines), "Aeneas wasn't one to tarry" (5 lines). There is a full page b/w portrait of Kotliarevs'kyi on p.[42]. A chronology of Kotliarevs'kyi's life and work appears on p. [47].

A1368. Shcherbak, Iurii. "Red leaves of Budapest." / Yuriy Shcherbak. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 13.1 (January 1969): 14-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (26 November 1968): 4].

Shcherbak muses about his visit to Budapest, his meetings with Hungarian book publishers, translators and artists. Says Shcherbak: "This small, proud nation has managed to stand among the most culturally advanced nations of the world, surmounting all language barriers." He comments about the "lovely, tastefully published books" of Europa Publishers, about Sara Karig, editor of an anthology of Ukrainian short stories - in Shcherbak's view, perhaps "the most representative" of all such anthologies published outside of Ukraine, of the planned anthology of Ukrainian poetry, of his meetings with translators from Ukrainian and specialists in Ukrainian literature Eva Grigashi, Dyerd Rado, Anna Bojtar, Endre Bojtar. The Digest's title: "A novelist's impression of Hungary."

A1369. Shcherbyts'kyi, Volodymyr. "7th Congress of Ukraine's Writers. We must carry high the banner of party-mindedness and peoplemindedness in Soviet literature. Speech by member of the CC CPSU Politburo, First Secretary of the CC CP Ukraine, Comrade V.V. Shcherbyts'kyy." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.6 (June 1976): 13-15. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (16 April 1976): 1-2].

Says Shcherbyts'kyi: "... every writer must understand that detente does not lead to compromises in the sphere of ideology. The struggle of ideas does not cease, it even grows more intense and assumes more complex forms." "... Our party and people have always resolutely rebuffed and will rebuff every act of ideological subversion, every attempt to blunt our ideological weapons or to stain our banner..." The Digest's title: "Shcherbyts'kyy addresses Ukraine's writers."

A1370. Shcherbyts'kyi, Volodymyr. "To a poet of genius, to an ardent fighter; unveiling of the Lesya Ukrainka monument in Kiev. Speech by Comrade V.V. Shcherbyts'kyy." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.10 (October 1973): 9-10. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (7 September 1973): 1-3].

Lesia Ukrainka is characterized as "...loyal daughter of the working people and active participant in the all-Russian liberation movement." The Digest's title: Shcherbyts'kyy unveils Lesua Ukrainka monument in Kiev".

A1371. Shein, Louis J. "Ivan Franko's religious Weltanschauung." Ukrainian Quarterly. 35.4 (Winter 1979) 381-389.

"It is the thesis of this paper," says Shein, "that Franko's religious or more correctly, spiritual Weltanschauung was deeply rooted in the Bible, which was for him a perennial source of moral and spiritual inspiration." In the author's view, "Those who accused Franko of atheism and radical socialism failed to acknowledge that his socialism was rooted in the prophetic ideals of justice, truth, compassion and freedom. His socialism was in fact an ideal for work and not a political Marxist program." The article has brief quotations from Franko's poetry in Percival Cundy's translation.

A1372. Shelest, Petro. "Militant goals of Soviet Ukrainian literature. Speech by Comrade P.Yu. Shelest at the Fifth Congress of the Writers of Ukraine." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.1 (January 1967): 1-3. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (17 November 1966): 2].

In his speech to the congress of writers, Shelest, after reminding his audience of the need to follow the teachings of Marxism-Leninism, of the "irreconcileable ideological struggle between the opposing forces of socialism and capitalism" and of the attempts of the bourgeois ideologists "to drive a wedge between the Communist Party and the ranks of creative intelligentsia", says also the following: "The development of the socialist Ukrainian culture and language in many respects depends on people who have gathered here today; and it depends, in the first place, not on talks about the necessity for such development, but on your creativity. You must treat our beautiful Ukrainian language with great care and respect. It is our treasure, our great heritage, which all of us, but in the first place you, our writers, must preserve and develop. Novels, short stories and poetry of high ideological content written in our beautiful language on a high artistic level - all are indispensable for the further enrichment and development of national culture and language." The Digest's supplied title reads: "Shelest gives blessing to Ukrainian language, tells writers to be wary of 'political errors'."

A1373. "Sheremet, Nikolay Spiridonovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 562.

Mykola Sheremet, born 1906, was a poet (27 lines of bio-bibliographical data).

A1374. Shevchenko, Anatolii. "The author turns to humor. A literary feuilleton." / Anatoliy Shevchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.11 (November 1968): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (4 October 1968): 3].

Oleh Kylymnyk, the author of the book Kriz' roky, which deals with the development of contemporary Ukrainian literature, is ridiculed for having his analyses of individual writers "all cast in the same mould". The Digest supplied title reads: "Standardized literary criticism ridiculed".

A1375. Shevchenko, Anatolii. "Who are you, comrade critic?" / Anatoliy Shevchenko. Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 12.12 (December 1968): 22-23. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 October 1968): 2].

Shevchenko takes issue with Novychenko's interpretation and negative appraisal of Pavlychko's poem "Molytva". [cf. A1050]. Shevchenko claims that the word critic has lost its old meaning and that "Graphomania is as dangerous to criticism as it is to creative literature..." He calls for greater emphasis "in the struggle against graphomania", because, in his view, "the graphomaniac is not just an innocent lamb who writes bad verse, poor novels or feeble reviews; he is a social menace. Graphomaniacs have always served the most backward social circles; they have always defended obsolete views and ideas. Adaptability is their life credo", says Shevchenko. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Young author charges most critics with graphomania." See also A492.

A1376. Shevchenko, Larysa. "What does a reader look for?" Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 18.1 (January 1974): 21-22. [Full text. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (13 November 1973): 2].

A survey of readers and the sales personnel of the bookstore "Poeziia" in Kyiv. The survey testifies to a considerable demand for poetry which the bookstore finds impossible to fill. The Digest's title: "Poetry collections scarce in the book market".

A1377. Shevchenko, Taras. "My destiny: an autobiographical essay." Forum. 1.2 (Spring 1967): 4-8. illus.

Shevchenko's autobiography written a year before his death is translated from the original Russian from the book Taras Shevchenko: dokumenty i materialy, 1814-1963. Ed. by S.D. Pilkevich. (Kyiv, 1963). The autobiography was originally sent by Shevchenko to the Russian journal Narodnoe chteniye and was published there in 1860. This English version is printed with comments by the editor of Forum, and has some passages added from a different translation (based on a manuscript of John Weir). Shevchenko relates the main events of his life, but it is noteworthy and pointed out by the editor, that there is no mention in Shevchenko's text as printed in Narodnoe chteniye, of the ten years in Shevchenko's life (1847-1857) spent in punitive exile in Asia. The illustrations include two portraits of Shevchenko and a Shevchenko drawing of his parental house.

A1378. Shevchenko, Teren'. "Only those with wings should fly." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 20.9 (September 1976): 19-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (6 August 1976): 2].

A reader's response to Emil Yanvaryov's polemic article "Your field of battle" (Literaturna Ukraina, 25 June 1976). It is necessary, says Shevchenko, "to cultivate gifted young people who are attracted to literature", but "grayness should not be posed along with high professionalism". The Digest's title: "Hack work must not be allowed to appear", writes Literaturna Ukraina reader."

A1379. "Shevchenko and his heroes on stage and screen." Ukrainian Canadian. 22.511 (5) (March 1969): 28-29.

A collage of b/w photos from films and stage productions about Taras Shevchenko, or based on the works of Shevchenko. With brief captions.

A1380. "Shevchenko as a boy on film." Ukrainian Canadian. 25.556 (49) (March 1973): 34. illus.

Four photographs with brief captions from two films about Shevchenko made in 1926: "Little Taras" and "Taras Shevchenko".

A1381. "Shevchenko monument in Paris." Ukrainian Canadian. 31.614 (108) (September 1978): 21.

A news item reprinted from News from Ukraine about the unveiling on 24 May 1978 of a monument to Taras Shevchenko on Saint Germain Boulevard in Paris. The bronze bust of the poet by the sculptor Mykhailo Lysenko was the gift of Ukrainian Society for Friendship and Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries.

A1382. "Shevchenko Prize winners." Forum. 9 (Summer 1969): 29.

A listing of the 1969 recipients of the Shevchenko Prize in the Ukrainian SSR. Shevchenko Prize in Literature was awarded in 1969 to Andrii Holovko.

A1383. "Shevchenko the artist." Ukraine. 1(13) (1973): [12-15], illus., port., part. col.

The unsigned article claims that "Shevchenko's artistic legacy had a great influence on the subsequent development of realistic art, and has not lost its significance to this day." Illustrated with six Shevchenko paintings (two of which are full page and in color), and including Shevchenko's self-portait of 1860 and the portrait of Ira Aldridge.

A1384. "Shevchenko's 'Nazar Stodolya'." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.518 (12) (November 1969): 41. illus.

An unsigned article about Shevchenko's 1843 play "Nazar Stodolia" to accompany an English translation of an excerpt published in the same issue. [cf. T356]. "Nazar Stodolia" is characterized here as "the only complete dramatic work to come down to us from Shevchenko's heritage"- three other plays are mentioned: "The Bride (Nevesta)", "Danylo Reva" and "Nikita Haidai", none of which have survived, except for some fragments. The following is a comment on "Nazar Stodolia": "Shevchenko realistically shows the social enmities that existed between the wealthy Cossack officers, as represented by Khoma Kichatiy and the mass of impoverished cossackdom (Nazar and Hnat). There is social conflict in the love story - the wealthy Kichatiy tries to separate his daughter Halya from the poor cavalry officer Nazar and marry her to a wealthy colonel. With black and white illustrations from the film "Nazar Stodolia".

A1385. Shevchuk, Valerii. "Problem of the short story." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 11.10 (October 1967): 15-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (1 September 1967): 3].

The Digest's supplied title reads: "Writer speaks out on the state of short story; calls for new editions of 'forgotten' authors." Shevchuk decries the absence in Ukrainian of anthologies and collections of the short story that would include "the finest examples of the genre and re-create given epochs or schools of the short story". He criticizes the four-volume general anthology edited by M. Shumylo and M. Syrotiuk [Syrotyuk] (1960) for having been compiled "according to some strange principles" which "led to the inclusion of superficial works which fail to delve into complex, especially psychological questions"... were "written in a style of ethnographic realism" and "lack topicality and sagacity". In publishing collected works of one writer, as was the case with H. Khotkevych, says Shevchuk, "a series of brilliant short stories were excluded... in favor of less meritorius prose". According to Shevchuk, we must "concentrate more on republishing our short story legacy. We must consider selection more carefully and be more exacting in our evaluation of ideological and artistic qualities of a given work." Shevchuk mentions also the need to study professional studies of the genre such as Mike Iohansen's book Iak buduiet'sia opovidannia (1928) and to republish short stories by such authors as Levko Skrypnyk, Modest Levyts'kyi, Dmytro Tas, Halyna Zhurba.

A1386. "Shiyan, Anatoliy Ivanovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 566.

Thirty-one lines of bio-bibliographical data about Anatolii Shyian, a writer and playwright born 1906.

A1387. Shklovsky, Victor. "Alexander Dovzhenko." Soviet Film. 7 (122) (July 1967): 8. illus.

"Alexander Dovzhenko not only made a place for himself in world cinema, he created an absolutely new place in the whole of world cinematography...", says Shklovsky. "This Ukrainian artist revealed to the world a new quality of discovering the most unusual phenomena. His works are both pictures and songs. A song is always an appraisal of life, the voice of its author is always present in a song. In this sense even an epic song is lyricaL. In it we not only see the world, we see how a man looks at this world."

A1388. "Shkurupiy, Geo (Yuriy) Danilovich." Who Was Who in the USSR. (1972). 509.

Bio-bibliographical data (12 lines) about the poet Geo Shkurupii (b. 20 April 1903, d. 25 November 1937).

A1389. Shlapak, Dmytro. "On the 70th anniversary of the birth of Yaroslav Halan. His deeds live on." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 16.9 (September 1972): 14. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina (25 July 1972): 2].

About Iaroslav Halan, author of what is characterized as "pamphlets and feuilletons directed against the Ukrainian bourgeois nationalists and the Anglo-American imperialists..." The Digest's title: "Halan anniversary widely celebrated".

A1390. Shlapak, Dmytro. "Young literature and modern times." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.2 (February 1966): 18-20. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Molod' Ukrainy (29 December 1965): 3-4].

Shlapak takes issue with an article by Ivan Boichak "Children under 16 are not permitted to read poetry" published in the magazine Ranok [cf. ULE: Articles in Journals and Collections, 1840-1965, A54] which was a positive critical assessment of Ivan Drach's poetry. Shlapak criticizes Boichak for his alleged failure "to notice the all-'round favorable effect of the life-giving Soviet reality upon the creative growth of young writers" and for attempting "to place at opposite ends the young literature and the older generations of writers of Soviet Ukraine..." The Digest's supplied title: "Drach dispute continues: his defender is assailed".

A1391. "Short biographies of the people mentioned" . ABN Correspondence. 26.6 (November-December 1975): 34-35.

Brief bio-bibliographical data about Ukrainian dissidents in the USSR, among them writers Stus, Chornovil, Senyk, Stasiv-Kalynets', Osadchyi.

A1392. Shtohryn, Dmytro M. "Problems in the history of Ukrainian literary bibliography." Minutes of the Seminar in Ukrainian Studies held at Harvard University during the academic year 1978-1979. 9 (1978-1979): 67-68.

A summary of a paper presented on 22 March 1979 and of the discussion that followed. The speaker gave a critical review of the five-volume literary bibliography Ukrains'ki pys'mennyky: bio-bibliohrafichnyi slovnyk [Kyiv, Derzhavne vyd-vo khudozhnioi literatury, 1960-1965].

A1393. Shtohryn, Dmytro M. "Ukrainian literature in the United States: trends, influences, achievements." Ethnic Literatures Since 1776: the Many Voices of America: Proceedings. Ed. by Wolodymyr T. Zyla and Wendell A. Aycock. Comparative Literature Symposium, Texas Tech University. 9.2 (1978): 569-590. port.

Ukrainian literature in the United States, says Shtohryn, began to develop in the 1890's, but organized literary life did not start until after World War II. Shtohryn provides a socio-historical background of Ukrainian immigrants in the United States and surveys four generations of Ukrainian writers, from such pioneer-authors as Hryhorii Hrushka and Sava Chernets'kyi whose work was more significant for social than for literary reasons; to post-World War I poets Oleksandr Hranovs'kyi (Alexander Granovsky) and Stepan Musiichuk; to the recent wave of Ukrainian immigrants after World War II which brought with it a large number of authors with their literary reputations already established in Europe; and finally to the American-educated group of younger writers, the so called New York Group of Poets. Shtohryn surveys Ukrainian literary societies and periodical publications in the United States and lists a number of poets, short story writers, novelists, playwrights and critics. The article includes, by way of illustration, some excerpts from poetry in translation, i.e. Begin, brothers, to act / Hryhorii Hrushka [8 lines, tr. D.M. Shtohryn, p.574] O free us, merciful God / Sava Chernets'kyi [15 lines, tr. M.I. Mandryka, p.575]. I have been often asked - how can I love ? / Oleksandr Hranovs'kyi [24 lines, pp.577-578, tr. by author?]. Look at the stone. It holds its peace / Ievhen Malaniuk [14 lines, p.582, tr.C.H. Andrusyshen & W. Kirkconnell]; The grated, stained-glass window, guard-house style / Bohdan Kravtsiv [14 lines, p.582, tr. C.H. Andrusyshen & W. Kirkconnell]. For identyfikations of individual poems see Index.

A1394. Shulman, Morton. "How to help Valentyn Moroz?" ABN Correspondence. 26.1 (January-February 1975): 25-26.

An article reprinted from Toronto Sun of 15 November 1974. The author proposes that Canada should exert pressure on the Soviet government to "allow impartial medical personnel to examine Moroz" by closing grain sales to the USSR. See Index for related articles about the case of Valentyn Moroz.

A1395. Shum, Ariadna. "Lesya Ukrainka - a bard of struggle and contrasts." Ukrainian Review (London). 22.2 (Summer 1975): 71-73.

Speaking of the dramatic works of Lesia Ukrainka, the author says: "...only directors who can understand the strength of contrasts, the conflict of ideas, the dynamism of her works, the special symbolic meaning that have their roots in psychology and philosophy, will be able to do her justice and convey the true meaning of her words." Lesia Ukrainka's importance in Ukrainian literature, according to Shum, "lies not only in her poetic abilities, but also in the ideological content of her works. She stressed the importance of sacrifice for an idea, she called for a struggle against unjust rulers, she called for action; she strongly believed in the ultimate victory of light over darkness and in the importance of active optimism." The poem "Why do I not possess the fiery word" appears on pp.72-73 in an unattributed translation.

A1396. "Shumuk, Danylo Lavrentiyovych". Ukrainian Political Prisoners in the Soviet Union. (1979): 96-97. port.

A page and a quarter of data about dissident activities and prison experiences of Danylo Shumuk, author of memoirs, born 1914.

A1397. Shumylo, Mykyta. "A source of cultural enrichment." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 10.4 (April 1966): 21.23. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Literaturna Ukraina. (22 February 1966): 1-2].

Shumylo, chairman of the Fine Translations Committee, delivered the opening address at a conference of translators held on the 18th and 19th of February 1966. He discussed the achievements of Borys Ten (who translated Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles), Mykola Lukash (who translated Goethe's "Faust" and Boccaccio's "Decameron"), Vasyl Mysyk (the translator of Omar Khayyam) Mykola Bazhan (who translated Shota Rustaveli), as well as the translators of the three-volume Ukrainian edition of Shakespeare. The title supplied by the Digest reads: "Translators assess achievements, needs."

A1398. Shvatchenko. O.A. "Mogila, Petr Simeonovich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 16 (1977): 415. Biblio.

Petro Mohyla (1596-1647) is characterized as a "Political, church and cultural figure of the Ukraine, metropolitan of Kiev and Galicia..." He was also the author of sermons and hagiographic works. (21 lines).

A1399. Shynkaruk, V. "Anger, passion and love. On the anniversary of the birth of H.S.Skovoroda." Digest of the Soviet Ukrainian Press. 17.1 (January 1973): 16-17. [Excerpts. Ukrainian original in Radians'ka Ukraina (1 December 1972): 6].

The legacy of Skovoroda, says Shynkaruk, "was and remains an object of sharp ideological contest..." Ukrainian bourgeois-nationalists "repeat over and over again the arguments that Skovoroda was an 'exclusively' Ukrainian phenomenon, a manifestation of the mystical 'Ukrainian spirit'; they ignore the class and social content of his teachings, his call to brotherhood of the working people of all nations, his close ties with progressive Russian culture." The Digest's title: "Bourgeois-nationalists accused of ignoring class and social content of Skovoroda's philosophy".

A1400. Siehs, Karl. "The Fifth Writers' Congress in Kyïv." / K. Siehs. Ukrainian Review (London). 14.1 (Spring 1967): 50-57.

The writers' congress took place on 16-19 November 1966 with 780 members participating. The congress was characterized, according to Siehs, by an "amazing and far-reaching openness of the discussion", the centrality of the nationality problem as a topic, the involvement, for the first time, of the "writers of the 60's", open criticism of shortcomings and abuses, calls for the publication of hitherto prohibited or unpublished writers, etc.

A1401. Siehs, Karl. "A great European mind: Ivan Yakovych Franko (Born 15(27) August 1856 at Nahuyevychi. Died 28 May 1916 at Lviv). On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his death. Ukrainian Review (London). 13.3 (Autumn 1966): 3-15.

Franko's literary and scholarly work is placed against a detailed biographical background and presented in a chronological manner. The author stresses Franko's "extraordinary versatility" and "indefatigable industry", the influence of Mykhailo Drahomanov [Drahomaniv in text], Franko's activity in politics which led to his three imprisonments, his scholarly attainments and disappointments, the controversies with the Poles over his article on Mickiewicz and with his own countrymen over his introduction to a Polish translation of his Galician sketches and, finally, the public celebration on 30 September 1898 of the 25th jubilee of the poet's literary and public activity which, says Siehs, "turned out to be one of the highlights in Franko's life". Three of Franko's poetic works are singled out for special attention. "Moses", says Siehs, ..." is almost an autobiography of Franko. Together with "Cain" and "Ivan Vyshensky", its closely related forerunners, it may confidently be placed alongside the greatest achievements in world literature. It shows the working of the mind of the spiritual leader in the difficult task of communicating his ideas to the people around him and his equally compelling desire to follow the chosen path to the very end. Cain, Vyshensky and Moses - each of them depends on human society for his mission. Sooner or later each of them comes to realise that he cannot find the peace he sought either in solitude or among the inert, unthinking crowd - and herein lies the tragedy with which their inner lives are confronted."

The article contains the following Franko poems or fragments of poems in Vera Rich's translations: There are two roads (There are two roads to virtue the years offer)(14 lines, p.15). And, brother, you love Rus' (16 lines, p.13). And what great hardship came to wrong you? (6 lines, p.13). Because my song has pain and sorrow in it (4 lines, p.12). Son of a nation (4 lines, p.3). Labour and song are mighty twin forces (4 lines, p.3). If you hear in the night at your window there seems (8 lines, p.7). For identifications of individual poems see Index.

A1402. "A silence more deafening than thunder." / LDB d- L. ABN Correspondence. 25.5 (September-October 1974): 33-40.

A survey of the various actions and news reports in Canada on behalf of Valentyn Moroz, currently a prisoner in the USSR.

A1403. "Sizonenko, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich." Prominent Personalities in the USSR. (1968). 580.

Bio-bibliographical data about the writer Oleksandr Syzonenko, born 1923. (18 lines).

A1404. Sjöberg, Anders. "Two unknown translations of Meletij Smotrickij's Slavonic Grammar." Scando-Slavica. 12 (1966): 123-131.

Smotryts'kyi's Slavonic grammar, according to the author, "was known and used not only in Russia but also in Western Europe." A considerable number of copies are still preserved in European libraries and "several of the existing copies have been supplied with more or less complete translations to Latin in their wide margins," says Sjöberg. He provides a detailed description of two hitherto unknown and unpublished Latin translations of Smotryts'kyi's grammar: one, which he identifies as number 139 of "Russian Acts XIX in fascicles", preserved in the State Archives of Stockholm ("the Stockholm manuscript") and "the Prague manuscript", designated as IX E 40, preserved in the National Museum in Prague.

A1405. Skliar, F.F. "Golovanivskii, Savva Evseevich". Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 7 (1975): 256. Biblio.

About Sava Holovanivs'kyi (born 1910), poet, novelist, playwright. (19 lines). According to Skliar, Holovanivs'kyi's works "deal mainly with the life and labor of the Soviet people and the exploits of Soviet soldiers in the Great Patriotic War (1941-45)".

A1406. Skochok, V. "Letter of three Ukrainian intellectuals to the Kiev satirical journal Perets." / V. Skochok, V. Chornovil, L. Sheremetyeva. Ukrainian Review (London). 15.3 (Autumn 1968): 32-39.

The letter dated 27 September 1966 protests the publication in Perets' of an article attacking the literary critic Ivan Dziuba. The article in Perets' appeared in its no.17, September 1966 issue under the title "On Mr. Stetsko and the little martyred frog" and was signed "Vasyl Osadchyi".

A1407. Skripnik, I.P. "Kropivnitskii, Mark Lukich." Great Soviet Encyclopedia. 13 (1976): 518. Biblio.

"A democrat and humanist, the writer had a profound knowledge of the life and mores of the different strata of contemporary society. As a playwright he possessed a rich and stylistically varied vocabulary from everyday speech", says Skripnik about Marko Kropyvnyts'kyi (1840- 1910). (23 lines).

A1408. Skrypnyk, Mary. "Folklore: a people's treasure". Ukrainian Canadian. 23.524 (18) (May 1970): 83-84, 87, 89-91. illus.

About songs and stories created by folk artists of Ukraine and passed orally from one generation to another. The article discusses incantations, riddles, proverbs, folk songs, dumas, folk tales and fables.

A1409. Skrypnyk, Mary. "French honour Shevchenko". Ukrainian Canadian. 27.575 (68) (December 1974): 8-11, 13. illus.

A monument to Taras Shevchenko was unveiled in Challette-Sur-Loing, a community of 15,000 some 100 km south of Paris. The author attended the ceremonies which took place on 12-13 October 1974 and reports about the concert attended by some 1500 people and the banquet reception for 300. Among those in attendance: the Soviet ambassador to France Stepan Chervonenko, the mayor of Chalette Max Nublat, eleven delegates from UkrSSR including the writer Pavlo Zahrebel'nyi. The program of the concert included the local Zaporozhtsi Dance Ensemble and soloists from Kyiv. The bronze bust of Shevchenko is by the sculptor O. Skoblikov.

A1410. Skrypnyk, Mary. "The Kobzar in English". Ukrainian Canadian. 22.511 (5) (March 1969): 45-46.

A bibliographic survey of English translations and studies of Shevchenko's works from 1877 through 1964.

A1411. Skrypnyk, Mary. "Lesya Ukrainka: a heritage for today and tomorrow." Ukrainian Canadian. 23.531 (25) (January 1971): 29-38, 40-43. illus., ports.

An extended illustrated article about the life and work of Lesia Ukrainka written on the occasion of her 100th birth anniversary. This essay, supplemented with other materials, was issued also as a separate offprint [cf. B089]. Illustrations include portraits of Lesia Ukrainka and of her parents Olena Pchilka and Petro Kosach; p.43 has a full page photo of Lesia Ukrainka's graveyard monument in Kyiv. The article discusses also the English translations of Lesia Ukrainka's works and is interspersed with poetry fragments, apparently in the author's own translations. Among the longer fragments: Time and again Ukraine has seen (8 lines, p.32); Whenever my eyes I raise up to the heavens (6 lines, p.33); I long to go out into an open meadow (4 lines, p.33); Oh my p